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JLM

Pindo palms all around the neighborhood are flowering. If they do produce seeds, i thought about snagging a few and trying to germinate them. Again, IF they produce seeds. So the main question is when is the best time to collect seeds from them. There are several, atleast 10 total that is close to the street. Either way, i dont think they would care, my neighbors are higher in age and it would spare them of having to get rid of as many seeds.

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PalmatierMeg

Fruit of Butia odorata are yellow when ripe. Supposedly the fruit makes good jelly and can be fermented into wine. I've never tried them. Butias aren't common here and none of mine have yet to flower.

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aztropic

Best time to collect the seeds is when you see them falling onto the ground on their own. Flesh will be yellow,and has the consistency and taste of a mango. Most people cut the seed bracts off before the seeds ripen, though, to avoid the mess. These are generally slow to germinate and very slow as seedlings... Save yourself the headaches and pick up a 5 gallon specimen,that's already 5 years old, for $30 or less at any big box store. You'll be WAY ahead,believe me.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Tyrone

They do make a good wine. I've got a few vintages stored away in my makeshift cellar (cupboard). 

Butia seed takes its sweet old time to come up. Better to chuck the seed in a pot and forget them. Some may come up in the first year, then a few the next year and so on for who knows how long. They're in no hurry to do anything. If you want the satisfaction of growing your own Butias I say go ahead and germinate them. If you want a plant in a hurry just buy one. 

My two cents.

:)

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Fusca

Agree with the others but the fruits can vary in color and size.  I've seen mostly orange fruits in Texas but have also seen yellow and red fruits.  They vary in taste as well but not much - they are delicious and quite fibrous but also make great jelly (same with Queen palm fruits).  If you can't find plants for sale and you have access to several fruiting trees locally check the old leaf boots for seedlings.   Often times some fruits will land there and sprout because the trees produce so much fruit.  They transplant easily and this will save a couple years time.  If you want to try germinating seeds I've had better luck cracking the hard seed coat in a vise and planting the embryo inside after cold stratification in the refrigerator for a few weeks.  Often there are 3-4 in each seed.

Edited by Fusca
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Brad Mondel

Also you can eat the nuts inside the shell and they taste exactly like coconut meat. 

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kinzyjr

I picked a few of the fruit off the palm when they were yellow and had luck using the baggy method.  I put the seedling out in the yard to see how it would do after ~1 year in a small pot.  So far, it is hanging in there, but time will tell.

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JLM

Sorry for no response! I had notifications marked for this but did not get any. I guess i will be going to Lowes :)

I will try to find the smallest they have. I will also check HD and see if they have anything small. Thanks for the input!

Edited by JLM
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Steve in Florida

In your area they should be ripe in October, but it really depends on how early they finish flowering.

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JLM

Long story short I went to Lowes to buy a Pindo, but they didnt have them so I ended up with a Pygmy Date...

Edited by JLM

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Estlander
17 hours ago, JLM said:

Long story short I went to Lowes to buy a Pindo, but they didnt have them so I ended up with a Pygmy Date...

What’s your plan with the Pygmy Date? Plant it outside? These are 5F less cold hardy than Queens, so choose your location wisely. Good thing is, they’re easy to protect due to their size. 
My Pygmy Date is flowering right now. 

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B6DEF397-9680-44BE-B025-C0CE0F6AF130.jpeg

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JLM

I will get a pic on here soon. I put it close to the house. This will be the easiest palm to protect. 2.25 gallon. I love it because its a clump of 4!

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JLM

I have plans to put purple roses near it on each side. Cosmos flowers in between the palm and the roses and cosmos around the palm. Mulch will go in aswell with a rock border. All of the other sandy areas will be grass at some point!

20200506_163407.jpg

Edited by JLM
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Fusca

@JLM here is a pindo that I pulled out of the leaf boots of a mature tree about 5 years ago.  Meanwhile seeds I germinated that were collected later that same summer are just now going pinnate and are obviously much smaller and still in containers.  I wasn't sure if you were still hoping for a pindo so I thought I'd give you an idea of what to expect if you go with germinating vs purchasing or finding a germinated seed.  Livistona nitida in background was a strap leaf seedling when planted 2 years ago and roughly the same size as the pindo.

 

IMG_20200506_174217.jpg

Edited by Fusca
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JLM

@Estlander @Fusca this area literally went to hell. The roses are still doing great, but the Pygmy Dates got dug up and seperated, only 1 survivor out of the clump of 4 and i just had to move it AGAIN because of excessive water. Most of the mulch got washed away during the winter, and the weeds have taken over before ive had a chance to get a hold on them. This area will be fixed up again and look much better once the roof is replaced and we replace our gutters. Hoping for late July as an ETA for this little project. 

My Queens did okay this winter, every one of them sustained some sort of damage though this winter, all of them have had a spear problem but have already pushed past that, new fronds already emerging, the fronds that sustained the damage look funky but whatever. Ive done several plantings and transplants this Spring already. Starting with planting my Majesty and elephant ears, planted the lone survivor Pygmy Date, which got transplanted. I transplanted my Red Maple to the backyard (its still small). I have also planted my Butia as of this afternoon. More landscape projects left, we are going to get our big tree stump in the front yard grinded soon so that will make the place look 10x better in of itself. The plan changed a little bit with the stump area once it gets grinded. Lots of stuff to do here, and i am determined to get it done this summer!

As for the Pindo seeds, i planted a nice sized one that costed $80 from a local nursery, and plus the seeds were not ripe enough to do anything yet anyways, so that would have been a fail regardless. We now have a nice little group of palms in the front yard (2 Queens, 1 Pindo, 1 Pygmy Date for now). 

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Dartolution

If I remember correctly they seem to mature around mid August - mid September around the gulf coast. 

The ones locally mature around the same time -late august or so. 

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bar

This is an old post, but since it's back:

I have a Butia capitata that produces so many seeds each year, it's a big pain.  Yes, I've made Pindo Palm sorbet, and Pindo Palm syrup, and it's great but it is a LOT of work to get the juice out of those seeds, let me tell you.   Even with a big tree, the flower stalks are pretty accessible, so I often cut them off just as they emerge, to prevent all that seed litter.  I find they taste a bit astringent.

As for seedlings, I must have pulled out over 200 seedlings this spring coming up around the tree.  I left just the two biggest ones to pot up and give away.  

Bruce

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Laaz

The BEST time to collect them is after they germinate. Many fruit drop into the old boots of the trees & germinate there.  All you have to do is gently tug them out.

OLYMPUS-DIGITAL-CAMERA.jpg

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