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PalmCode

Growing Dictyosperma album in 9b/10a zones In Australia or New Zealand

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PalmCode

Just curious if anyone here has had any success growing Dictyosperma album in any 9b/10a zones In Australia or NZ? Is it possible? I just found a tag I kept from buying three seedlings from a Bunnings store in Auckland around 13 years ago when I was first getting into palms. 

They all died from me neglecting them... Wish I had my time over. I feel like I could have grown them a lot better with what I know now but I Haven't found any more for sale here to try again.

Show us some photos If you have any of these palms.

100_5919aa.jpg

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tim_brissy_13

There used to be one in a Melbourne nursery for years. It was in nearly complete shade with good canopy and right next to a large pond/water feature. It was probably a good microclimate but always looked pretty good from memory. I’ve been keen to try one here and might do if I can get my hands on one. I’d definitely give it a go in Auckland considering other palms I saw thriving over there when I visited, although lack of year round warmth might be your limiting factor. 

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PalmCode
3 hours ago, kinzyjr said:

@PalmCode

I think this might be one here in Lakeland, FL: Possible Dictyosperma

If it is, it has just about doubled in size in a year.

From here that does look like one. Growing Great out in the open there.

 

2 hours ago, tim_brissy_13 said:

There used to be one in a Melbourne nursery for years. It was in nearly complete shade with good canopy and right next to a large pond/water feature. It was probably a good microclimate but always looked pretty good from memory. I’ve been keen to try one here and might do if I can get my hands on one. I’d definitely give it a go in Auckland considering other palms I saw thriving over there when I visited, although lack of year round warmth might be your limiting factor. 

Very cool. Do you know roughly how tall it got? Definitely give it a go if you can find some.

 

 

I remember the ones I brought had the red stripes and were growing fine until I planted them out in the open with no good over cover / soil ect. Wish I had tried to grow them in pots for a few years. Then plant out in my best micro climate. But then again I've never seen any growing in New Zealand. Maybe upper northland would have the most realistic chance.

Edited by PalmCode
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pietropuccio

No problem in Palermo, Italy (zone 9b, Mediterranean climate):

 

Dictyosperma IPS.jpg

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PalmCode

@pietropuccio 

Awesome. Grows great in your climate.

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Tyrone

I planted one this year. I had it in a bag thru winter under my patio next to my Satakentia. It grew slowly thru winter but this year will be the test. It’s in a frost free section of the garden with plenty of winter sun. It’s looking very good now. How it looks in October will be the real answer.

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pietropuccio
21 hours ago, PalmCode said:

@pietropuccio 

Awesome. Grows great in your climate.

Thanks!

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The Germinator

I know I am not down under but I do live in 10a and this palm has taken the cold winter nights and drying summer winds. i purchased a batch of seedlings and this one has survived over the years.

dictyosperma_album_specimen_PORTRAIT.jpg

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Merlyn2220

I bought a batch of seedlings of the "Rubrum" type 2 years ago.  They all took variable leaf damage at a couple of 33-36F cold fronts, and were in a semi-protected area near the house.  Other seedlings like Latania Lontaroides croaked immediately, but these grow out of it reasonably quickly.  I'm sure if we hit mid 20s they'd all die at this age, since they are not even pinnate yet.

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PalmCode

@Merlyn2220

They should be able to handle the cold  in the Orlando area if you can get them to a larger pinnate stage right? ....I don't recall spotting any when I visited Orlando in 2016. Although it was awesome seeing all the Bismarckia there.

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Merlyn2220
39 minutes ago, PalmCode said:

@Merlyn2220 They should be able to handle the cold  in the Orlando area if you can get them to a larger pinnate stage right? ....I don't recall spotting any when I visited Orlando in 2016. Although it was awesome seeing all the Bismarckia there.

Reports are variable in the "Freeze Damage Data" section, some say severe damage or defoliation below 30F (especially with frost), dead at 25F, and also perfectly ok at 26F in Jacksonville, FL.  Since mine had about 50% leaf damage at 33F as strap-leaves, I am hopeful that they'll do okay in my borderline 9b/9a area just NW of Orlando.  I hit 27-28F almost every year, so if they can handle that without severe damage then they'll be fine!

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redant

Have them in my 9b/10a for 18 years, haven't lost one yet.

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kinzyjr

This specimen at Lake Wire has been around since at least late 2010 so it has seen temperatures into the 20s.  It's a little over-trimmed in the photograph.

 

0013_Dictyosperma_album.jpg

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sonoranfans

that last one looks like conjugatum/furfurcea they are notably slower growers than rubrum.  I have 3 seedlings of each and the rubrum are growing much faster.  As far as cold hardiness, whent he roots are tapped in and the bud is a little above ground(trunking) it will get better.  I'd protect them till they get a foot or two of clear trunk.  Seedlings are NEVER as cold hardy as established juvenile palms.  A smaller bud cools off faster and the air temp will often drop lower closer to the ground.  A little hot rock cools off faster than a big one.  If you dont protect till  they are established, you might want to keep some backups in containers that are protected.

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gtsteve

I had a little one die here, many years ago in winter. The lows are not that low, it never gets to freezing here,

but it does stay cold for a good month, with the days not warming much and often in winter with a lot of cold wind.

Also my fault that I planted it in winter too, looking back it probably never had a chance.

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kinzyjr

Looks like the extended chill may be more detrimental than a freeze.  At the very least, the palms I posted above have taken a windy (~10-15mph sustained, 25mph gusts) advective freeze down to 28F and staying below freezing for at least 9 hours.  Looking at the Auckland climate, the all-time low on Wikipedia is only 25F.  I'd say give it a roll of the dice @PalmCode - and share the results please. :D

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Daryl

var conjugatum are a lot more leaf hardy than the other forms as well...

 

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PalmCode

@kinzyjr I'm  definitely keen to try again if can find some seedlings or seeds. It's likely it's too cold over winter here for them but you never know you might get lucky.

 

Thanks for your info and pics everyone. These are one of my favorite palms.

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Daryl

My young var conjugatum, and other forms behind it. Last winter was weird, with many clear cool nights...no frost but temps down to about 5C (40F) on occasion, and many nights below 10C (50F). The regular forms actually had some minor marking but the conjugatum was perfect...

DSC_0546.thumb.jpg.42ceefa78ac4ca9840c4e35f76b32edc.jpg

 

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