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tank

North Florida Cold Hardy Palms

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tank

Its been awhile since I've posted a topic but here are some palm pics from my yard in Gainesville:

Parajubaea cocoides x butia

61100040642--6781CA81-DBD2-42D1-BC9B-ECF1E73EBF73.thumb.JPG.e591cf06afe315eb878e617fd676b5f3.JPG

 

Trithrinax brasiliensis

 

61100047832--D8E09227-B744-4EF8-9011-25A56C658258.thumb.JPG.fa097dd9bdea482328abe1e383992c93.JPG

 

Trachycarpus principes

 

61100057632--D83890B8-4089-4EFD-97F4-D63ADCA99852.thumb.JPG.51cbb764b51fd081a69115543874aec6.JPG

 

Jubaea x Butia

 

61100063835--FD559B2D-3E23-4DBE-A39D-E32BA11FFF63.thumb.JPG.1c3ae778270906b2187b5e74bb4ed01c.JPG

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tank

Copernicia alba

 

61100054852--23F2168C-325D-4CA4-8DD9-E70227C2BFBD.thumb.JPG.a7b38702ff5bb84879997f921bbbe72f.JPG

 

Jubaea x Butia x Syagrus (Tim Hopper hybrid)

 

61100068301--1BB9AA16-FCDD-47F5-80A7-F4CC1FEE7F2D.thumb.JPG.cd245d1aa2dd5c1d43cfe594cb98ab64.JPG

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8B palms

awesome palms, has the braziliensis ever had any freeze damage.  I have one planted but it has been engulfed in grape vines and smilax, I need to see if its still alive, it doesn't take long for the wilds to recapture a yard.  Have you tried W filifera? here in town, I would like to find a reliable source of the filibusta to gain some humidity along with cold tolerance.

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tank

Cycas deboaensis next to a Raphis humulis (not a good pic!)

 

 

61100078477--4ED1339B-753D-4DB5-BA17-0E63684BC844.thumb.JPG.9926cbdc12c2a7f40712c51a275468b3.JPG

 

Mule, relocated from Tim Hopper's yard about 5 or 6 years ago

 

61100095779--6893C04A-5DCA-4100-8C65-FF3F272DE549.thumb.JPG.cb2b8ac0cb3a8203db6e4abd4448e25c.JPG

 

Brahea armata

 

61100103835--4184CF9F-ABE2-4DE8-82ED-C7F687381F88.thumb.JPG.79694784f2f5405f927e74a938d290c8.JPG

 

Brahea dulcis

 

61100106363--A54375B4-574E-4B86-AD10-6ECA4CBD0103.thumb.JPG.ffe2c6a788ad1f4fa63013f9fbbc7c3d.JPG

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RJ
4 minutes ago, 8B palms said:

awesome palms, has the braziliensis ever had any freeze damage.  I have one planted but it has been engulfed in grape vines and smilax, I need to see if its still alive, it doesn't take long for the wilds to recapture a yard.  Have you tried W filifera? here in town, I would like to find a reliable source of the filibusta to gain some humidity along with cold tolerance.

There is a long term filbusta in Columbia that I would like to get seeds off of. 

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tank

Jubaea x syagrus (had the plant for about 4 years or so but only planted it out last year.... probably would be twice this size if I had planted it when I got it)

 

61100110038--A8D263F8-BF79-4D1D-A1DC-4ACDE1BA0733.thumb.JPG.a9ced4d77188dc5c854072e0a73c20a0.JPG

 

2 small Brahea claras and some succulents

 

61100129432--36871A32-1AFD-4886-ABD9-E5672F280672.thumb.JPG.fdd780461ba54f7b15eef31bddf67ae0.JPG

 

Nannorrhops ritchiana "arabica" (super slow grower)

 

61100134229--8DC8D8FE-2251-47BA-AFF4-FA9D9DEFF323.thumb.JPG.d5f91783ab51dcf501d3ef8d6f502043.JPG

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tank
14 minutes ago, 8B palms said:

awesome palms, has the braziliensis ever had any freeze damage.  I have one planted but it has been engulfed in grape vines and smilax, I need to see if its still alive, it doesn't take long for the wilds to recapture a yard.  Have you tried W filifera? here in town, I would like to find a reliable source of the filibusta to gain some humidity along with cold tolerance.

I have tried W. filifera a couple times but they end up being unhappy and ultimately die.  Probably a mix of nutrient deficiency and humid/rainy weather.  I probably should try again....

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8B palms

I tried good sized pure Jubaea and also B. decumbens, on a raised bed, but no luck.  Your B aramata looks awesome, thats one I should try again.  Where did you get your B Clara from?

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tank

A few Yucca rostratas that are starting to get some size

IMG-6289.thumb.jpg.f12da3f6f76284f45744938b33562495.jpg

 

A Brahea hybrid, probably aculeata and armata (obtained from Merrill Wilcox)

 

61100139951--FF4B19B0-6621-4816-8E8C-E2A39B4D4AD6.thumb.JPG.699b9303557313263cb8395d784fe8a8.JPG

 

Sabal Causiarum (hard to show the scale of this one,  its going to be BIG)

 

IMG-6308.thumb.jpg.aef3dfc2c0dcee10d907abc2807df052.jpg

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tank
6 minutes ago, 8B palms said:

I tried good sized pure Jubaea and also B. decumbens, on a raised bed, but no luck.  Your B aramata looks awesome, thats one I should try again.  Where did you get your B Clara from?

B. armata are tough in Florida.  I ended up getting this one as a 3 gallon plant in a trade with someone out west.  Before that I slowly killed a hundred or so plants grown from seed.  This plant seems to really like the calcium from the oyster and scallop shells.

The claras came from California.  From here:

cycads-n-palms

I have two decumbens.  They struggle.....  but are still alive.

Edited by tank
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tank
7 minutes ago, 8B palms said:

I tried good sized pure Jubaea and also B. decumbens, on a raised bed, but no luck.  Your B aramata looks awesome, thats one I should try again.  Where did you get your B Clara from?

Jubaea will die in Florida.  I'm sure someone will/has posted a success story on this but the amount of effort to get this palm to survive in our climate is not worth the effort.

I, like many others, ignored loads of good advice by experienced growers and tried these in several different conditions/spots in Florida.... all ended up dying.

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tank

Bad picture of a Parajubea sunkah and a Macrozamia moorei

IMG-6310.thumb.jpg.b4bcf368e3ccc48f0443607225b32fb0.jpg

 

Livistona mariea

 

IMG-6311.thumb.jpg.e6f9d8c37301e473d9e5ebff0bab1e46.jpg

 

One of a dozen or so mules in the yard.  9 of which I hybridized myself several years back under the direction of Dr. Wilcox.  Used to be much harder and more expensive to track these down....

 

 

 

IMG-6312.thumb.jpg.c4b0cc74d9f56e8a83e52a7b4c4257aa.jpg

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tank
1 hour ago, 8B palms said:

awesome palms, has the braziliensis ever had any freeze damage.  I have one planted but it has been engulfed in grape vines and smilax, I need to see if its still alive, it doesn't take long for the wilds to recapture a yard.  Have you tried W filifera? here in town, I would like to find a reliable source of the filibusta to gain some humidity along with cold tolerance.

Never experienced freeze damage.  It's been in the ground for about 7 years.

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tank

Sabal domingensis

 

IMG-6293.thumb.jpg.84ea143db61f960a9d3e5c55ea691910.jpg

 

Dioon edule and Ceratozamia hildae

 

IMG-6296.thumb.jpg.89ebe5158014c9dd2fd6b7fa5b32231b.jpg

 

Brahae "super silver" (my last try on this one)

 

IMG-6299.thumb.jpg.bdea5549b886c9c7aca4197ea3dfe664.jpg

 

Sabal "Lisa" (super slow grower for me)

 

IMG-6300.thumb.jpg.ec5884866d4427819f505d362a0995f8.jpg

 

Sabal uresana

 

IMG-6301.thumb.jpg.924a300aa90e93ec6d0e99c81479a346.jpg

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tank

Trachycarpus wagnerianus

 

IMG-6302.thumb.jpg.e0fdfd92857febc7a08f99f0aed675bc.jpg

 

Cycas revoluta x multipinnata (might be multifrondis, I'll have to find the tag)

 

IMG-6303.thumb.jpg.dea5248d2debefdf8cf059e1ef28c59c.jpg

 

Livistona australis

 

IMG-6304.thumb.jpg.69159083a576970e9c075051a8c8cf9e.jpg

 

Arenga micrantha

 

IMG-6305.thumb.jpg.761ef040c887e02308a4ac8a3187a28d.jpg

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tank

Some yard pics (smallish Butia on the right is yatay)

61100099628--166D066E-C9B4-453F-B4CE-66C22405DE06.thumb.JPG.ead9947895349aee7b115b23d43c5aba.JPG

 

Backyard with a small Livistona decora

 

61100073315--FC1212F5-8675-4786-908D-D889353D8E58.thumb.JPG.a6861e789df3ec4965f7b47a08fa889c.JPG

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tank

Livistona nitida  (about 15' overall)

 

IMG-6307.thumb.jpg.9dcb0e6f6fff6859d5c22125559a03bb.jpg

 

Livistona decora (this one is about 20' overall.  Just on the edge of a wetland and the resulting growth has been FAST).

 

IMG-6306.thumb.jpg.d265d9365fda332012625e18ca86645e.jpg

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RJ

Tank, awesome garden and inspirational for all of us! Especially those of us in cooler climates. 

 

So as someone who has both S. causiarum and S. domingensis at younger ages is it easy to tell them apart.  When some of us order up a S. causiarium it often crosses our mind that perhaps we got the less hardy domingensis. 

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bubba

That is an extremely fine palm garden that is extraordinarily well tended! Dr. Merrill Wilcox would be proud to see this work. Still remember your several threads of his highly impressive work. Thank you and great to see you back on the Board!

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8B palms

Thanks for the info (cycads-n-palms) unfortunately they don't list B Clara in stock, I might contact them. Do you know of any local sources of L nitida? Has your flowered and if so set any seed?

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tank
7 minutes ago, RJ said:

Tank, awesome garden and inspirational for all of us! Especially those of us in cooler climates. 

 

So as someone who has both S. causiarum and S. domingensis at younger ages is it easy to tell them apart.  When some of us order up a S. causiarium it often crosses our mind that perhaps we got the less hardy domingensis. 

RJ,

There was a bit of discussion on this a few years back on this board.  Without revisiting the discussion, I will say that these are quite different looking palms.  The S. causiarum looks more like a typical S. palmetto on steroids, with a nice deep green leaf color and not too much of a papery ligule (when compared to the domingensis).  The S. domingensis has larger leaves, a more blue-green hue to the leaves, pronounced ligules.  The leaves on the domingensis are larger and appears to be a larger palm than the S. causiarum.  That said, the aforementioned discussion on these palms had folks wanting to switch the species using my plants as examples.  Hopefully someone will chime in and correct me if I need correcting.

Regardless, these are two distinct sabals and are very different looking plants at this stage.

I have another domingensis planted out at my old house in Gainesville from the same seed batch as the ones at my current house that has about 4 feet of clean trunk.  It is a massive palm.  I'll try and post a pic at some point.

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tank
6 minutes ago, 8B palms said:

Thanks for the info (cycads-n-palms) unfortunately they don't list B Clara in stock, I might contact them. Do you know of any local sources of L nitida? Has your flowered and if so set any seed?

It has not flowered.  I have a few L. nitida in pots.  Let me check to see what I have available.  I'll message you.

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tank
18 minutes ago, bubba said:

That is an extremely fine palm garden that is extraordinarily well tended! Dr. Merrill Wilcox would be proud to see this work. Still remember your several threads of his highly impressive work. Thank you and great to see you back on the Board!

Thanks Bubba!  I hope you're doing well.  I miss your pontificating about our Gators...

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kinzyjr

@tank A lot of nice Brahea in the garden.  Yeah, Nannorrhops grows slow as molasses here, too. 

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Tropicdoc

Your b x pjc made a trunk! Ever thought of cleaning the trunk up smooth? I was thinking of doing that to mine once I got to that point.

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DAVEinMB

@tank awesome collection and gorgeous layout, I'm yelling at my phone right now! 

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Steve in Florida

Do you have some clay in your yard or perhaps some other amendment to help the Brahea armata?  Also, do you have problems with black spotting on it's waxy leaves and if so have you found a preventative?

Edited by Steve in Florida
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Swolte

What a fantastic collection! Looking at some of the vistas, my initial sense was that this should be in the forum above (where I go to get depressed... :p). Yet, I recognized, and own, a fair amount of the 8b palms (where I am)! Awesome that you have the space and perspective to make these palms look their best! I have half an acre 'available' to garden on, which is more than I ever dreamed of, but its crazy how fast that fills up when imagining these things maturing!! :o

How old is this garden? 

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palmsrgreat

Really cool plantings @tank, glad to see you around as I just got back into visiting the site too. I also figured @bubba may enjoy me harassing him about my Tigers dominating season, putting the Gators to shame! :lol:

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tank

Thanks for the nice words on the garden.  It’s about 2 acres on extremely sandy soils.  We’ve owned the house for about 10 years and started planting stuff about 8 years ago.

The property slopes down about 15 feet ending in  a wet area with a wetland located in the adjacent lot.

Here’s some additional plants that might be of interest.
 

Sabal etonia

8843750D-D039-42A3-B325-1F4BEACA0EC4.thumb.jpeg.504cb478b3b450268bd5f5a03e25e129.jpeg
 

Phoenix reclinata x canariensis 

7BFFD5ED-066E-41F8-9CE3-84C27B29F13A.thumb.jpeg.f2c7782731aa3906d95e548107fa467b.jpeg

 

Butia eriospatha

3B8A1C00-3CF4-4E83-B7BF-4418BC801484.thumb.jpeg.8c10a7badcb50099493a26f09b8cd1e7.jpeg

 

One of my sad little Brahea decumbens 

 

91A54C1C-EC6E-4F2F-97E0-1F6057527C15.thumb.jpeg.73ae0ba9ba8da750c3b0e4379be8addd.jpeg

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8B palms

I agree an excellent selection of palms, have you tried A. wrightii, this another one I'd like to find a local source for.

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tank

Cycas taitungensis

 

79C0A759-9479-43CA-82CE-447C1AE47616.thumb.jpeg.50aa3f53792fabcabe4c6b412066f8ca.jpeg

 

Cycad panzinuensis x2

 

EEB06DED-96D3-4612-8E08-BBF38F3F68FD.thumb.jpeg.bba1b663b7a2e384ed0fcdce30316dc1.jpeg

 

Macrozamia mountperriensis

 

A205506C-99C2-47C0-BA5A-7F8F3ACB9ADE.thumb.jpeg.10cdf06969fcce5a5e7f0a17dcec0811.jpeg

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tank

Ceratozamia kuesteriana

 

280352AB-3A23-468F-ADE4-260E82C2A3F1.thumb.jpeg.7c8c9b54f2a310e938a62f44ad249df2.jpeg
 

 

Butia x Jubaea 

 

F1502496-B28F-4745-B33B-2080129DD95E.thumb.jpeg.ca2666eb307ca87f4ac929b3b2d7e6bd.jpeg

 

Chamaedorea microspadix x radicalis

 

DDB86638-BAA1-475D-B310-E06AECC961A1.thumb.jpeg.2fa66924e168053f85ff570d325af5c3.jpeg

 

Sabal guatemalensis (now Mexicana?)

 

8304CE79-B156-4CE5-AA7E-2D93784BF921.thumb.jpeg.8c0d883bba4113c95311b1e7312cc376.jpeg

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tank

Ceratozamia spp

 

ED4A2A9A-22A8-496D-B51D-967412D0E392.thumb.jpeg.f96ad2c678ae3cf1a4fbc7d64c53e8bd.jpeg

 

Macrozamia johnsonii (recovering from some kind of funk)

 

DCA3FFD8-DF58-4EF9-B29C-F6E6EB8B6C93.thumb.jpeg.b4fec20d6819f8f596625bffd3dae542.jpeg
 


Acoelorrhaphe wrightii (in a bit of a construction site)

 

F34AAB15-4BE0-42BC-B354-0004A87CD95A.thumb.jpeg.775fff1a26cd060f167537a028f86f2f.jpeg

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tank
2 hours ago, palmsrgreat said:

Really cool plantings @tank, glad to see you around as I just got back into visiting the site too. I also figured @bubba may enjoy me harassing him about my Tigers dominating season, putting the Gators to shame! :lol:

Good to hear from you.  Not sure what this years football season will look like....

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8B palms

Tank I tried to send you a message but it bounced back saying you can't get messages. I am sure you are busy, but I was wondering if you might have had a chance to check if you might have had an extra L.nitida you night be able to part with, I don't have any palms to trade, I do have a segment of night blooming cactus (Cereus repandus) or seedling Bauhinia forficata, or $.  If you get a chance to check let me know, thanks

I have also heard that the SEC season is cancelled this year

Craig

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TexasColdHardyPalms

I have hundreds of l nitida and b. Clara available if you're live looking to add a few. 

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necturus

A little late, but how long has the Parajubea sunkha been in the ground? How do you water it in the summer time?

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James760

I can't stop looking at your pictures! Wow! What an amazing garden with impressive specimens! If there ever was an award for "Best Cold Hardy Garden"  zone 9a & below you'd surely be in the top :greenthumb:

 

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ruskinPalms

Fantastic garden! Have you tried Dypsis decipiens or Pseudophoenix sargentii? I think both would appreciate the fast draining sandy soil and both are supposed to be fairly cold hardy. I know the Dypsis has been a big fail for most in Florida but it looks like you know what you are doing! :greenthumb:

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      https://www.plantdelights.com/products/sabal-minor-welfare

       
      Sabal minor 'High Springs', FL
      This dwarf Sabal minor comes from the town of High Springs in Alachua County, FL. It is distinctive for being very short, 2' tall, and wide, 4' wide. Leaf pinnae are notably narrow. Flower stalks reach 7' tall.
      See link to PDN catalog below:
      https://www.plantdelights.com/products/sabal-minor-high-springs

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