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GottmitAlex

Adonidia merrilii in a pot exposed throughout our San Diego winter.

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GottmitAlex

Hasn't been moved. It's an experiment. The palm is in a 15 gallon pot, south facing, no supplemental/artificial heat except the south facing wall behind it.

I've had it for two years now. This is its second winter:

 

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GottmitAlex

Btw, we're expecting cold rain tonight. 

Much colder than what we had 3 weeks ago. 

Let's see how it fares out.

 

 

 

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mnorell

That's impressive that you've been able to keep it going for a couple of years, Alex. This palm has a terrible reputation in coastal SoCal. I know it will handle chilly conditions for a while with no ill effect (I used to leave a big one out in our protected courtyard in Mississippi through about Thanksgiving and bring it in only when the first freeze was announced) but if I remember correctly Central Florida growers have repeatedly said that many failed after 2010's long, sustained subnormal winter temps in that area, and I remember that some people proclaimed it less hardy than a coconut. I believe it is documented as growing fairly well in the Coachella Valley, and I plan to try some at my house in Rancho Mirage. But I can tell you that one big problem with this palm is that, even here in the Florida Keys, it is a very slow grower compared with the other "Veitchia complex" palms. The problem being that without enough heat you may not be able to hold a decent crown on the palm if leaves start senescing prematurely or are hurt by the lengthened chill of the cloudy spring months at the California coast. I think once in the ground, without the aid of the sun hitting the root-zone via that nice hot black nursery container, your palm would probably appreciate those heat-lamps you have trained on the coconuts...but in any event it is fascinating to watch its progress. Good luck with it.

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Tyrone

Cold and wet does not suit this species at all. I’d try and keep it just on the moist side of dry through winter.

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