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donofriojim1

Cincinnati palms part 2

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donofriojim1

In my previous post, I shared some pictures of some established needle palms that were planted at a Cincinnati restaurant in about 2009 that never get any special protection of any kind. Here are some pictures that were taken by another local palm enthusiast and shared with me. These pics show the needle palms during the freeze of January, 2019.

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kinzyjr

@donofriojim1 Thank you for sharing!  It's great to see the planting range of our native palms expanded!

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Silas_Sancona

Agree w/ Kinsyjr... Not something i'd have expected to see up that way.. Lived on the east side of the 275 ( Milford/ Mulberry area )  for roughly 6 years, and worked / frequently traveled through areas east of a line extending from Downtown, up to Forest Park often. Also had extended family who lived just south of downtown in Covington (KY) at that time.

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Allen

Nice I have 6 of these now.

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AndyMac7

Very cool, however, I'm always wondering if people mistake needle palms for Yucca. Honestly, they can look so bushy, they can almost look like grass. If I ever plant one here, I think I would try and keep it very trimmed at the base for more of a "palmy" look. Although, as I understand, that can reduce their hardiness by uncovering the ground a bit. I suppose that's what mulch is for :). 

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PalmTreeDude
15 minutes ago, AndyMac7 said:

Very cool, however, I'm always wondering if people mistake needle palms for Yucca. Honestly, they can look so bushy, they can almost look like grass. If I ever plant one here, I think I would try and keep it very trimmed at the base for more of a "palmy" look. Although, as I understand, that can reduce their hardiness by uncovering the ground a bit. I suppose that's what mulch is for :). 

Trimming green palm fronds causes palms to not get as many nutrients as they should, which can result in them growing slower and thinner. They actually get a palm appearance when they get bigger. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
Typo

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AndyMac7
53 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Trimming green palm fronds causes palms to not get as many nutrients as they should, which can result in them growing slower and thinner. They actually get a palm appearance when they get bigger. 

Ahh, well good point @PalmTreeDude, I know that you're not supposed to trim the green ones, but I'm saying when they start wilting and you have plenty of crown it shouldn't hinder them. Just not a fan of the super "bushy" look, that's all.

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