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Jimbean

Dypsis lutescens invasive?

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Jimbean

I'm seeing this more and more in Brevard.  This is one such example, by far not the only one.  I've seen them naturalize in Palm Beach and Martin counties as well.  Has anyone else noticed? 

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Really full garden

They do produce abundant crops of seeds. I have only found sprouting seeds very near mother plants. Nothing here in Guatemala seems to disperse the seeds.

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mnorell

I really never have noticed sprouted seeds of Dypsis lutescens in the Florida Keys. The big exception being after Hurricane Irma soaked us with 5' of ocean for 12+ hours and battered us with 160+mph winds. This actually heavily damaged, or killed outright, the majority of D. lutescens in our area of Big Pine Key. However, one bizarre thing was that around these dead clumps, there were hundreds of sprouting seedlings. I really wonder if it was the saltwater or some other factor that caused this to happen. But just as strangely, virtually all of these seedlings eventually died.

This photo, taken a couple of blocks from our house on Big Pine Key on 31 December 2017 (three and a half months after the storm), shows the typical appearance in our area of Dypsis lutescens. If you look closely on the ground amidst the debris in the right portion of the frame, you will see what look like thick blades of grass. These were all seedlings of D. lutescens. Though none of the seedlings made it, some of the seemingly dead clumps in this photo have since put out one solitary stem or in a couple of cases one of the large aerial canes was able to put out a new leaf and get going again. But this used to be a huge, dense and beautiful stand of the palm. (Meanwhile, the few D. pembana in our area came through with no damage whatsoever from the saltwater inundation and wind-load. Lesson learned!)

Dypsis lutescens 2017_12_31 IMG_4345.jpg

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kinzyjr

Haven't seen any in the wild here, but there are a lot of mature specimens that are setting seed so it's certainly not out of the realm of possibility that I'll be hiking through the woods and see one here or elsewhere in the county.

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palmsOrl

I've never seen this but I haven't been to Brevard County natural areas lately.  We have quite a few larger Dypsis lutescens n Orlando proper now, but I see much fewer with a lot of size on them in the suburbs.  Never seen any seeds or seedlings here.

I would actually like one for my container ranch.

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redant

Weeds, they sprout everywhere in my yard from only 1 plant.

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sonoranfans

We see no obvious naturalization here.  Naturalized palms here are mainly phoenix and appear to be sylvestris, reclinata, or rupicola hybrids.   These could easily be considered invasive here.

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Jimbean
2 hours ago, redant said:

Weeds, they sprout everywhere in my yard from only 1 plant.

Same here.  My neighbor has two mature specimens, and seedlings sprout all over my side yard.  They readily volunteer in any local habitat, such as scrub, hardwood forest, pine/saw palmetto forest, etc. The biggest volunteer specimen I have seen was near Turkey Creek in Palm Bay that looks nearly mature and about to flower.

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Jimbean

I took two pictures last week while hiking in the Palm Bay area.  Now that I look for them in Turkey Creek, Malabar scrub, and any general wooded location, they are everywhere.  I'm pretty sure these will be invasive;  Even the 1989 freeze did not kill many of them here in Brevard from what I was told.

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WaianaeCrider

Have not seen any here on O`ahu.  But as an avid hiker I've hiked stream beds and ridges looking at Royal's by the hundreds.  Licuala chinensis also all over many Ko`olau valleys (behind Honolulu)  Also a number of stream beds and valley sides have Pinanga coronata- all over them.  the royals have been around since early last century.  Palms like the Pinanga and others I think came after Ho`omaluhia Botanical Garden opened I thing birds are spreading small seeded palms into the Ko`olau Mts.

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