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Eric Thompson

Washingtonia Robusta germination for nubes like me

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Eric Thompson

Hi folks just put up another video, stop on by if you have a chance. Basic seed germination as well as a look at my largest seed grown washy. 
https://youtu.be/Cc1HQk7RtPw

Edited by Eric Thompson
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