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newtopalmsMD

Why is this yucca pink

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newtopalmsMD

This yucca has had pink tint for a couple of years.  Is this a nutrient deficiency? normal for young bright edge yuccas? or could it be the way it will grow?  ThanksIMG_3602.jpg.d0d73ee8dc0d1a905ff5dbfbc96eecb0.jpg

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Silas_Sancona
18 minutes ago, newtopalmsMD said:

This yucca has had pink tint for a couple of years.  Is this a nutrient deficiency? normal for young bright edge yuccas? or could it be the way it will grow?  ThanksIMG_3602.jpg.d0d73ee8dc0d1a905ff5dbfbc96eecb0.jpg

Perfectly normal. Some specimens of this variety will present more pink in the leaves than others..

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jimmyt

Is this a Yucca reveal party? :floor::blink:  I have seen blue ones too!  Sorry....   Just could not resist.  It is the quarantine insanity!

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Darold Petty

Any possibility that this plant is a Cordyline or Phormium ?  

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newtopalmsMD

Hi all,

Thanks for the replies

Darold, I can't verify that it's a yucca.  I bought a couple of red Texas yuccas two years ago on line (they are doing great) and the seller added this as a little bonus, and called it a yucca.  Also it has spent two winters in the pot outside with no problem, if that makes it more likely to be a yucca.  I do like the pink shading, and will pick a spot near the front of my garden if it will stay pink.  Otherwise I have a few larger color guard yuccas already!   

Thanks again

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Chester B

I've bought a bunch of variegated yuccas - filamentosa and gloriosa - that are like this.  For me they all end up losing the pink the first year.

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