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James B

Crown shafted full sun palms for inland CA

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James B

Happy Friday all!

My question is for the veteran Socal members especially those a bit inland. I have some spots that will receive full sun most of the day 50 miles inland in Rancho Cucamonga. I’m want to stick with palms with crown shafts that will handle the intense sun here. I have 2 Roystonea planted already so at this time based on the size of my yard I’m not adding any. I have over 30 Archontophoenix in my yard so that would eliminate them as well. Many of you have been in the Palm game much longer than I have what are your thoughts?

Thank you for the input!

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Jeff985

Woodyetias are always a crowd pleaser. Not exactly rare though. 

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Vari805

Dypsis leptocheilos

dypsis tri-bear hyb 

dypsis Pembana 

Foxy lady

vietchia arecina 

Dypsis prestoniana

ptychosperma elegens 

hyophorbe

honestly there is a LOT you can grow in your area. Pm me  

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James B
17 minutes ago, Vari805 said:

Dypsis leptocheilos

dypsis tri-bear hyb 

dypsis Pembana 

Foxy lady

vietchia arecina 

Dypsis prestoniana

ptychosperma elegens 

hyophorbe

honestly there is a LOT you can grow in your area. Pm me  

Dypsis Pembana does ok in full inland sun? It is on my list for purchase this year. Beautiful palms. From what I’ve read here members have said inland it needs part sun or filtered light. I might be crazy enough to try it

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James B
1 hour ago, Jeff985 said:

Woodyetias are always a crowd pleaser. Not exactly rare though. 

I have one I planted last year in April/May that’s in full summer sun and doing solid. Not the fastest grower but is happy with only mild burn. I think this year it should do even better considering it has had time to get its roots going. If it continues to do well I might look into eventually adding a second.

Edited by James B
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Chris Chance
1 hour ago, James B said:

Dypsis Pembana does ok in full inland sun? It is on my list for purchase this year. Beautiful palms. From what I’ve read here members have said inland it needs part sun or filtered light. I might be crazy enough to try it

I think it would be best to plant pembana in a filtered light situation. I planted one recently next to a queen. The reason is to protect from hpt sun and frost.

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enigma99

How about a kentiopsis oliviformis?

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Hilo Jason
8 minutes ago, enigma99 said:

How about a kentiopsis oliviformis?

I agree with this 100%. One of my favorite Palms for So Cal. I had 8 or 9 in my Fallbrook garden and love the look of them. 

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Chris Chance
27 minutes ago, enigma99 said:

How about a kentiopsis oliviformis?

I second this! I have one doing well in Moreno Valley. I have a little canopy for it but handles my climate.

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James B
11 hours ago, enigma99 said:

How about a kentiopsis oliviformis?

Also on my list. Will it handle inland full sun though? Especially in winter months when the sun is farthest south and will be hitting it from an angle straight into the crown shaft. I have 2 Maximas that always get serious crown burn this time of year. I’ll take a pic to share what it can do to Archontophoenix. So for the spots in mind the palm would have to be pretty sun tolerant. Olivia penis is one I’m considered though. Picked up a 3 or 5 gallon Pyrifomis and it is in full morning and early mid day sun from 930am to about 130pm and it’s actually handling it well. Still in the pot will plant in March.

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James B

Thanks for the input guys!

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Jeff985
17 minutes ago, James B said:

Also on my list. Will it handle inland full sun though? Especially in winter months when the sun is farthest south and will be hitting it from an angle straight into the crown shaft. I have 2 Maximas that always get serious crown burn this time of year. I’ll take a pic to share what it can do to Archontophoenix. So for the spots in mind the palm would have to be pretty sun tolerant. Olivia penis is one I’m considered though. Picked up a 3 or 5 gallon Pyrifomis and it is in full morning and early mid day sun from 930am to about 130pm and it’s actually handling it well. Still in the pot will plant in March.

Olivia penis? Not finding anything on palmpedia about that one... 

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James B
2 hours ago, Jeff985 said:

Olivia penis? Not finding anything on palmpedia about that one... 

Lmao! Wow a new level of Apple spell check. I’ll edit for the sake of the children 

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Jeff985
12 minutes ago, James B said:

Lmao! Wow a new level of Apple spell check. I’ll edit for the sake of the children 

I understand the auto correct. I had a difficult time typing that on my phone because I was laughing so hard. 

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James B
1 minute ago, Jeff985 said:

I understand the auto correct. I had a difficult time typing that on my phone because I was laughing so hard. 

Haha!

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James B

Here’s an example of the intensity of the southern sun in winter months. These two Maxima are the first two palms facing south. They both shed new leaf bases and the nex exposed bases immediately become sun burnt especially the first palm. So much so the new crownshaft split open only a day after shedding the previous leaf. Same thing happened last year. Maxima and Alexandrae are pretty tough in full sun most of the year but they can get lit up in my area. My 2 Roystonea take the sun much better and thrive in it.

C1508196-8456-4345-B040-F7AD6DF24E3D.jpeg

BA179C13-4F2F-4F1C-8584-B6638F699371.jpeg

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DoomsDave
7 hours ago, James B said:

Here’s an example of the intensity of the southern sun in winter months. These two Maxima are the first two palms facing south. They both shed new leaf bases and the nex exposed bases immediately become sun burnt especially the first palm. So much so the new crownshaft split open only a day after shedding the previous leaf. Same thing happened last year. Maxima and Alexandrae are pretty tough in full sun most of the year but they can get lit up in my area. My 2 Roystonea take the sun much better and thrive in it.

C1508196-8456-4345-B040-F7AD6DF24E3D.jpeg

BA179C13-4F2F-4F1C-8584-B6638F699371.jpeg

Hmm, interesting, a new NEW wrinkle!

 

Thanks for sharing.

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DoomsDave

@James B, you certainly offer some interesting thoughts for experimentation.

I recall that someone up your way had a bitchen Chambeyronea that got nice red leaves; that was a few years ago.

I'd try for starters, with careful observation: (a) Dypsis lutescens; (b) D. baronii; (c) D. onilahensis, especially the "droopy" type; (d) D. lafamazanga; (e) D. decipiens; and (e) D. plumosa.

I'd also try Ptychosperma elegans. They're tough buggers, by heaven. I'd also try Rhopie baueri, especially cheesemanii.

K. oliviformis (whew!) might make it, too, as well as K. pyriformis. Other New Callians, I'd be wary of, but still try.

If anyone in your neck of the woods contradicts what I said from direct experience, follow their advice and tell me too.

There's a lot that will grow.

Go forth my son and experiment!

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James B

Thanks for your advice Dave! I have a Lafazanga I purchased from you that I was going to put under canopy but do you think it could handle more sun?

I also have a Pyriformis from you that is actually right in front of the two burnt Archontophoenix but since it’s only about 2 feet tall it gets shade from the block wall after about 130pm but is enjoying the direct morning and mid day sun.

I have a lutescens that is in mostly shade but will grow into sun once it gets above the house.

I do want to pick up Kentiopsis Oliviformis, Dypsis Pembana, and Rhopalostylis Baueri this spring.

I now have 4 Chambeyronias. 2 planted last October and 2 waiting to be planted in March in shady spots.

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DoomsDave
1 hour ago, James B said:

Thanks for your advice Dave! I have a Lafazanga I purchased from you that I was going to put under canopy but do you think it could handle more sun?

I also have a Pyriformis from you that is actually right in front of the two burnt Archontophoenix but since it’s only about 2 feet tall it gets shade from the block wall after about 130pm but is enjoying the direct morning and mid day sun.

I have a lutescens that is in mostly shade but will grow into sun once it gets above the house.

I do want to pick up Kentiopsis Oliviformis, Dypsis Pembana, and Rhopalostylis Baueri this spring.

I now have 4 Chambeyronias. 2 planted last October and 2 waiting to be planted in March in shady spots.

Keep us apprised!

I pu my lafamazanga right out in sun; on the other hand people have told me they get pretty colors in the shade.

I’ve got one in the sun I’m going to try one under canopy too come spring stepping lightly o’er the Lea. . . 

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James B
37 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

Keep us apprised!

I pu my lafamazanga right out in sun; on the other hand people have told me they get pretty colors in the shade.

I’ve got one in the sun I’m going to try one under canopy too come spring stepping lightly o’er the Lea. . . 

Dave how tall can I expect the Lafazamanga to get? As tall as Baronii? Shorter? 15 feet possibly?

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enigma99

My K.O is in full sun in the summer and it’s doing great. It’s not deep green due to the sun, but it looks fine. Gets to 100 degrees all the time. I think it’s worth a try

Edited by enigma99
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James B
1 hour ago, enigma99 said:

My K.O is in full sun in the summer and it’s doing great. It’s not deep green due to the sun, but it looks fine. Gets to 100 degrees all the time. I think it’s worth a try

Pics!

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enigma99
38 minutes ago, James B said:

Pics!

It does get full sun but I think it does get some late afternoon shade

9F686BB2-4536-41B9-8AC3-04816D4C1314.jpeg

Edited by enigma99
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Chris Chance
19 minutes ago, Darold Petty said:

I have no direct experience with this palm, but some Palmtalkers are growing it in hot and sunny Arizona.  A most beautiful palm !

http://www.palmpedia.net/wiki/Pseudophoenix_sargentii

Actually that's another that will grow but super slow.

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James B
1 hour ago, Chris Chance said:

Actually that's another that will grow but super slow.

I have looked at these in the past but would buy if I could find a large trunking specimen as from what I’ve read it grows painfully slow. I have over 30 Archontophoenix planted in my yard so I have warped expectations concerning palm growth. If I could do it again I’d have started with more slow growing palms to help manage expectations lol.

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The Gerg

The P. sargentii would be painfully slow here in CA.  I have had small ones but nothing to brag about. I have often thought about getting another one as large as I can find, stick in a part of the garden that isn’t a focal point and just keep it out of sight out of mind. If you watch it grow it would be a painful process.

I like the K.O. and D. leptocheilos suggestions. I can’t vouch how they would do in your area but sounds like others say they would do well. I have them in full sun in Ventura but that is very near the coast unlike you. The red on the teddy bears would give good contrast to your king palms.

I also like the D. decipiens suggestion but those are also very slow. I wonder if you can pull off a Hyophorbe verschaffeltii. 

If you go with a Rhopalostylis I think I would go sapida, not baueri. My experience was baueri wanted some sun protection while younger. (I killed it).

 

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Chris Chance
1 hour ago, James B said:

I have looked at these in the past but would buy if I could find a large trunking specimen as from what I’ve read it grows painfully slow. I have over 30 Archontophoenix planted in my yard so I have warped expectations concerning palm growth. If I could do it again I’d have started with more slow growing palms to help manage expectations lol.

Honestly I think it would be nearly impossible to find a Pseudophoenix for sale with trunk in southern California. Maybe in Florida and even then they're very expensive. My largest grows a leaf a year. 

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mlovecan
11 hours ago, The Gerg said:

like the K.O. and D. leptocheilos suggestions.

I agree with D. leptocheilos  also. As a matter of fact, they are one of the few species to go straight to my blazing sun and frequent 45+ C (>113 F) from a German greenhouse without any leaf burn. Took 8 or 9 years to trunk but fairly quick after that.

IMG_20191213_140528.jpg

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BrianRBruning@gmail.com

I have about 10 2 gallon Archontophoenix cunninghamianas that are from Inge Hoffmann's tree.  She collected seed from the southern most grove in Australia.  Her's came through the 1989 big freeze without a damaged leaf.  I will sell or trade.  

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BrianRBruning@gmail.com
Just now, BrianRBruning@gmail.com said:

I have about 10 2 gallon Archontophoenix cunninghamianas that are from Inge Hoffmann's tree.  She collected seed from the southern most grove in Australia.  Her's came through the 1989 big freeze without a damaged leaf.  I will sell or trade.  

Inge's temperature was 25F or less.  I can get more seeds to mail.  Her Aloe dichotoma froze to the ground and I gave her a piece of mine that came from a piece of hers to replace it.  It is hardy to about 25F/-4C.  

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Sr. Califas

Great topic and lots of good recommendations! I have tried most of these with pretty good success. Probably best to be discussed in person over a beer. But I'll just add one at this time and that is Dypsis lancelota. There are two at my parent's house about 2 miles south and 400 ft lower elevation from me that are both flowering and doing great. I have lost about three in pots during the winter over the years. So it seems that if you can get them in the ground with some shade to at least start they can work for us in the I.E. foothills. 

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DoomsDave
38 minutes ago, Sr. Califas said:

Great topic and lots of good recommendations! I have tried most of these with pretty good success. Probably best to be discussed in person over a beer. But I'll just add one at this time and that is Dypsis lancelota. There are two at my parent's house about 2 miles south and 400 ft lower elevation from me that are both flowering and doing great. I have lost about three in pots during the winter over the years. So it seems that if you can get them in the ground with some shade to at least start they can work for us in the I.E. foothills. 

Wow, I'm astounded at your parents' lancies. Could you send a picture of the plants and flowers/infructescenses? I say that because i've found them to be quite fragile and I'm only 20 miles from the ocean.

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DoomsDave
On 1/19/2020 at 9:33 AM, James B said:

Dave how tall can I expect the Lafazamanga to get? As tall as Baronii? Shorter? 15 feet possibly?

That's a good question. They appear related to baronii et al, so I suspect they'll get as tall as they do, however tall that is. to 30 feet+ eventually?

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Sr. Califas

Dave, these picture are from September 2018. All I have for now.  This is the bigger of the two. 

z5.jpg

z6.jpg

z.jpg

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DoomsDave
5 hours ago, Sr. Califas said:

Dave, these picture are from September 2018. All I have for now.  This is the bigger of the two. 

z5.jpg

z6.jpg

z.jpg

Wow, those are splendid!

Going by the trunk size, they look more like pembana than lanceloata, though the flowers do look like lancie blossoms. Lancie trunks are a lot thinner, at least in my experience.

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RichAZ
On 1/20/2020 at 8:20 PM, Chris Chance said:

Honestly I think it would be nearly impossible to find a Pseudophoenix for sale with trunk in southern California. Maybe in Florida and even then they're very expensive. My largest grows a leaf a year. 

George usually has them at cycads-n-palms.com.  He’s a great guy and not too far off in Fallbrook, CA.  I have one of his Pseudophoenix here in AZ and it’s growing well in full sun.  Much stronger than nearby Royals.  

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aztropic

I second the Pseudophoenix sargentii! Actually grow fairly quickly once a trunk base is formed.VERY slow until that point though.Here's 1 of mine.

 

aztropic

Mesa,Arizona

IMG_20200123_174103244.jpg

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