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Silas_Sancona

@Tracy @Hillizard @Fusca @Tom in Tucson @Josue Diaz

After a couple hints, and a year of waiting, flowers on a plant, seed of which was graciously shared w/ me last year by fellow PalmTalk member @greysrigging are finally taking stage during a time of year when most things are well into their winter rest, and i'm awaiting the start of wildflower season out front.   Have to say, flowers are well worth the wait.

Sturt's Desert Pea, Swainsona formosa, is perhaps one the most spectacular of the Australian native plants, let alone among the Genus Swainsona itself.  While most of the 85 or so species in the genus present flowers that look similar to most other Pea- Family things, S. formosa flowers are quite distinct. Because of this, it is one of Australia's most revered plants, so much so that it was adopted as the Floral emblem for the State of South Australia in 1961, and is a popular subject of Art, Photography, and has appeared in several releases of Postal Stamps depicting Australian Flora. It is also featured on the logo of Charles Sturt University there.

The plant itself grows in some of the hottest and driest portions of the country, behaving like many annual-type wildflowers that grow in gravely /sandy  desert areas in both California and Arizona. While it can grow somewhat vertically, specimens are most often encountered as grown hugging mats that spread out as they expand. After germinating, plants quickly produce a deep tap root to survive their environment. Flowers are most often produced during the Australian spring and summer, especially in response to rain. While the typical flower form is dark, bright scarlet, with a shiny, dark maroon or black colored "eye", ( technically called a "Boss", situated at the base of the upper ( Banner ) petal ) there are several natural color variations ranging from nearly pure white, w/ a pinkish boss, fiery orange w/ a slightly darker, or lighter boss.. and even a Purplish-red flowering form.. Only thing lacking is a scent. Seed can remain viable for years after dispersal.

While i'd started several seeds last spring, only this specimen continued growth as our traditional late-spring heat returned. Unlike what is suggested in habitat, the plant decided to focus on growth through the summer instead of growing rapidly and producing flowers in the same season here. Wasn't until the start of December buds started to form. Even while waiting for flowers, the plant itself has many interesting attributes.. Bluish-Green, fuzzy leaves.. Reddish stems, and leaf-like appendages that form at the leaf nodes along the stems..

Growing them seems pretty straight forward as long as a few rules are followed.. Because they produce a tap root, they are very sensitive to disturbance and don't transplant easily / if at all. They also detest copious watering, especially as they near flowering. Too much water, and they quickly rot.  With this in mind, mine is planted in a 3gal pot, in Sand/ Turface / Granite fines.. Absolutely NO organics.. and is watered only when foliage starts weeping and the soil is dry.  If i planted in the yard, seed would be spread onto a planting area containing rocky / sandy soil, far removed from anything that might need regular water.  It is listed as an ideal annual ground cover option in several local HOA plant lists around Phoenix, but have never seen it offerd for sale anywhere in town. It's 1-2 year lifespan can supposedly be extended by grafting seedling-age plant lets to Bladder Senna, Colutea arborescens.  No idea how you'd graft something that small, lol.

Anyway.. enough description.. onto some pics.. Buds to blooms first..

12-05-2019, first buds developing:
2133544202_swainsonaformosaflwprog.A312-05-19(3).jpg.98d3d006f8f031f58401185f160be3bc.jpg

A few shots of Subsequent progress:
1168932814_swainsonaformosaflwprog.A712-18-19(7).jpg.0199a1f871f4e395c0369a787190ca52.jpg678663963_swainsonaformosaflwprog.A1512-19-19(15).jpg.6efc4b40c46a44dd40dda2707040aaa1.jpg1268821472_swainsonaformosaflwprog.A1901-03-20(19).jpg.91af934b4a3ce38b85498d757cf4d3f8.jpg

01 08-12-2020, Flowers close to opening:
278325512_swainsonaformosaflwprog.A2401-08-20(24).jpg.662318806cf6e264d00e35f4fc8a3fb1.jpg1800496303_swainsonaformosaflwprog.A2901-12-20(29).thumb.jpg.13e9d88dc80888332c3bf9ca6ead4e98.jpg

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Silas_Sancona

..And, after a years long wait, the pay off..
1894683968_0113200917a173.jpg.3f110d154f3406311b09d1483373a5f2.jpg139356449_0113201945a174.jpg.07726d8707af88463d312e6ddaa66768.jpg404652452_0114200820a176.jpg.57ce9a163c2c84cb3e884551c10f75bf.jpg1236786123_0114201926343(2).jpg.267ab98c1b9deff4b89d1b3ad0953be3.jpg2126358138_0115201041a346.thumb.jpg.adb3ec5998466a22833bcb980acf9216.jpg342130455_0115201042347.thumb.jpg.00a262732b6d052db1dc3c2f7f1d5b12.jpg


Couple shots showing the entire structure of an individual flower.
2059606788_0114200943178.jpg.7a5f386d558ad4744f966ff14fcfe040.jpg821754707_0115201043348.jpg.b495afad9722fc94e4c733bd25965271.jpg

Will post a few more pics when more of the developing buds on the rest of the plant start opening.

Once again, Thank you Doug for the chance to grow this fantastic tribute to the land down under.. :greenthumb::greenthumb:

Enjoy,
Nathan

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Hillizard

Wonderful pictures of the buds-to-blooms development! You wrote: "It's 1-2 year lifespan can supposedly be extended by grafting seedling-age plant lets to Bladder Senna, Colutea arborescens.  No idea how you'd graft something that small, lol." I hope you do experiment with this grafting and let us know the results! :greenthumb:

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Silas_Sancona
8 minutes ago, Hillizard said:

Wonderful pictures of the buds-to-blooms development! You wrote: "It's 1-2 year lifespan can supposedly be extended by grafting seedling-age plant lets to Bladder Senna, Colutea arborescens.  No idea how you'd graft something that small, lol." I hope you do experiment with this grafting and let us know the results! :greenthumb:

Might try later if i can find the Bladder Senna for sure..  Have also read Parrot's Beak, Clianthus sp. can be used. Have seen those occasionally.  Using either as a root stock is said to extend the lifespan of S. formosa another year or two but yea, lol.. you have to graft when they're both seedlings, just developed past the Cotyledon stage, or is how doing so is described.  That should be a fun project :D..

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greysrigging

Nathan, great to see the success of the seeds ! As I have mentioned previously, the Phoenix climate ( indeed much of the lower elevations of the south west US ) is just about identical to its natural range. It can handle 115f temps and also 25f temps in a Central Australian winter. The harsher the conditions, the more barren and poor the soils, the better they grow ! In fact do way better in the wild than in cultivation. They thrive in iron ore tailings around Pilbara mines, where there can't possibly be an ounce of nutrition in the growing media. I've seen them flowering at all times of the year, generally in response to localised rain/flooding events. For example, Marble Bar in the extreme 'heat zone' of the Pilbara ( https://www.weatherzone.com.au/station.jsp?lt=site&lc=4106&list=ds ) has just recorded 8" or 9" rain in the last week with passing of a Tropical Cyclone..... this will really boost the local germination of the Pea, as well as the other desert favourite, the purple Mulla Mulla
10492169_916425738374196_5599984627117006549_n.jpg.810c541b04ff7354c27419ee5d4a46bc.jpg
5323_916425718374198_4446698187151687918_n.jpg.c002306b8477d6e4108217593fd928d0.jpg

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sandgroper

These really are beautiful flowers, in a previous life I was a safari tour guide in the north west of Western Australia and these flowers were always a hit with tourists. The ones growing around Nor West Cape, near Exmouth, produce flowers with a central white eye but my favourites are the ones with a glossy black eye, they are stunning. I should imagine a lot of our native wildflowers would do well in your climate as it is so close to their natural climate here in Oz. Great to see your efforts producing results, it's very rewarding when something goes right!

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Silas_Sancona
14 hours ago, sandgroper said:

 I should imagine a lot of our native wildflowers would do well in your climate as it is so close to their natural climate here in Oz. Great to see your efforts producing results, it's very rewarding when something goes right!

Definitely rewarding.. Had wanted to trial these for awhile.  Hoping to trial more species in the Genus later.

Between Arizona and California, you'd be surprised at the diversity of.. and lack of diversity in regards to Aussie natives in both nurseries and landscapes. In this regards, California takes the cake.. Not difficult to walk into a nursery that stocks very basic material and note at last 7 different  Australian native Genera in their inventory.. More specialty-type of place, that list goes up, quite a bit.

Here in Arizona.. at least from what i have seen, it is mainly some of the more popular Acacia ( 4 sp. ), Senna ( about 4 sp. ) and various forms of Eremophila that are encountered in nurseries. Some places still offer a few Eucalyptus ( Corymbia papuana being very popular.. Great tree too ) and the bottle-trunk forming Brachychiton sp. but many of the giant Eucs. are restricted to older neighborhoods / parks.. Very few options other than those.. Only Protaea- family member you see around town are some old ( and not so attractive looking ) Silk Oak. 

Desert Botanical used to have a section dedicated to Australian natives but demolished it when they built several new buildings/ expanded some of their Greenhouse space..

California on the other hand.. Name a Genus from Oz and it is very possible at least one species from it can be found in someones nursery or yard, somewhere in the state.. Have even heard that a few adventurous collectors have been trialing some of the " supposedly challenging to cultivate", rarer Orchids native to the continent. In time, i myself would like to try my hand at growing them as well.

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greysrigging
20 hours ago, sandgroper said:

These really are beautiful flowers, in a previous life I was a safari tour guide in the north west of Western Australia and these flowers were always a hit with tourists. The ones growing around Nor West Cape, near Exmouth, produce flowers with a central white eye but my favourites are the ones with a glossy black eye, they are stunning. I should imagine a lot of our native wildflowers would do well in your climate as it is so close to their natural climate here in Oz. Great to see your efforts producing results, it's very rewarding when something goes right!

I wonder how the WA Christmas Tree would do in climatically similar places in the south west US ? Of course the plant would have to find a host to parasite, but would be spectacular in flower !
82585068_1418458894995024_8365262722442461184_n.jpg.de35e6303a5a7eba86926f73c503b89b.jpg82888097_2500485050214938_3534835836400959488_n.jpg.ed8428b2320ba0bc8e323cecd6635411.jpg

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sandgroper
1 hour ago, greysrigging said:

I wonder how the WA Christmas Tree would do in climatically similar places in the south west US ? Of course the plant would have to find a host to parasite, but would be spectacular in flower !
82585068_1418458894995024_8365262722442461184_n.jpg.de35e6303a5a7eba86926f73c503b89b.jpg82888097_2500485050214938_3534835836400959488_n.jpg.ed8428b2320ba0bc8e323cecd6635411.jpg

They would probably do alright and they will survive without a host tree, they do just fine but they do benefit from having a host. A lot of cockies have left them in paddocks to provide shade for sheep with no other trees anywhere near them and they still grow well and flower each year. Would be odd to see them flowering in June, July and August though!

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Silas_Sancona

 

1 hour ago, greysrigging said:

I wonder how the WA Christmas Tree would do in climatically similar places in the south west US ? Of course the plant would have to find a host to parasite, but would be spectacular in flower !
82585068_1418458894995024_8365262722442461184_n.jpg.de35e6303a5a7eba86926f73c503b89b.jpg82888097_2500485050214938_3534835836400959488_n.jpg.ed8428b2320ba0bc8e323cecd6635411.jpg

 

40 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

They would probably do alright and they will survive without a host tree, they do just fine but they do benefit from having a host. A lot of cockies have left them in paddocks to provide shade for sheep with no other trees anywhere near them and they still grow well and flower each year. Would be odd to see them flowering in June, July and August though!

Doug, still have the seed you had sent last year and contemplating trying to germinate it this spring.. Part of me is considering waiting until later though. Concerned seedlings might not make it thru our summer heat in containers, and really want to plant alongside some sort of host.. Was thinking of using one of the many Grevillea available in CA. 

As @sandgroper had mentioned,  read that you don't necessarily need to start them w/ a host but if i get some going, want to give them the best opportunity possible since, to my knowledge, no ones had much success outside of habitat past the first couple years.. Would like to be among  the first to figure out the puzzle.. Or at least advance detailed insight into longer term success.  Such a weird plant deserves wider appreciation..

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greysrigging
4 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

 

 

Doug, still have the seed you had sent last year and contemplating trying to germinate it this spring.. Part of me is considering waiting until later though. Concerned seedlings might not make it thru our summer heat in containers, and really want to plant alongside some sort of host.. Was thinking of using one of the many Grevillea available in CA. 

As @sandgroper had mentioned,  read that you don't necessarily need to start them w/ a host but if i get some going, want to give them the best opportunity possible since, to my knowledge, no ones had much success outside of habitat past the first couple years.. Would like to be among  the first to figure out the puzzle.. Or at least advance detailed insight into longer term success.  Such a weird plant deserves wider appreciation..

Apparently they will even parasite grasses in paddocks....
 

"The parasitic relationship of Nuytsia floribunda on host species was poorly understood until an investigation by the botanist D. A. Herbert was presented to the Royal Society of Western Australia, contradicting the assumption that proximity to other tree species of banksia and jarrah, Eucalyptus marginata, was a requirement. Herbert discovered the extended network of filaments that embrace the roots of many other species, explaining the persistence of trees conserved in agricultural land cleared for introduced crops.[17]

There are various lists of both native[5] and introduced[3] host species that are vulnerable to attack, however evidence suggests Nuytsia is capable of parasitising an extraordinarily wide range of taxa with only a single published account of a species that appeared immune[5]. The generalised nature of the mode of host root attachment[4] presumably allows parasitism to occur on just about anything within reach.

Nuytsia floribunda was once common and well known on the coastal plain around Perth, often remaining in remnant bushland and gardens, becoming more scarce as the extent and density of urban development increased.[3]"

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sandgroper
5 hours ago, greysrigging said:

Apparently they will even parasite grasses in paddocks....
 

"The parasitic relationship of Nuytsia floribunda on host species was poorly understood until an investigation by the botanist D. A. Herbert was presented to the Royal Society of Western Australia, contradicting the assumption that proximity to other tree species of banksia and jarrah, Eucalyptus marginata, was a requirement. Herbert discovered the extended network of filaments that embrace the roots of many other species, explaining the persistence of trees conserved in agricultural land cleared for introduced crops.[17]

There are various lists of both native[5] and introduced[3] host species that are vulnerable to attack, however evidence suggests Nuytsia is capable of parasitising an extraordinarily wide range of taxa with only a single published account of a species that appeared immune[5]. The generalised nature of the mode of host root attachment[4] presumably allows parasitism to occur on just about anything within reach.

Nuytsia floribunda was once common and well known on the coastal plain around Perth, often remaining in remnant bushland and gardens, becoming more scarce as the extent and density of urban development increased.[3]"

Well, there ya go! Had no idea they would parasite onto grasses, incredible! They are very common around Jandakot, where I am and really are stunning when they flower. Unfortunately they are almost finished now so I can't  take any decent pics and really never thought to do so in November/ December when they're at their best because, I suppose, you just take them for granted. They're very easily overlooked for most of the year but they certainly look amazing in flower. I'll make up for it next November, I'll post up a heap of photos.

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Silas_Sancona
20 hours ago, greysrigging said:

Apparently they will even parasite grasses in paddocks....
 

"The parasitic relationship of Nuytsia floribunda on host species was poorly understood until an investigation by the botanist D. A. Herbert was presented to the Royal Society of Western Australia, contradicting the assumption that proximity to other tree species of banksia and jarrah, Eucalyptus marginata, was a requirement. Herbert discovered the extended network of filaments that embrace the roots of many other species, explaining the persistence of trees conserved in agricultural land cleared for introduced crops.[17]

There are various lists of both native[5] and introduced[3] host species that are vulnerable to attack, however evidence suggests Nuytsia is capable of parasitising an extraordinarily wide range of taxa with only a single published account of a species that appeared immune[5]. The generalised nature of the mode of host root attachment[4] presumably allows parasitism to occur on just about anything within reach.

Nuytsia floribunda was once common and well known on the coastal plain around Perth, often remaining in remnant bushland and gardens, becoming more scarce as the extent and density of urban development increased.[3]"

Thanks for the additional insight Doug:greenthumb: Will keep it in mind.. Perhaps a new use for my immortal, impossible to eradicate Berumda Grass?:D:lol: Doubt it would hurt to test the idea.

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greysrigging
2 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Thanks for the additional insight Doug:greenthumb: Will keep it in mind.. Perhaps a new use for my immortal, impossible to eradicate Berumda Grass?:D:lol: Doubt it would hurt to test the idea.

Give it a go.... but personally I think Phoenix might be too hot in the summer months. In the species natural range they would see temps approaching the Phoenix recordings, but certainly not the prolonged heat you guys get.
Would do OK in CA as the climate of south west Western Australia is very similar.....

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Silas_Sancona
26 minutes ago, greysrigging said:

Give it a go.... but personally I think Phoenix might be too hot in the summer months. In the species natural range they would see temps approaching the Phoenix recordings, but certainly not the prolonged heat you guys get.
Would do OK in CA as the climate of south west Western Australia is very similar.....

Agree w/ you on that.  Just thinking how funny it will be growing a couple pots full of sacrificial Bermuda.   ..Kind of a personal sweet revenge, lol

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Josue Diaz

wow fascinating! i didn't realize it behaved like that! grafting!? lol i have always wanted one of these but haven't tried one yet

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sandgroper
5 hours ago, greysrigging said:

Give it a go.... but personally I think Phoenix might be too hot in the summer months. In the species natural range they would see temps approaching the Phoenix recordings, but certainly not the prolonged heat you guys get.
Would do OK in CA as the climate of south west Western Australia is very similar.....

I don't know about the climate of Phoenix but they grow as far north as Kalbarri in the wild, there's a lot of them around Northampton too.

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greysrigging
9 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

I don't know about the climate of Phoenix but they grow as far north as Kalbarri in the wild, there's a lot of them around Northampton too.

Think Marble Bar and Birdsville, but colder winters.... 3 or 4 months above 41-42c with plenty of +45's.... and much drier... about 200mm a year.

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Silas_Sancona
11 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

I don't know about the climate of Phoenix but they grow as far north as Kalbarri in the wild, there's a lot of them around Northampton too.

Think HOT, lol.. They'd likely do great during our Spring, Fall and Winter but  daytime highs during our Summers are a constant 41-46C  ( occasionally approaching 50C ) with nights rarely below 27C, esp. June and July.. Relief, if it comes, arrives about mid July but it isn't until about the second week in September that 40+C heat starts backing off ..slowly.. Driest portion of the year is also May / mid- July when humidity can crater down to about 7%. each day. Sometimes lower.. Pretty rough on a lot of stuff. Many non native things stop growing, or slow down considerably at that time.
 

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sandgroper
2 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Think HOT, lol.. They'd likely do great during our Spring, Fall and Winter but  daytime highs during our Summers are a constant 41-46C  ( occasionally approaching 50C ) with nights rarely below 27C, esp. June and July.. Relief, if it comes, arrives about mid July but it isn't until about the second week in September that 40+C heat starts backing off ..slowly.. Driest portion of the year is also May / mid- July when humidity can crater down to about 7%. each day. Sometimes lower.. Pretty rough on a lot of stuff. Many non native things stop growing, or slow down considerably at that time.
 

Sounds like the Gascoyne and Pilbara regions of Western Australia, I'm very familiar with temps around 50c having spent 9 years there and I'm quite happy not to have that now, although I still love the north west. No Christmas trees up there, it's too far north and really warm all the time but there are a few other plants that produce beautiful flowers from these areas that may be worth trying for you. I'm at work just now but I'll post up some pics later.

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greysrigging
2 hours ago, sandgroper said:

Sounds like the Gascoyne and Pilbara regions of Western Australia, I'm very familiar with temps around 50c having spent 9 years there and I'm quite happy not to have that now, although I still love the north west. No Christmas trees up there, it's too far north and really warm all the time but there are a few other plants that produce beautiful flowers from these areas that may be worth trying for you. I'm at work just now but I'll post up some pics later.

I reckon purple Mulla Mulla would thrive in the Arizona deserts...
http://www.forrestresearch.org.au/portfolio-item/the-diversification-of-ptilotus-mulla-mulla/
We had a good rainy season summer and winter in 2014-2015 at Yandicoogina and the Mulla Mulla covered the landscape in flower all year round.... was spectacular !

 

Edited by greysrigging

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sandgroper

Found this pic of a birdflower online, they're nice little things.

Screenshot_20200120-174450_Gallery.jpg

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greysrigging
1 minute ago, sandgroper said:

That's one that I was thinking of too, also bird flowers I reckon would grow well.

No doubt would naturalise ( now whether that's a good or bad thing ? ), but in a controlled environment would be spectacular.
Here's some Pilbara flowers the SW US deserts would do ok with....10464333_916425691707534_7160742269666136914_n.jpg.7cf30345025c7b6961ed6fd177af5ff5.jpg10500394_916425321707571_3690608648433418498_n.jpg.34d031a838da28ecef7475810c141d65.jpg10535329_911733938843376_1204157221_o.jpg.06bf98a3c411f76ba2d681cf164bf438.jpg10683144_976572065692896_1732084197_o.jpg.201a4c9ccfbd94d3ecbcff3a6ab90b92.jpg
And the humble old 'Snappy Gum'
 

10505443_916426281707475_2744705743305885394_n.jpg

10614903_934403736576396_1532914250_o.jpg

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sandgroper

Also desert daisies and wreath flowers.

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greysrigging
2 minutes ago, sandgroper said:

Also desert daisies and wreath flowers.

For sure... are there seeds on the market for those ?

 

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sandgroper

I'm not certain but I'll have a look on the weekend, there's a native wildflower nursery not far from me, if they're available they'll have them. I can get bird flower seeds, in fact I think I've got a pod of them in the shed but I'm not sure how long they remain viable, they've been in the shed for a while!

Screenshot_20200120-175257_Chrome.jpg

Edited by sandgroper
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Silas_Sancona
On 1/20/2020 at 3:01 AM, sandgroper said:

I'm not certain but I'll have a look on the weekend, there's a native wildflower nursery not far from me, if they're available they'll have them. I can get bird flower seeds, in fact I think I've got a pod of them in the shed but I'm not sure how long they remain viable, they've been in the shed for a while!

Being a Legume, Bird Flower seed should retain viability for awhile as long as it is stored where cool and dry.. Even so, the hard, outer coat surrounding the embryo should withstand some abuse..

As far as Wreath Flower.. have been told these are real challenging from seed.. Still, would be great to see these reach the nursery trade in this part of the U.S.  Have only seen one species,  Lechenaultia biloba offered by a Nursery our of Ventura ( California ) that specializes in Australian natives. Hoping they'll attempt some of the others some day.. Beautiful and weird plants..

I myself want to try the Australian Cochlospermum ( Buttercup Tree ) species, and Cassia ( or Senna ) brewsteri.

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greysrigging
52 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Being a Legume, Bird Flower seed should retain viability for awhile as long as it is stored where cool and dry.. Even so, the hard, outer coat surrounding the embryo should withstand some abuse..

As far as Wreath Flower.. have been told these are real challenging from seed.. Still, would be great to see these reach the nursery trade in this part of the U.S.  Have only seen one species,  Lechenaultia biloba offered by a Nursery our of Ventura ( California ) that specializes in Australian natives. Hoping they'll attempt some of the others some day.. Beautiful and weird plants..

I myself want to try the Australian Cochlospermum ( Buttercup Tree ) species, and Cassia ( or Senna ) brewsteri.

The fraseri species of Cochlospermum is a very common Top End tree out in the bush.... I know it as bush Kapok. I think there is a similar one out in the western regions towards the WA border. They flower in the 'dry season' and are very distinctive with the yellow flowers appearing on the bare ( deciduous ) tree. At guess they are a very tropical tree ( ie not cold hardy ) and adapted to a wet/dry climatic regime. Sort of  a nondescript tree out bush unless in flower.
https://www.territorynativeplants.com.au/cochlospermum-fraseri-yellow-kapok
https://bie.ala.org.au/species/http://id.biodiversity.org.au/node/apni/2899125
800px-KapokCochlospermumfraseri3841865187_6bceccbf9c_o.jpg.b0ffaf72b97f980138434736fbf05f51.jpg
The Cassia brewsteri ( Leichardt Bean ) is a Queensland tree....nice flowers
https://www.australianplants.com/plants.aspx?id=1074
fairdinkumseeds.com/products-page/trees-shrubs-and-large-perennials/leichardt-bean-cassia-brewsteri-cigar-cassia-seeds/

s-l1600.jpg.b33a96b8e130ea2a8d3f36dbac2f928e.jpg



 

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Silas_Sancona
9 minutes ago, greysrigging said:

The fraseri species of Cochlospermum is a very common Top End tree out in the bush.... I know it as bush Kapok. I think there is a similar one out in the western regions towards the WA border. They flower in the 'dry season' and are very distinctive with the yellow flowers appearing on the bare ( deciduous ) tree. At guess they are a very tropical tree ( ie not cold hardy ) and adapted to a wet/dry climatic regime. Sort of  a nondescript tree out bush unless in flower.
https://www.territorynativeplants.com.au/cochlospermum-fraseri-yellow-kapok
https://bie.ala.org.au/species/http://id.biodiversity.org.au/node/apni/2899125
800px-KapokCochlospermumfraseri3841865187_6bceccbf9c_o.jpg.b0ffaf72b97f980138434736fbf05f51.jpg
The Cassia brewsteri ( Leichardt Bean ) is a Queensland tree....nice flowers
https://www.australianplants.com/plants.aspx?id=1074
fairdinkumseeds.com/products-page/trees-shrubs-and-large-perennials/leichardt-bean-cassia-brewsteri-cigar-cassia-seeds/

s-l1600.jpg.b33a96b8e130ea2a8d3f36dbac2f928e.jpg



 

:greenthumb: Thats them.. Think there's 3?  Cochlospermum sp. there.. C. fraseri,  gillivraei, and gregorii..

Both Cassia brewsteri and tomentella ( from Northeastern/ eastern Queensland ) are grown at a couple Botanical gardens around Los Angeles ( California )   Agree, beautiful trees.

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greysrigging
4 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

:greenthumb: Thats them.. Think there's 3?  Cochlospermum sp. there.. C. fraseri,  gillivraei, and gregorii..

Both Cassia brewsteri and tomentella ( from Northeastern/ eastern Queensland ) are grown at a couple Botanical gardens around Los Angeles ( California )   Agree, beautiful trees.

I honestly have not really noticed the differences in them... the gregorii is the one in the Gregory District of the NT, the gillivraei is an eastern NT and Queensland species.

 

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Silas_Sancona
3 minutes ago, greysrigging said:

I honestly have not really noticed the differences in them... the gregorii is the one in the Gregory District of the NT, the gillivraei is an eastern NT and Queensland species.

 

Good to know. Looks like gregorii was de-listed as it's own species, merged into gillivraei as a variant instead..  I'd just like to see how they fare in California or Arizona's  climate compared to one i've been growing, ( Cochlospermum vitifolium ) from a similar environment in Mexico. 

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greysrigging
4 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Good to know. Looks like gregorii was de-listed as it's own species, merged into gillivraei as a variant instead..  I'd just like to see how they fare in California or Arizona's  climate compared to one i've been growing, ( Cochlospermum vitifolium ) from a similar environment in Mexico. 

The Top End ones would not be cold hardy....might see the odd 5c minimums a few times a winter, but the days are still 27c-30c.... and definitely never cold wet feet which makes Mediterranean climes problematic....

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tropicbreeze

The Cochlospermum here are a bit difficult to differentiate without comparing them closely. Geography doesn't always help, both C. gregorii and C. gillivraei have the same general distribution from central Top End NT across north western and north eastern Queensland.

There's another one within that range but only in a very small area of central Arnhem Land, C. arafuricum.

The more widespread one is C. fraseri which occurs from north western Queensland across the Top End NT to the Kimberley WA (past Broome).

Good luck trying to sort them out where they all overlap. I have some C. fraseri growing naturally on my place (not an overlap area :D).

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Silas_Sancona
19 hours ago, tropicbreeze said:

The Cochlospermum here are a bit difficult to differentiate without comparing them closely. Geography doesn't always help, both C. gregorii and C. gillivraei have the same general distribution from central Top End NT across north western and north eastern Queensland.

There's another one within that range but only in a very small area of central Arnhem Land, C. arafuricum.

The more widespread one is C. fraseri which occurs from north western Queensland across the Top End NT to the Kimberley WA (past Broome).

Good luck trying to sort them out where they all overlap. I have some C. fraseri growing naturally on my place (not an overlap area :D).

Agree and thanks for the added insight,  Seems like, as Doug ( @greysrigging ) had mentioned, the two species grow in a similar manner as well. 

 

23 hours ago, greysrigging said:

The Top End ones would not be cold hardy....might see the odd 5c minimums a few times a winter, but the days are still 27c-30c.... and definitely never cold wet feet which makes Mediterranean climes problematic....

Interesting.. Locally very popular Ghost Gum, Corymbia papauna, and a few other Euc. sp. seen around town supposedly originate from parts of the Top End NT, and north eastern Queensland.  There's also a few Corymbia torelliana growing around Los Angeles and San Diego as well.. though the species is recommended more often for Central/ Southern Florida since it can tolerate humid / wet conditions better than most other Eucs from drier parts of Oz.      

 Sounds like these Cochlospermum sp. like similar conditions as Plumeria ( Frangipani ) which grow really well around many areas of San Diego. Regardless, many areas in the county away from the immediate coast where winter temps rarely drop below freezing, if at all  that stay warmer in winter compared to areas closer to the coast ( more sun ), but aren't as dry as it can be here, where the native soil is essentially Decomposed Granite and drains well.. Would probably keep specimens i started in large pots anyway, test specimens i started from seed or cuttings off those plants.  Anyway..

Couple more pictures of the Desert Pea now that more flowers are opening to start a new week..
1942051083_0124201205752.thumb.jpg.787fa0465b210b3cf25d4f17a1ddf995.jpg754388457_0126201549b787.thumb.jpg.dff2cd40ac8be7d8955ac6a25e963731.jpg

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sandgroper

Popped down to the plant nursery this morning but there was very little in the way of seeds, I think they'll be stocking up on new seed packets soon as they were almost depleted. I'll drop in again next weekend and see if there's anything new, if not I'll take a photo of what they have and  post it here, if anything takes your fancy let me know and I'll grab them and post them to you, they're only a few dollars each and might give you a bit of fun experimenting with them if they're not something available to you over there.

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sandgroper
On 1/27/2020 at 1:51 PM, Silas_Sancona said:

Agree and thanks for the added insight,  Seems like, as Doug ( @greysrigging ) had mentioned, the two species grow in a similar manner as well. 

 

Interesting.. Locally very popular Ghost Gum, Corymbia papauna, and a few other Euc. sp. seen around town supposedly originate from parts of the Top End NT, and north eastern Queensland.  There's also a few Corymbia torelliana growing around Los Angeles and San Diego as well.. though the species is recommended more often for Central/ Southern Florida since it can tolerate humid / wet conditions better than most other Eucs from drier parts of Oz.      

 Sounds like these Cochlospermum sp. like similar conditions as Plumeria ( Frangipani ) which grow really well around many areas of San Diego. Regardless, many areas in the county away from the immediate coast where winter temps rarely drop below freezing, if at all  that stay warmer in winter compared to areas closer to the coast ( more sun ), but aren't as dry as it can be here, where the native soil is essentially Decomposed Granite and drains well.. Would probably keep specimens i started in large pots anyway, test specimens i started from seed or cuttings off those plants.  Anyway..

Couple more pictures of the Desert Pea now that more flowers are opening to start a new week..
1942051083_0124201205752.thumb.jpg.787fa0465b210b3cf25d4f17a1ddf995.jpg754388457_0126201549b787.thumb.jpg.dff2cd40ac8be7d8955ac6a25e963731.jpg

Do you have these?

Screenshot_20200208-095712_Gallery.jpg

Send me a PM with your postal address and I'll stick them in an envelope for you mate.

Edited by sandgroper

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Silas_Sancona
3 hours ago, sandgroper said:

Do you have these?

Screenshot_20200208-095712_Gallery.jpg

Send me a PM with your postal address and I'll stick them in an envelope for you mate.

:greenthumb: Appreciate it!.. Will Pm you shortly..

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Silas_Sancona

Couple pics from this week.. As some of the older flowers starting to fade, seeing signs of fruit development when i inspect individual flowers.

From all i have read, they should be self- compatible but might need a little extra help in getting the pollen ( which is produced in large amounts ) to stick. In Australia, birds are apparently one of the main pollinators and are able to break a sort of seal that covers the Stigma ( Lady parts ) In cultivation outside of Oz, this can be done by running a finger over it, or using a fine-tipped Paintbrush to accomplish the same goal. Again, adequate pollen produced is funneled to the base of the Keel ( lower petal ) of the flower and will spill out as you pollinate.

While still early, Using long " Feeding Tong"-type forceps to carefully expose the Ovary, looks like some of the fruit are beginning to develop.  Fingers crossed.
1358869222_02082010321270.jpg.56da52f245d7ec88bc3bea13c2d3441a.jpg1039326703_02082010341271.jpg.b225c28ba08f1df51643e08616056571.jpg

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