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aztropic

Coccothrinax boschiana / Pseudophoenix ekmanii

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aztropic

Collected a few seeds from the palms we visited on a recent trip to the Dominican Republic.In less than 3 weeks,both of these species are already sprouting!

Fresh seed sure does have its advantages. :)

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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aztropic

Coccothrinax boschiana

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aztropic

Pseudophoenix ekmanii

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palmad Merc
On 3/11/2020 at 4:21 AM, aztropic said:

Collected a few seeds from the palms we visited on a recent trip to the Dominican Republic.In less than 3 weeks,both of these species are already sprouting!

Fresh seed sure does have its advantages. :)

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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How did you go about germinating the pseudophoenix ekmanii, are they just thrown the ground? 

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aztropic

Heck no! Everything is sterilized;water,soil,seeds,and containers. Propagation chambers are kept at 90F soil temp.Seeds are too rare to take chances with...When's the last time you ever saw Coccothrinax boschiana available;plants or seeds?

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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aztropic

The habitat that these 2 species live in is soo remote,there is no other reason to be there other than to look at the trees.The small populations that only exist in these specific areas will still be safe for many years to come.

This is what our 4X4 rental car looked like after a car wash at the end of our trip.Pretty much totaled by rental standards. It only had 2 small scratches when we picked it up.We had to hire a paint shop to buff out the entire car before we could even THINK about trying to turn it back in...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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GMann

Nice! Congratulations on getting the seeds to sprout!

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aztropic

Here is Coccothrinax boschiana, 7 weeks from sowing.Now the real challenge begins... (trying to grow them to 1 gallon size where they should be safe) If successful,I'll bring you one GMann.(figure about 4 or 5 years...) :)

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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aztropic

Coccothrinax boschiana - planted the seeds almost 3 months ago.Between 1 and 2 inches tall at this point. Still going...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Frond-friend42

Very cool..  Do you keep the seeds under light?How about the ekmanii?

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aztropic

Seeds are now outdoors in a greenhouse. Pseudophoenix ekmanii seeds are much larger and are bigger,stronger,plants than the tiny seeds of Coccothrinax boschiana.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Meangreen94z
On 3/12/2020 at 11:08 AM, aztropic said:

The habitat that these 2 species live in is soo remote,there is no other reason to be there other than to look at the trees.The small populations that only exist in these specific areas will still be safe for many years to come.

This is what our 4X4 rental car looked like after a car wash at the end of our trip.Pretty much totaled by rental standards. It only had 2 small scratches when we picked it up.We had to hire a paint shop to buff out the entire car before we could even THINK about trying to turn it back in...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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That’s awesome. I’ve read in the past the Dominican Republic has the highest auto accident fatality rate in the world. I’m sure the style/condition of roads factors in, granted you were in a remote location.

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aztropic

Roads are actually in as good a shape as ours in the USA. Problem is that most people seem to commute by moped and small motorcycle over there;swarming through,alongside,and in and out of traffic;always just inches away from becoming a fatality.Red lights and stop signs are merely taken as a suggestion as most people give 2 toots on the horn and plow on through.Seems there are no rules of the road,and nobody to enforce them if there were...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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aztropic

Some of the typical transportation used in the Dominican Republic.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Meangreen94z

That makes sense. How many Coccothrinax boschiana ended up germinating for you? Any idea on hardiness? Probably 30*F or slightly under?

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aztropic

I probably have at least 25 seeds germinated at this time. VERY delicate blades of grass now,best left in their germinating box.Tried transplanting 10 seeds shortly after they sprouted to individual pots and only have 3 of those surviving. These are remote germinaters and produce a 3" plus root out of their tiny seed, before any green shoot.

Next winter,I will experiment with hardiness.In their natural environment,they probably never see below 55F.Mature fronds are very stiff though, and should survive a light freeze.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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aztropic

Tried a few of the boschiana seeds in jiffy pots too.This was probably a better way to go to avoid root disturbance,but by the looks of things,as soon as I see a sprout,it is already ready for a 1 gallon pot! Seems like overkill to plant a bb sized seed with a 1/2mm sprout into that large a pot, but that is what the root system is screaming for.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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aztropic

Seeds are tiny! Only about 4mm wide each.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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Meangreen94z

It might grow dramatically faster in a oversized container. I know certain palms wait to have a large stable root system before above ground growth takes off .

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aztropic

4 months out now from collecting and planting the seeds in a community pot.Like popping popcorn,germination seems to be about done.Time to pot up these seedlings with their giant root systems into individual 1 gallon pots! :)

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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WaianaeCrider

Can't imagine how old those Pseudophoenix ekmanii  are.  Mine is about 2' tall after 20 years in the ground.  I'll admit it didn't get a lot of water or sun during those years.  Will try to remember to take a picture tomorrow.

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WaianaeCrider
On 6/19/2020 at 6:21 PM, WaianaeCrider said:

Can't imagine how old those Pseudophoenix ekmanii  are.  Mine is about 2' tall after 20 years in the ground.  I'll admit it didn't get a lot of water or sun during those years.  Will try to remember to take a picture tomorrow.

Got it today.  I'm sitting at the same level as the palm.  22 years in the ground.

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Meangreen94z

I’m sure in a lot of ways that’s extremely disappointing. Maybe increase watering?

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hbernstein

That ekmanii doesn't look robust. Even the young plants are thick little palms. To me, it doesn't look like the species.

 They are slow, but not that slow. It should also have a thicker caliper and thicker, stiffer leaves.

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aztropic

Definitely an ekmanii.While other Pseudophoenix species grow reasonably well under desert conditions,ekmanii seems to be the exception.I grew a batch of these from seed and have trialed them under many different exposures around my yard with little success.Some die outright,some hang on and always look bad,and some plod on,growing only 1 new frond every two years.Here are a few pics of mine...

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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aztropic

Plain old desert grown sargentii, on the other hand, can look as good as they do in Florida.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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WaianaeCrider
On 6/22/2020 at 9:02 AM, hbernstein said:

That ekmanii doesn't look robust. Even the young plants are thick little palms. To me, it doesn't look like the species.

 They are slow, but not that slow. It should also have a thicker caliper and thicker, stiffer leaves.

Yea I've abused it w/not enough water.

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aztropic

Seedling update... Typical examples of the seedlings,6 months after germination.

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aztropic

A planted ekmanii from a previous batch. Unfotunately,can't recommend this species for Arizona,although sister species sargentii is a definite winner here.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

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