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Hedyscepe canterburyana

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joe_OC

Hedyscepe canterburyana palms are one of my favorites.  That's why I have 5 of them in my garden.  My oldest one is finally got a few rings of trunk on it:

 

 

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PalmatierMeg

Beautiful! Wish I could grow them here.

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akamu

You have great taste Joe these are awesome here's my mine with few rings of trunk hopefully others with larger specimens will share there's also. Hard to get a good picture in the downpour of rain today 

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joe_OC

Thanks, Adam.  I have one that is a dud.  Almost 10 years in the ground and is slow.  

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akamu

I agree these are slow killed two before I got this one to grow I have seen a few in SoCal that are seeding and they are awesome

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DoomsDave

They are the most 

ALONG THE COAST!

Inland, okay I guess

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Tracy
1 hour ago, akamu said:

I agree these are slow killed two before I got this one to grow I have seen a few in SoCal that are seeding and they are awesome

Adam I killed 2 here in Leucadia, but have 2 in Carlsbad that are still going but slow.  It is strange because I have palms that put out fewer new leaves per year that have gained far more size.  My Howea belmoreana's in Carlsbad were planted at the same time and 2 have ringed trunk and they are in a planter immediately above the H canterburyana.  My oldest is about 10 years in the ground from a 7 gallon size, but is only a fraction the size of yours and Joe's.  Glad to see you and Joe are having success!

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akamu
1 hour ago, DoomsDave said:

They are the most 

ALONG THE COAST!

Inland, okay I guess

I totally agree the one's I've seen growing on the coast grow much easier.  I am 8 Miles Inland so I think I'm right on the edge. Bill Sanford made the quote years ago the "hedyscepe complex" if I remember right he was  referring to some grow good and some languish so try try again until one makes it.

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TomJ
6 hours ago, joe_OC said:

Hedyscepe canterburyana palms are one of my favorites.  That's why I have 5 of them in my garden.  My oldest one is finally got a few rings of trunk on it:

 

 

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How big when acquired, how long in ground.  

Observations on requirements. 

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joe_OC

Hi Tom,

The Hedyscepe is the palm on the right in the photo below.  It was in Summer 2010.  The other photo shows how much the double Chambeyronia has grown in the same amount of time.   This palm likes a lot of water and is a heavy feeder.  It started to speed up once I increased my watering for it as well as aggressively fertilizing it.   For the longest time it would only give me a frond a year, but now I am getting 2-3 fronds.  The palm benefits from morning sun and shade in the afternoon.  

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Edited by joe_OC
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joe_OC

Here's a better picture to show the difference in growth rates:  Chambeyronia on the left and Hedyscepe on the right.

IMG_0602.jpg

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Jim in Los Altos

Grew mine from tiny seedlings. It’s taken about 15 years to get to this size but growth really speeds up after trunk rings appear. 

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Palm Tree Jim

I have had NO luck growing these........nice work!

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DoomsDave
19 minutes ago, Palm Tree Jim said:

I have had NO luck growing these........nice work!

Me too.

I think we’re both in the same just-a-bit-too-far-inland type of microclimate.

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TomJ
10 hours ago, joe_OC said:

Hi Tom,

The Hedyscepe is the palm on the right in the photo below.  It was in Summer 2010.  The other photo shows how much the double Chambeyronia has grown in the same amount of time.   This palm likes a lot of water and is a heavy feeder.  It started to speed up once I increased my watering for it as well as aggressively fertilizing it.   For the longest time it would only give me a frond a year, but now I am getting 2-3 fronds.  The palm benefits from morning sun and shade in the afternoon.  

DSC_0051 (1).JPG

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Nice.

I have a couple in the ground.

My observations are identical to yours. I think a lot of people under water these.

It looks like the sun is finally out so maybe I'll take a couple pictures.

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akamu

 that looks really good Jim your rings of trunk are much farther apart than mine maybe I need to add more water I like the dog photo bombing the picture

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TomJ

This was planted 12 years ago from a 1 gallon.

First 5 or so years seemed to stand still.

The mark on the spear is from this last Spring Equinox.

The B. Hapala next to it was planted at least 2 years later.

Always wet feet 100% clay.

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joe_OC

Nice!  Were those the ones Josh was selling?  

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TomJ
1 hour ago, joe_OC said:

Nice!  Were those the ones Josh was selling?  

yes.

I put the link to the add in the post....  think I got last one he had

The single one has sped up a lot last 3 years

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Jim in Los Altos
5 hours ago, akamu said:

 that looks really good Jim your rings of trunk are much farther apart than mine maybe I need to add more water I like the dog photo bombing the picture

I found out a few years ago that tons of water is the secret. Mine have experienced quite a number of 100° summer heat days, even once at 113°F! I never ever let the soil dry at all. I water even in winter when we haven’t had rain for a week. The one in the photo is generating four to five leaves yearly now. 

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Edited by Jim in Los Altos
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James B

Beautiful palm Joe. Don’t think I could pull off here. And Chambeyronia is as slow as I want to go in my garden lol. I have a Kentiopsis Pyriformis that unbearably slow. I imagine Hedyscepe would be similar but unable to take my summer heat here. 

 

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joe_OC
51 minutes ago, James B said:

Beautiful palm Joe. Don’t think I could pull off here. And Chambeyronia is as slow as I want to go in my garden lol. I have a Kentiopsis Pyriformis that unbearably slow. I imagine Hedyscepe would be similar but unable to take my summer heat here. 

 

James...Maybe treat it as an understory palm?  Just keep it well watered.  Mark McGinnis has 1-5 gal palms.  Definitely worth a try.

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James B
8 minutes ago, joe_OC said:

James...Maybe treat it as an understory palm?  Just keep it well watered.  Mark McGinnis has 1-5 gal palms.  Definitely worth a try.

Hmmm. I’m considering it. Would it make it through 110 degree plus in summer under canopy?

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James B
5 hours ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

I found out a few years ago that tons of water is the secret. Mine have experienced quite a number of 100° summer heat days, even once at 113°F! I never ever let the soil dry at all. I water even in winter when we haven’t had rain for a week. The one in the photo is generating four to five leaves yearly now. 

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113??? I had read it’s not very heat tolerant but that’s what makes this forum great. You get feedback from actual growers in their gardens and so many palms are tougher than they are given credit for.

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Jim in Los Altos
35 minutes ago, James B said:

113??? I had read it’s not very heat tolerant but that’s what makes this forum great. You get feedback from actual growers in their gardens and so many palms are tougher than they are given credit for.

Well, we get an occasional heat wave here in the Bay Area but my climate here isn’t terribly hot most of the summer. I’d guess that lots of heat with little nighttime cooldown would pretty much doom a Hedescepe. Notice how my summer nights remain cool. I think that’s key. 

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Jim in Los Altos
46 minutes ago, James B said:

Hmmm. I’m considering it. Would it make it through 110 degree plus in summer under canopy?

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Wow, Our climates are similar temperature wise. I think you should be able to grow Hedescepe in the shade without too much trouble. Remember, they need lots of water. 

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Tyrone

In habitat these grow more as an understory palm at the lower altitudinal range (around 450m asl) and only seem to like emerging from the canopy from about 650m asl. At the 875m asl mark on the top of Mt Gower they are in cloud moss forest and would likely never see above 22C (72F) ever. This is Leppidorachis territory. At the lowest elevation they'd likely never see above 25C (77F). At the highest elevation in summer, night temps would be around 17C avg in summer (63F) and the lowest elevation more like 20C (68F) always with very high humidity all year round. What they wouldn't want is dry soil, and hot nights with low humidity like what you would get with a Santa Ana event. I had trouble growing these in Perth with the hot summer easterlies. It didn't matter how much I watered some would just rot for no apparent reason. 

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joe_OC

All of my palms are second generation California grown.   One of them is a descendent from Karel Havlicek's Hedyscepe.  I also have a Leppidorachis growing in the garden.  It opened three fronds last year and is looking to do the same this year.  Soil never gets dry for any of these palms.  

59 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

In habitat these grow more as an understory palm at the lower altitudinal range (around 450m asl) and only seem to like emerging from the canopy from about 650m asl. At the 875m asl mark on the top of Mt Gower they are in cloud moss forest and would likely never see above 22C (72F) ever. This is Leppidorachis territory. At the lowest elevation they'd likely never see above 25C (77F). At the highest elevation in summer, night temps would be around 17C avg in summer (63F) and the lowest elevation more like 20C (68F) always with very high humidity all year round. What they wouldn't want is dry soil, and hot nights with low humidity like what you would get with a Santa Ana event. I had trouble growing these in Perth with the hot summer easterlies. It didn't matter how much I watered some would just rot for no apparent reason. 

 

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Hilo Jason

Great photos everyone!  These are amazing palms. I have a couple small ones in pots here that I hope to plant out soon. Not much to look at yet so instead I’ll post a few habitat photos below. 

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Tyrone
4 hours ago, joe_OC said:

All of my palms are second generation California grown.   One of them is a descendent from Karel Havlicek's Hedyscepe.  I also have a Leppidorachis growing in the garden.  It opened three fronds last year and is looking to do the same this year.  Soil never gets dry for any of these palms.  

 

Your Hedyscepe look very happy so you are definitely doing it right. Got any pics of your Leppie??

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Darold Petty

More habitat photos, featuring Troy Donovan ! :winkie:

 

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Tassie_Troy1971

My largest Hedyscepe canterburyana was grown from seed collected in the garden of Robert De Jong "pogobob" in September 2010 in San Clemente Ca . It now has 2 rings of trunk and does at least 4 leaves a year.

 

Troy :greenthumb:

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Tyrone
On 4/14/2020 at 10:02 PM, Darold Petty said:

More habitat photos, featuring Troy Donovan ! :winkie:

 

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I was meant to be there again this week. Thanks for nothing COVID-19.:angry:

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Tyrone
20 minutes ago, Tassie_Troy1971 said:

My largest Hedyscepe canterburyana was grown from seed collected in the garden of Robert De Jong "pogobob" in September 2010 in San Clemente Ca . It now has 2 rings of trunk and does at least 4 leaves a year.

 

Troy :greenthumb:

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That is some happy Hedyscepe.  In full sun too.

I'm too scared to do that to mine so they are in part shade. Did yours burn at any time?? I'm curious because I might be able to try some more sun on a few more I've got coming up now.

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Tassie_Troy1971

They seem fine in full sun here once they get over say 60 cm

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PalmCode

Wow, that's an amazing looking hedy Troy, well done . Can't wait till my ones get that size.

My largest is 140 cm high and puts out two leaves a year. The summer sun burns them quite easy here, so part sun seems the safer bet.

 

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Tyrone
36 minutes ago, PalmCode said:

Wow, that's an amazing looking hedy Troy, well done . Can't wait till my ones get that size.

My largest is 140 cm high and puts out two leaves a year. The summer sun burns them quite easy here, so part sun seems the safer bet.

 

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Yours are looking great too.

I think part shade would be better for my Hedyscepe then if yours can burn at 38S in the sun. I'm 35S so about 300km further north and we can get the hot dry northerlies with temps close to 40C on occasion.

I've got a couple of R sapida var Chatham Islands and a R bauerii that I'm hoping will sun harden a bit but my R bauerii objected a bit to our summer sun. It did come straight out of a shade house though. I'm trying to ride that fine line between growing it as fast and as robust as possible but without burning it. 

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PalmCode

Yeah you're climate is much more extreme than mine...I'm in a valley inland so temps can be hotter and colder compared to being by the coast in Auckland, where I've seen healthy full sun Hedyscepe

If your rhopalostylis came strait out of a shade house that is to be expected, how old is it?

If you don't mind the gamble and have a spare hedyscepe to experiment with, pick your favorite spot and see what happens. 
You can shade cloth over the top to train them into the sun gradually. But likely part shade/ full shade it is if you want tidy hedys and rhopies bro.

 

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Tyrone
36 minutes ago, PalmCode said:

Yeah you're climate is much more extreme than mine...I'm in a valley inland so temps can be hotter and colder compared to being by the coast in Auckland, where I've seen healthy full sun Hedyscepe

If your rhopalostylis came strait out of a shade house that is to be expected, how old is it?

If you don't mind the gamble and have a spare hedyscepe to experiment with, pick your favorite spot and see what happens. 
You can shade cloth over the top to train them into the sun gradually. But likely part shade/ full shade it is if you want tidy hedys and rhopies bro.

 

The R bauerii at a guess is maybe 15 years old and was about 2m tall in quite a small pot for its size. I planted it in luxurious soil and have surrounded it by tree ferns and Archontophoenix so even though it's the tallest in the area now, it will eventually become mid canopy, as everything else is starting to take off a bit quicker than it. It has opened up a couple of leaves since last September and the last one has opened into the shade of the house so looks great. Its on the south side of the house so the shadows are quite long now.

I would love to try a Hedyscepe in the same garden area as its right outside our kitchen window and the approach to our house. I might have to modify the garden bed a bit to provide some dappled light to a Hedyscepe somewhere in there. I have a Dypsis ambositrae not doing too well in that garden area. I might put that back into a pot and leave space for a Hedyscepe in time.

I'm also in a valley about 13m above sea level but 9km inland. The surrounding area is about 40m above sea level, so I get hotter during the day and colder at night than Albany itself which is right on Princess Royal Harbour. The valley also runs east west, so we get the roaring easterlies and then the roaring westerlies. Sometimes even in the same day.

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