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RyManUtah

Utah Yard Projects

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Silas_Sancona
2 minutes ago, RyManUtah said:

Thanks for the tip! 1/3 of the back grass will be a pool at some point. (The random white lines in the photos). When I go to put that in, I may just have it cut all of it and sell it. Sod is pretty pricy around here. I haven’t decided if it’s worth the hassle yet. 

Having done sod installation/ removal for roughly 5 years, renting a sod cutter is the easiest way to remove large areas..  Good idea on offering it up to others who might want some.  You considering bringing in soil / sandy gravel to create mounds for some of the planting areas?

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RyManUtah
27 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Having done sod installation/ removal for roughly 5 years, renting a sod cutter is the easiest way to remove large areas..  Good idea on offering it up to others who might want some.  You considering bringing in soil / sandy gravel to create mounds for some of the planting areas?

I don’t know why kind of grass it is. I don’t care much for grass. I see it as a waste of space and water ha. Its very wide blades and doesn’t go dormant in winter though. The roots went down a good several inches further than expected when I planted today. 
 

Yes I will be. I will use whatever I dig from the pool area first, though. I will likely amend it while laying it. You know how the “soil” can be haha. That way I don’t have to haul of away. I want to do high mount areas, dry drainage slopes and several sizes of rock. 
 

another reason I planted the Brahea pretty high. So he doesn’t need adjusted when he becomes a bigger mount. 

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AZPalms
32 minutes ago, RJ said:

So I saw that Phil from Jungle music has these on sale, and he's the only one I see that ever has them. What's your take on these? 

Local nursery grows them from seed here from their own trees. I can pick them up for about $50 for a 15g. They’re bulletproof here in AZ. Full sun, medium water, easy grow. I would say it’s a medium grower speed wise. Nice looking palm!

There is a debate on Blackburniana is actually a subspecies or a variation of S. bermudana or another Sabal. I think it’ll be a decent sized to large palm. The nursery that grows these has larger ones, not sure on age but it’s decently sized. 

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Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, RyManUtah said:

I don’t know why kind of grass it is. I don’t care much for grass. I see it as a waste of space and water ha. Its very wide blades and doesn’t go dormant in winter though. The roots went down a good several inches further than expected when I planted today. 
 

Yes I will be. I will use whatever I dig from the pool area first, though. I will likely amend it while laying it. You know how the “soil” can be haha. That way I don’t have to haul of away. I want to do high mount areas, dry drainage slopes and several sizes of rock. 

Oh, i hear ya.. Even back east where lawns fit the ideal landscape more, never understood why people wasted so much space for a lawn they never used.. Some of the homes we took care of when i lived in Ohio had 1/2-2 acre ..lawns.. I'd stand in a couple yards while cleaning out beds thinking about what a waste of space it was.. 

My casual guess would be some sort of Blue Grass or some type of Tall Fescue.. especially since neither go dormant in winter. Can't imagine they'd use Bermuda up there ( Count your blessings they don't, lol ) and yes, roots can go down a bit, but are should come up pretty easy when cut out ( Bermuda is the opposite, hence why i can't get rid of what i'm cursed with, lol.. )

Bet when you dig for the pool you'll get into nicer, less compacted stuff that will be ideal for creating mounds / hills. Would love to have a couple bucket fulls of the red sand from up there.

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RJ
3 minutes ago, AZPalms said:

Local nursery grows them from seed here from their own trees. I can pick them up for about $50 for a 15g. They’re bulletproof here in AZ. Full sun, medium water, easy grow. I would say it’s a medium grower speed wise. Nice looking palm!

There is a debate on Blackburniana is actually a subspecies or a variation of S. bermudana or another Sabal. I think it’ll be a decent sized to large palm. The nursery that grows these has larger ones, not sure on age but it’s decently sized. 

Moderate grower for a Sabal? How about size wise? I like big sabals. I’ve got Bermudana ... still small though 

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AZPalms
7 minutes ago, RJ said:

Moderate grower for a Sabal? How about size wise? I like big sabals. I’ve got Bermudana ... still small though 

I would say it’s quick for a Sabal, at least in my eyes. Size wise is unknown. They claim 25-40ft height snd 15-20ft spread. I believe that from what I’ve seen of theirs.

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RyManUtah
4 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Oh, i hear ya.. Even back east where lawns fit the ideal landscape more, never understood why people wasted so much space for a lawn they never used.. Some of the homes we took care of when i lived in Ohio had 1/2-2 acre ..lawns.. I'd stand in a couple yards while cleaning out beds thinking about what a waste of space it was.. 

My casual guess would be some sort of Blue Grass or some type of Tall Fescue.. especially since neither go dormant in winter. Can't imagine they'd use Bermuda up there ( Count your blessings they don't, lol ) and yes, roots can go down a bit, but are should come up pretty easy when cut out ( Bermuda is the opposite, hence why i can't get rid of what i'm cursed with, lol.. )

Bet when you dig for the pool you'll get into nicer, less compacted stuff that will be ideal for creating mounds / hills. Would love to have a couple bucket fulls of the red sand from up there.

Right? So much wasted space. I may put out a small paver patio, which I will actually use, to enjoy my plants and sunlight. I don’t desire anymore than that in the way of open flat space. Especially with a wide open Mojave all around. To each their own I guess. I’d rather have some shade or fruit, myself. 
 

Fescue sounds familiar. I bet it is that. I will keep it alive until I’m done with it, but it doesn’t get any special care aside from cutting and watering. I loathe cutting the lawn. I’d rather climb up a palm & trim that haha. 
 

If the timing of the dig aligns with my coming your way to possibly get some plants, I can bring you some. 

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Silas_Sancona
1 hour ago, RyManUtah said:

Right? So much wasted space. I may put out a small paver patio, which I will actually use, to enjoy my plants and sunlight. I don’t desire anymore than that in the way of open flat space. Especially with a wide open Mojave all around. To each their own I guess. I’d rather have some shade or fruit, myself.
 

If the timing of the dig aligns with my coming your way to possibly get some plants, I can bring you some. 

It is.. I mean, can be worth having some.. if you actually use it.   For most though,  a lawn is just wasted space you could do much more with.. Especially in the front of a house.  When i took Landscape cert. courses awhile back, some of our class discussions revolved around how a front yard lawn space is one of the biggest wastes of design. I mean, when you think about it, how much time does anyone actually spend using that space.. Most people use/ entertain guests out back.  That's where a lawn can be an asset.

With the view you have, I'd add a patio also.

As far as creating mounds, dry or "seasonal" stream beds ( Seasonal = those that will direct runoff from the roof out into the yard in winter or summer ), etc. makes a yard look more attractive.. Yea, like you said.. some people like the square, open flat look but movement in a landscape is more natural. Plus, you can create micro habitats like seen in some of the pictures Jimmy shared in the Tricho. thread where the owner of that Cactus garden had smaller interesting cacti and other stuff growing on top of / tucked between cracks in a large slab / boulders. Facing the right direction, such a micro climate might even provide a nice spot to add something that might be more tender fully exposed during the winter or summer.

Appreciate the offer.. would take you up on it but with things here in transition, i may already have more than what will fit on the U-Haul when i move lol.. A trip up to Utah to do some exploring is one of the " asap after the move trips " goals.  Regardless, let me know when you're in the area, especially if you make a trip through this side of town.

 

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RyManUtah
1 hour ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Regardless, let me know when you're in the area, especially if you make a trip through this side of town.

Will do. Let me know if you make it up here as well. 

1 hour ago, Silas_Sancona said:far as creating mounds, dry or "seasonal" stream beds ( Seasonal = those that will direct runoff from the roof out into the yard in winter or summer ), etc. makes a yard look more attractive

that’s exactly what I want to go for. I do have a covered patio mom the house, but I want a small one out in the afternoon sun, especially for winter months. My gutters drained straight down against the house onto the patio.. i already rerouted them. When things fall more into place they will be the start of the stream beds, with a confluence of the two out in the yard. 
 

as far as micro climates, I thought of that as well. There’s a lot of cacti that are “marginal” here (Cereus repandus comes to mind).

they would do pretty well on the south side of a mountain / boulder I think. 

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RyManUtah

Not sure what happened there. I am terrible with touch screens :huh:

that should also say mount not mountain at the end.. 

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Chester B
11 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

It is.. I mean, can be worth having some.. if you actually use it.   For most though,  a lawn is just wasted space you could do much more with.. Especially in the front of a house.  When i took Landscape cert. courses awhile back, some of our class discussions revolved around how a front yard lawn space is one of the biggest wastes of design. I mean, when you think about it, how much time does anyone actually spend using that space.. Most people use/ entertain guests out back.  That's where a lawn can be an asset.

Fortunately here in Portland this idea is common practice, especially in the city.  A high percentage of homes have gardens only in the front.

 

11 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Plus, you can create micro habitats like seen in some of the pictures Jimmy shared in the Tricho. thread where the owner of that Cactus garden had smaller interesting cacti and other stuff growing on top of / tucked between cracks in a large slab / boulders.

Look up "crevice garden", along the same lines.

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Silas_Sancona
22 minutes ago, Chester B said:

Fortunately here in Portland this idea is common practice, especially in the city.  A high percentage of homes have gardens only in the front.

 

Look up "crevice garden", along the same lines.

The idea of utilizing yard space more for gardens over lawns in front is slowly catching on here in AZ, especially down in Tucson, as well.. Becoming common in California also..  While i kept the layout of the front here quite basic, lost count of how many people pass taking pictures or, in one case, had an older gentleman park on the street ( not exactly legal, lol and kind of dangerous ) and walk up the entryway to the house taking pictures. He also took other pics in other spots in the yard. When i went out to greet him, he shook my hand for creating something that benefits local wildlife, and is attractive to the eye.. Forgot to ask but very curious if perhaps he'd taught ecology or something similar locally. 

Only other yards on our block that aren't either scraped to bare dirt, or flat expanses of gravel are at either corner. Guy who maintains the yard down the street uses the space for numerous tropical fruit trees, and some palms.

As far as crevice gardens, an eventual goal i have is to create a wall out of Lava Rock and/or Aragocrete that will sit on a patio for various Lithophytic Ferns, Selaginella, Orchids, etc.

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Chester B

Generally speaking on the west side of Portland it's more heavily treed so many people have a tough time growing grass.  Even backyards can be grassless.

On the east side there are different reasons why people have no front lawn.  It can range from planting climate adapted trees, shrubs and plants that take no additional water in the summer, to providing food for insects and wildlife, to having very low maintenance, and many people do small urban scale farming.  Of course there is also the reason being that it just looks better!

You can pretty much pick any street on Google maps and do street view and you'll see many creative examples of this.  At my own house I have probably have about 40% grass coverage in my front yard, solely to hold our Halloween display.  If it were 100% up to me (Which it isn't) I'd get rid of the rest of it.  Many homes in my neighborhood have plantings only, and three homes so far have gone to artificial grass.

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Silas_Sancona
19 minutes ago, Chester B said:

Generally speaking on the west side of Portland it's more heavily treed so many people have a tough time growing grass.  Even backyards can be grassless.

On the east side there are different reasons why people have no front lawn.  It can range from planting climate adapted trees, shrubs and plants that take no additional water in the summer, to providing food for insects and wildlife, to having very low maintenance, and many people do small urban scale farming.  Of course there is also the reason being that it just looks better!

You can pretty much pick any street on Google maps and do street view and you'll see many creative examples of this.  At my own house I have probably have about 40% grass coverage in my front yard, solely to hold our Halloween display.  If it were 100% up to me (Which it isn't) I'd get rid of the rest of it.  Many homes in my neighborhood have plantings only, and three homes so far have gone to artificial grass.

Noticed that when i did some street view touring around areas near where you'd posted pictures of Trachycarpus.. Can't remember what the name was but there was a Park not far from one of the locations you captured that was impressively "forested" and had numerous large Horse Chestnuts ( Buckeye, Aesculus sp. )in one section that look like, size-wise, what you'd see out in the woods back east. Noticed some of the yards near by used their front yards for what looked like edible gardens.

On the fence regarding Artificial Grass.. Some i have seen looks decent.. but have seen the "Miniature Golf" kind of look too, minus a Wind Mill, or other animated hazards lol.. 



 

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RyManUtah

I put one in the ground. The ones that spread more rapidly, will have to wait a bit. 
mom so happy it’s planting time haha. 
E2CEAB3A-DDD9-428D-886D-142A82A2F1F3.thumb.jpeg.14e8903fa8ff5dbd31db7fc1e5b6c663.jpeg

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sipalms

@RyManUtah - interesting thread to follow. Could you give us an outline of your climate, landscape and palmy plans? I remember seeing some info on other threads but not on this one.

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RyManUtah
4 hours ago, sipalms said:

@RyManUtah - interesting thread to follow. Could you give us an outline of your climate, landscape and palmy plans? I remember seeing some info on other threads but not on this one.

Of course! I will snap more landscape photos later. 
As far as climate, it’s a high desert 8b (16 degrees). It’s warm and dry most of the year. Our record low was -11F, and our record high was 118F. However, it is somewhere between 22F-109F most of the time. Winter is short and mild, with a few really cold nights, usually into the mid teens for several hours. Most freezes happen between Christmas and Valentine’s Day. We get about 8” of annual rain, most of which is in winter and during the summer monsoon season. We average about 300 days of sunshine. 

Due to a change in living situation I recently bought a new house, that was mostly grass. There were already two 6’ tall Trachycarpus fortunei in the front yard, i plant to keep them as they are and work around them. 
 

Here is a good view of the property before I started anything. Again, I’ll get you better photos later, but it will give you a general idea. 
 

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Long term all of the grass will be removed, but I am going to start with the small smallest area in the front yard. The sprinklers will be converted to drip line manifolds, to utilized the already existing pipes. In the area I plan to have another Grouping or singular Trachycarpus, up by the house where it’s usually shaded. There will likely be a Washingtonia filifera next to it where it indents to get more sun in the winter. Then a cactus area in the middle, and front and center a Jubaea chilensis. This will be xeriscaped of course. 
 

the larger part of the front yard, I am currently undecided, but I do want to add a Chamaerops somewhere in there. Xeriscaped of course. 
 

the back yard will be quite a chore. I started by removing the bushes in the sides. I donated these (oleander) to a new development to be planted at the entrance. I put my Sabals in there place. On the left hand side, I reduced the planting rings to two, instead of three, because I want to install a greenhouse on the south side of that shed at some point, as the shed already has power. The very back of the yard is lower, and Already rocked. I’ve built several garden boxes out there for vegetables. I fire out and swing set will likely stay. Although, I may eventually convert the swing set to be a vine trellis for berries.

the larger open yard I am going to start in one side, as it’s two sprinkler zones. I am going to install a pool to the right I’m the photo, as it gets the most afternoon soon there. There will be xeriscaped around that as well, but several palms. There will be a grouping of filifera, eventually a Livistina nitida, and as you’ve seen I installed the brahea. There may be more here at some point, but I am keeping the open areas in between. 
the yard is sloped so I am going to utilize that in my xeriscaped, to install dry creek beds for drainage. The left side will eventually be tied into the right, but will be the last bit of grass removed. There will be a small paver patio here. I am going to put my twin robustas next to it, because they won’t really shade anything and will grow over it easily. They will not live forever in my climate, so when the day comes they will be carved into tikis to enjoy on the patio. 


I am also going to squeeze a nuke palm in this area, up by the house where the covered patio won’t get in it’s way. This will serve to shade the house a little bit, but he close and enjoyable. 


In the Rocky xeriscape of the backyard there will be cacti, agave, a couple yucca and an ocotillo, because I think they’re cool looking. 

should have room, I will also install a few small fruit trees, but of course my palms will take the priority to real estate. I will likely try a Meyer lemon and pineapple guava, as they can be kept relatively small by trimming. 

on the sides where I removed the bushes I currently have planted: Sabal palmetto (3), Sabal mexicana, Butia ‘strictor’, and Trachycarpus princeps (2).


On the driveway side of the shed, it collects water from the slope during rain. I am going to remove that square of concrete and palm some more trachycarpus to help with that. They will have water ran of course to help in between. I also have a Trachycarpus nova I plan to plant on the upper left of the driveway. To have one over there and be “palm lined”. I may have to remove some concrete for that as well, as there are utility boxes in the area that isn’t concrete. 

it will be a lot of work, but it’s work I enjoy. And I also don’t plant to move again. 

there are power lines over the rocky area in the very back, that’s why it’s a good spot for a vegetable garden. I may eventually put a chamaerops there as well. 

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Chester B
8 minutes ago, RyManUtah said:

And I also don’t plant to move again. 

I've heard that one before...

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sipalms

Looks great, sounds cool. Looking forward to progress updates and pics...

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RyManUtah

@sipalms Here’s some more general pictures as promised. 0066C283-9ABA-40DD-B524-F6F707EB5B6B.thumb.jpeg.edb779ca8419ca314408d746e7748179.jpegDisregard where I spilled fertilizer. 
 

00049B3B-3EA5-40CD-9A7C-1E74940197EE.thumb.jpeg.ae1a645ee70ea6e5c16fc9187610fbbe.jpeg

A5B7186F-3A52-421B-B439-C310FDC3249A.thumb.jpeg.0f2b6f7a3336aa15674e205e6b334f7a.jpeg

597EBED9-12B2-4989-9808-89518526A2F2.thumb.jpeg.138188e89c9a8b61ed11c5a822dab9e1.jpeg

disregard the blue water barrels. Spring is when I switch out the storage for fresher water, and I worked outside while they filled. 
 

CCBCA0BD-4990-4068-8AEE-9E673ED520D0.thumb.jpeg.022fb3ddc04ebc885e2c0197756c13ae.jpeg

7F2B81BA-19A0-402C-A766-8064B84814B5.thumb.jpeg.765617f78d7d484cbd865123257d6ec4.jpegSky started getting pretty while I was taking photos for you. 

8484A51B-C0BD-499E-9678-DCF3124276E8.thumb.jpeg.3fed92d28a750f0254bce63a54d98ee6.jpeg

8EA9027C-1863-457D-84F0-CEDA0D5EC553.thumb.jpeg.2c72d8f429790e19ca4c8713a7b6b586.jpeg

CF13CDA2-B4A8-4AC8-939D-66C6AD098FF3.thumb.jpeg.11a9bc23e1f696ca8b804e8d2bfe75d2.jpeg

Bonus picture of the sky.  

D3B2F72A-614C-4036-9CF3-B2BFA4F45356.jpeg

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RyManUtah

I also put out my robustas today. They’re only 6 months old, but were getting pot bound. 
 

660401B5-BE77-4B49-B38A-36F25FBEB015.thumb.jpeg.78193b49047e468b8f97bbaef6d38530.jpeg

C47E95FB-5DC6-44FC-941E-6811227BB6F7.thumb.jpeg.fef2c5148b6ba7a3347f0f4ffaedcfb2.jpeg

BDD3CDAA-977F-4CAE-A2CE-DC2CA67F7C60.thumb.jpeg.0929bc388084e01d4dc1453f618acd18.jpeg

This spot is in Sun until about 1645 this time of year. 

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sipalms

Nice... Looks amazing. Will look great in a few years. I can't even think about how hot it must get by that block wall though!

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RyManUtah
8 minutes ago, sipalms said:

Nice... Looks amazing. Will look great in a few years. I can't even think about how hot it must get by that block wall though!

It gets pretty toasty. I hope it helps the Sabals take off 

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RyManUtah

Well they’re both flowering now. Likely both male? I don’t see any other trachycarpus around that are flowering. Perhaps because I watered them regularly all winter? 

B25D3F93-FD2F-4E70-9AC4-33DFB57E87BE.thumb.jpeg.9bc7e977eb7f762af5beb41ee0f86bc2.jpegFirst one to flower is starting to open.

 

2AEBB6D5-A4FD-4B10-8911-9DB09FDCEAD2.thumb.jpeg.67f62f5cebb0ec8259b2e45edfdae318.jpegsecond tree flowering, this is the tree that isn’t staked. 

 

74B315D2-828B-49DD-B1DF-4D4D998B4838.thumb.jpeg.d1e914791a7fdf85832873a36b944d9a.jpegboth palms. Going to be fun to watch the progress on these. 

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Dartolution

Very nice @RyManUtah

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Chester B

You have to make sure you do a September update.  I really want to see how fast some of these grow for you in your climate.

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RyManUtah
1 hour ago, Chester B said:

You have to make sure you do a September update.  I really want to see how fast some of these grow for you in your climate.

Will do. I’m curious as well. It stays relatively hot until around Halloween. 

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10nCLR

I too would like to see how they progress. I'm on the west side of town and have a bunch of JM.net bought palms in pots still. Trying to decide what and where to plant in the back yard.  Question for you, did you buy that Brahea Armata at Home Depot this past early winter? If it was that last one, I was eyeing it for a few months, lol. They had 3 sitting there for over a year.. I bought 2 of them on a discount after mentioning they had them forever. 
Those Braheas Armatas over at In-N-Out and also over at the Chic-fil-A corner are doing really well, I hope mine in the front yard gets like those. 

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kinzyjr

@10nCLR Welcome to the forums!  Good to have another member from St. George!

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10nCLR

Well thank you. Glad to be here. Been a green thumber most of my life.

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RyManUtah

Welcome!! So nice to not be so isolated out here! Would love to hear what you’re growing locally as well! I have several in pots still getting ready to go out myself. 
@10nCLR

Yes, I did actually hahaha. I saw they had one and had to take it! I agree. The chickfila specimens are my favorite. They’re very silver and “stringy”. 

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RyManUtah

Update; they both are male. 7A58EF1D-C8F5-44E1-B835-A6B5AB1858B5.thumb.jpeg.8e9091f962ab2491b566b2ba060bd166.jpeg7B2EFA2F-4CC0-4960-AD02-81F8D852DB57.thumb.jpeg.2c206ba9f48eb605024db297d88a76d7.jpeg

 

206301C0-8AB8-4E4F-A95E-A5C2CBACAE2A.thumb.jpeg.8e14bfebe206b035c57fc45de63e9ca7.jpeg

 

8438CB72-07B3-4252-A6CF-24C0179FCE84.thumb.jpeg.6abe462f54a9346b5de0ce34c4f48b62.jpeg

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kinzyjr

Nice work, @RyManUtah!  Now you need more until you get a few females. ;)

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RyManUtah
24 minutes ago, kinzyjr said:

Nice work, @RyManUtah!  Now you need more until you get a few females. ;)

Thanks @kinzyjr ! There will be more for sure. If I’m lucky, one of my princeps will end up female. That could be fun to cross. 

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mdsonofthesouth
On 3/4/2020 at 9:33 PM, Silas_Sancona said:

Oh, i hear ya.. Even back east where lawns fit the ideal landscape more, never understood why people wasted so much space for a lawn they never used.. Some of the homes we took care of when i lived in Ohio had 1/2-2 acre ..lawns.. I'd stand in a couple yards while cleaning out beds thinking about what a waste of space it was.. 

My casual guess would be some sort of Blue Grass or some type of Tall Fescue.. especially since neither go dormant in winter. Can't imagine they'd use Bermuda up there ( Count your blessings they don't, lol ) and yes, roots can go down a bit, but are should come up pretty easy when cut out ( Bermuda is the opposite, hence why i can't get rid of what i'm cursed with, lol.. )

Bet when you dig for the pool you'll get into nicer, less compacted stuff that will be ideal for creating mounds / hills. Would love to have a couple bucket fulls of the red sand from up there.

 

I LOVE grass! Great for the kids to play in and if managed well can look amazing! Sadly mis a year like I did last year and it all goes downhill fast. Hopefully this year I'll pick back up, but nothing makes me happier than having green grass and evergreen plants year round while everyone else's has brown and spotty yards (native Bermuda grass dormancy). To each their own I guess.

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RJ
18 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

 

I LOVE grass! Great for the kids to play in and if managed well can look amazing! Sadly mis a year like I did last year and it all goes downhill fast. Hopefully this year I'll pick back up, but nothing makes me happier than having green grass and evergreen plants year round while everyone else's has brown and spotty yards (native Bermuda grass dormancy). To each their own I guess.

Cool season grasses get nuked down here no mater what you do in the summer. Just too hot, and the sun is too intense. I do overseed in the winter with annual rye grass that looks nice all winter into late spring. When I lived up north a well kept lawn is certainly nice  for the kids to play on. Down here not so much though.  Folks prefer the shade more. 

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mdsonofthesouth
12 hours ago, RJ said:

Cool season grasses get nuked down here no mater what you do in the summer. Just too hot, and the sun is too intense. I do overseed in the winter with annual rye grass that looks nice all winter into late spring. When I lived up north a well kept lawn is certainly nice  for the kids to play on. Down here not so much though.  Folks prefer the shade more. 

 

Cool season looks great in the winter here, summer it gets stressed but that's where the Bermuda grass comes in. We have the same summer heat here in the DMV swamp. Where we differ is winter lows where northern incursions are more "available". Typically I overseed late September early October and stop cutting sometime in late November sometimes later sometimes sooner. But by late October early November the grass slows down a hair. 

 

But yeah our main issue with grass is cool season looks rough in summer and warm season looks rough in winter. So there really isn't a grass that's "perfect" for us. The only thing you can do here is keep a good organic program and maintain and seed and most winters I can keep the Bermuda greener in the winter and the tttf looking OK in the summer. Sadly on well irrigation is a no go. Our other big issue is we get year round weeds that hinder both types of grass 12 months out of the year. The struggles of being a transition zone climate that has HOT and HUMID spring to early fall and mild but with temperate times in winter. 

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mdsonofthesouth

@RyManUtah keep it up! Love the landscaping ideas! I need to update mine and this is motivational :D

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RyManUtah

Another one gets grounded, Sphaeralcea ambigua. Not a palm, but cool nonetheless. You don’t see this color too often. It was pretty distressed, so I wanted to get it out before the heat comes next week. 
 

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RyManUtah
3 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

@RyManUtah keep it up! Love the landscaping ideas! I need to update mine and this is motivational :D

Thanks!! Will do. I want to do more, but life is a little crazy at the moment. I am just hitting it here and there as I can. 

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