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csentell1924

Feather Leafed palms in N. AL

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csentell1924

Any recommendations for the best Feather leafed palms that can grow in North Alabama 7b? I have read that Butia Capitata might not be the best option. I am looking for palms to grow with no winter protection, but a little will be fine if neccessary.

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Chester B

I think the Butia and a hybrid palm that is half Butia and half Jubaea chilensis would be the only two that might have a a chance.   Hopefully others in your area can provide some experience. 

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PalmatierMeg

I don't believe there is any pinnate/feathered palm that can survive in z7b without serious protection and supplemental heat. The mule palm may be the closest you can get and its long term prospects are limited. Your best bets are the mostly non-trunking palmate palms, i.e., Sabal minor, Rhapidophyllum, perhaps trunking Trachycarpus (doubtful). There are multiple cultivars of Sabal minor, from uber dwarf to giant. Pinnate palms may survive best/longest in movable pots.

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csentell1924

I'm surprised everyone is saying Trachycarpus wouldn't do good around here. As Mercedes-benz of Huntsville has 2, a hotel in Huntsville has one, and a Sonic in Scottsboro has one as well. Also, I believe a few houses in Hampton Cove (A fancy part of Huntsville) have some as well. But I guess these places could have created micro climates. Below I have pictures of 3 mentioned above.

Screenshot_20200118-120533_Earth.jpg

Screenshot_20200118-120423_Earth.jpg

Screenshot_20200118-120327_Earth.jpg

Edited by csentell1924
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oasis371

Trachycarpus palms are not pinnate/feather palm, and the OP was interested in pinnate palms, not palmate ones.

Having said that, I think Butia is probably the best bet as a pinnate palm. Not sure about Jubaea chilensis in the Southeast..., they did to prefer much drier Mediterranean climates.

Edited by oasis371

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Austinpalm

I think you could try Chamaedorea radicallis up against the house or some other building and on the south/southeast side. Maybe even C. microspadix.  Radicallis is definitely the hardier of the two IMO.  Plant them early this spring so they will have a whole growing season to get established.  They may need some protection on the coldest of nights. But neither gets real big, so should be doable.  Good luck!

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

Maybe try Allogopteria Arenaria for something different then a fan palm. Super slow growing so will always be able to cover. Mine saw 20° F with freezing rain with no protection and had zero leaf burn. 

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Austinpalm

An additional species you might try, again in somewhat of a protected situation on the south side and against a structure would be Phoenix acaulis.  This is not the easiest species to find, and while many supposedly P. acaulis floating around may seem to be hybrids, the short stature of P. acualis coupled with its general cold hardiness along with that of P. canariensis or dactylifera, (often involved in the hybridizing) infers great hardiness and like chamaedorea, smaller size to allow for protection when needed. My specimen here in Austin has survived mid-teens with little problem unprotected.

I do agree that Allogoptera is worth a try as well.  In my experience it burns back below 23F of so, but it always roars back the following summer and increases in size before the next winter.  I expect your summers are warm like mine and will kick it into grow mode once winter is over.

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