Jump to content
Coasta

Any ideas on where to find a pure washingtonia robusta?

Recommended Posts

Coasta

hello friends! 

 

I am on a mission to find. Pure washingtonia robusta, preferably in arizona :). It seems like all of the ones I look at are Hybrids.   If anyone has an idea, that would be greatly appreciated. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom in Tucson
2 hours ago, Coasta said:

hello friends! 

 

I am on a mission to find. Pure washingtonia robusta, preferably in arizona :). It seems like all of the ones I look at are Hybrids.   If anyone has an idea, that would be greatly appreciated. 

Your best bet would be to drive to southern Sonora and hike up into a region called Nacapule Canyon. You should be able to find some pure stands of Washingtonia robusta there. Or if you are going to Baja California any of the wild stands of palms south of Mulege away from civilization should do. Any time of the year should be okay since the seeds have a long viability, but the seeds usually ripen September to November, and you will find more than you'll ever need.

Good luck in the hunt for purity!

Hi 106˚, Lo 62˚

Edited by Tom in Tucson
  • Like 4
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

While it's true that most of the washingtonia you find for sale will be hybrids to some degree,I can't understand the need for an absolutely "pure" robusta.It won't look any different than what you can buy locally, and it would actually be less cold tolerant.If you are looking to ultimately have a thinner mature trunk,look for one with lots of red on the petiole base.

Unless you make the effort to actually travel and collect the seed from habitat,then grow it up yourself,there is no guarantee that you will ever be buying a "pure" washingtonia robusta.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coasta
8 hours ago, Tom in Tucson said:

Your best bet would be to drive to southern Sonora and hike up into a region called Nacapule Canyon. You should be able to find some pure stands of Washingtonia robusta there. Or if you are going to Baja California any of the wild stands of palms south of Mulege away from civilization should do. Any time of the year should be okay since the seeds have a long viability, but the seeds usually ripen September to November, and you will find more than you'll ever need.

Good luck in the hunt for purity!

Hi 106˚, Lo 62˚

Thank you Tom, wow thats quite an excursion lol. I appreciate the knowledge!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coasta
53 minutes ago, aztropic said:

While it's true that most of the washingtonia you find for sale will be hybrids to some degree,I can't understand the need for an absolutely "pure" robusta.It won't look any different than what you can buy locally, and it would actually be less cold tolerant.If you are looking to ultimately have a thinner mature trunk,look for one with lots of red on the petiole base.

Unless you make the effort to actually travel and collect the seed from habitat,then grow it up yourself,there is no guarantee that you will ever be buying a "pure" washingtonia robusta.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Hi Aztropic, thanks for the reply. My mindset about wanting a pure one or as pure as can be is to have a thinner trunk, including not having such a huge boot. One of the robustas I have planted currently, has a lot of red at the base of one of the leafs. Would this be a good example when you refer to petiole? 

Screenshot_20200508-082024_Gallery.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aztropic

Yes.That example leans more toward robusta but probably is not "pure" There really isn't going to be that much difference between a robusta type vs. pure robusta.If a couple inches one way or another is going to be a deal breaker,you may want to consider something that looks similar but has a known thinner trunk to begin with.Something like the Florida native sabal palmetto (cabbage palm), Copernicia berteroana,or even a mediterainian fan palm may be a better fit for the area you are trying to fill.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coasta
2 minutes ago, aztropic said:

Yes.That example leans more toward robusta but probably is not "pure" There really isn't going to be that much difference between a robusta type vs. pure robusta.If a couple inches one way or another is going to be a deal breaker,you may want to consider something that looks similar but has a known thinner trunk to begin with.Something like the Florida native sabal palmetto (cabbage palm), Copernicia berteroana,or even a mediterainian fan palm may be a better fit for the area you are trying to fill.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

Thank you very much Aztropic! I have actually have a chameleons humilis in the front yard I planted about a year and a half ago. My vision is to have to robustas growing behind the wall super tall and the royal palm in front of the wall. I will send a photo via private chat.  I will no longer search for a "pure robusta" but one with good characteristics and red on the petiole. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palmsOrl

I have access to loads of them.  If you pay shipping, I can send you say 20.  They are seedlings.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coasta
30 minutes ago, palmsOrl said:

I have access to loads of them.  If you pay shipping, I can send you say 20.  They are seedlings.

Thank you PalmsOrl, I will for sure keep that in mind if I am not able to find any local this weekend. :) I appreciate it!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
branislav

My impression from the latest research on these is that there is just one Washingtonia species that varies due to habitat characteristics. Starting in the north, they look a lot like filifera, and they get to look more and more like robusta as you go south. So if you want the thin one, make sure you get one sourced from as far south as possible. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coasta
3 hours ago, branislav said:

My impression from the latest research on these is that there is just one Washingtonia species that varies due to habitat characteristics. Starting in the north, they look a lot like filifera, and they get to look more and more like robusta as you go south. So if you want the thin one, make sure you get one sourced from as far south as possible. 

Thats really interesting. Could the amount of water a robusta receives affect the boot and the thickness?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave
11 hours ago, Coasta said:

Hi Aztropic, thanks for the reply. My mindset about wanting a pure one or as pure as can be is to have a thinner trunk, including not having such a huge boot. One of the robustas I have planted currently, has a lot of red at the base of one of the leafs. Would this be a good example when you refer to petiole? 

Screenshot_20200508-082024_Gallery.jpg

If that ain't pure, close enough. Plant out, WE HAVE LIFTOFF! (OHHH AHH, ETC.)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coasta
14 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

If that ain't pure, close enough. Plant out, WE HAVE LIFTOFF! (OHHH AHH, ETC.)

Thanks Doomsdave, this is the one I planted last year that I will be moving a little further away from the wall. I am going to go visit the same place tomorrow to see if they have another. :)

15889923683267579630407557687981.jpg

Edited by Coasta

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave
Just now, Coasta said:

Thanks Doomsdave, this is the one I planted last year that I will be moving a little further away from the wall. 

15889923683267579630407557687981.jpg

THAT LOOKS LIKE A FILIFERA, SORRY CAPS STUCK ON, DON'T MEAN TO SHOUT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coasta
2 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

THAT LOOKS LIKE A FILIFERA, SORRY CAPS STUCK ON, DON'T MEAN TO SHOUT

The confusing thing is that is the same palm! Lol. I'm not sure if it looks different because its in the shade?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

Yowza, don't look like the same one.

Yike a rooney

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coasta
2 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

Yowza, don't look like the same one.

Yike a rooney

I think also, it has gone through some rough time with transplant shock as well as getting used to the shade. It has been pretty slow. Are the leaf that are deeply cut what make it look like a filifera? Is it because of the thin petiole? Here is another old photo :). Thanks you BTW!20191003_060548.thumb.jpg.353765925fad2e2e10267a29cc748a9c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
branislav
On 5/8/2020 at 7:29 PM, Coasta said:

Thats really interesting. Could the amount of water a robusta receives affect the boot and the thickness?

Not sure. It looks like the adaptation might have been more fundamental so you can't mimic a filifera by watering a robusta a lot. But I am sure that these palms probably respond to watering like the rest do, within their generic limits.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Coasta
45 minutes ago, branislav said:

Not sure. It looks like the adaptation might have been more fundamental so you can't mimic a filifera by watering a robusta a lot. But I am sure that these palms probably respond to watering like the rest do, within their generic limits.

Thats great to know:)). Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • xoRudy
      By xoRudy
      I have two Washingtonia Palms in the back yard, I'm wondering what type I have. I have a 5 gal, which I'm pretty sure its a Robusta but on some days I think its a Filbusta. I also have a little seedling that I posted a while back, but its put out some new leafs. Filifera, Robusta, or Filbusta? 
      First 5 pics are the 5 gal
      Last 3 is the seedling








    • McClell.Col829
      By McClell.Col829
      Hello my Fellow Palm Talkers, I purchased a Washy (labeled as a Filifera, imo its a Filibusta) about a month ago from HD, I normally don't get my palms from big name corporations, however this palm was priced very low for its size and for the area I live in, St. George, Utah. It's been in the ground for a month, I've been good about watering it,  and I use fish emulsion fertilizer during planting, in my experience it usually helps reduce transplant shock. Anyways, I'm concerned about a couple of things, however the speckling on the petioles is my main concern. I'm wondering what it may be, and what I can do to treat it or remedy it. Any input, recommendations, thoughts and ideas will be greatly appreciated. I hope everybody is doing as well as they can during these stressful and challenging times! I hope you all stay safe and healthy! God Bless,
       
      Thanks
       
      Colby




    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      I have a 10" pot of 60+ seedlings of Ptychosperma robusta from my mother palm. About 10 years ago I bought a young clustering Ptychosperma at a sale. The seller called it "Ptychosperma robusta", which was not then and is not now a valid binomial, to my knowledge. He knew nothing else about it. When it was smaller I posted photos in hope someone on the forum would recognize it but got no response. Anyway it has grown quite large and so tall I can't easily photograph its crown. I remove its offsets to keep it at two stems that are 4-5" diameter each, quite chunky by Ptychosperma standards. It grows quickly, flowers and seeds easily and ripe fruit is vibrant red. The infructescences are so high up we can no longer reach them with ladders or pole saws. As a result seedlings pop up all around it in the jungle. The other day I dug up over 80 seedlings and rather than compost them, will find them a new home. I can say this unknown species is completely hardy here and took down to 38F last winter. I hope some enterprising palm lover can offer these seedlings a home. And I hope someone can give it a valid name if one exists. Seedlings will be sent via Priority Mail with roots wrapped in damp orchid moss, clear wrap and foil. Take  a leap into the unknown. See summary below
      Ptychosperma sp "Robusta": 60+ rooted seedlings @ $18.00 for the lot
      Shipping = $10.00 via Priority Mail.   No shipping outside the US. No shipping to HI
      TOTAL = $28.00
      Payment via Paypal
      PM me if you are interested
      TOTAL = $30.00
      Photos



      Mother palm

    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      Yesterday we returned home from our annual two-week stay at our timeshare on Fort Myers Beach. I took the following photos of the view outside our apt. at sunset on our last night on the beach. Silhouetted against the glowing sky are a coconut and a couple Washingtonias. May everyone's view be as glorious as this.
      Sunset at Ft. Myers Beach, 8-6-2020



    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      Yesterday we returned home from our annual two-week stay at our timeshare on Fort Myers Beach. I took the following photos of the view outside our apt. at sunset on our last night on the beach. Silhouetted against the glowing sky are a coconut and a couple Washingtonias. May everyone's view be as glorious as this.
      Sunset at Ft. Myers Beach, 8-6-2020



×
×
  • Create New...