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amh
2 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Agree.. both make sense, and i always explain both to clients.. Trust me, once i finally get my own thing going ( don't get me started, lol ) it will be the #1 " rule of law " that up-to date- binomial names are used, as much as possible, by all.. While not all are easy to pronounce.. most people are already quite familiar with things like  Oleander, Eucalyptus, Bougainvillea.. That's a step in the right direction towards building better confidence in getting your customers/clients more familiarized with more complex names.. Even if you don't always get the name perfect every time.

I usually miss a syllable the first time I publicly say the scientific name, but people are forgiving.

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Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, amh said:

Does anyone know the true cold hardiness for Hesperoyucca whipplei?

In CA. these things grow in places that regularly get wayy down into the teens each winter, -like 10F-16F range..  Imagine you shouldn't have any trouble with it where you're at.

FYI, if you weren't already aware, there are two forms.. the typical, which dies completely after flowering, and H. w. var. caespitosa, which will pup after flowering. Both look exactly the same to me.

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amh
Just now, Silas_Sancona said:

In CA. these things grow in places that regularly get wayy down into the teens each winter, -like 10F-16F range..  Imagine you shouldn't have any trouble with it where you're at.

FYI, if you weren't already aware, there are two forms.. the typical, which dies completely after flowering, and H. w. var. caespitosa, which will pup after flowering. Both look exactly the same to me.

I've seen them described as hardy to 10F, but had seen a few reports of them being only hardy to 9A. I didn't know that there were two forms. I've got a few seedlings, but I'm not aware of the type.

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Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, amh said:

I've seen them described as hardy to 10F, but had seen a few reports of them being only hardy to 9A. I didn't know that there were two forms. I've got a few seedlings, but I'm not aware of the type.

Once i'm back in CA..  i'll have access to seed/ smaller plants of both types. A really neat plant.

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amh
1 minute ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Once i'm back in CA..  i'll have access to seed/ smaller plants of both types. A really neat plant.

I had bought seed from tradewindsfruit, but I don't know who their supplier is.

Do you have any knowledge on Yucca lacandonica, the idea of a epiphytic yucca really interest me.

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Silas_Sancona
3 minutes ago, amh said:

I had bought seed from tradewindsfruit, but I don't know who their supplier is.

Do you have any knowledge on Yucca lacandonica, the idea of a epiphytic yucca really interest me.

I have bought from them in the past, but not Yucca seed..  You might contact some places out in CA. that sell seeds of natives,  though, looking at a couple places, looks like most places don't specify which variety they're offering as it seems everyone just sells both varieties as whipplei..  Inaturalist and Calflora don't even list the Caespitosa variety of the species, but Calflora lists a var. parishii.. which i can't remember hearing of.. weird.. :interesting:


Interesting, that is a new one to me.. An epiphytic Yucca would be cool for sure..

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amh
3 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Interesting, that is a new one to me.. An epiphytic Yucca would be cool for sure..

When I was in high school there was a native yucca growing on a live oak, but I think it might have been intentionally planted.

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RyManUtah

Is this a Yucca?
Looks more related to Dasylirion wheeleri to me, but it’s not(?): drastically skinnier trunk, deeper green foliage, much less stiff. 

 

147DEA12-DEEC-43A8-A403-0BF696B74A75.jpeg

4866408F-4195-4354-8F37-3A832451A662.jpeg

24A9A765-D18F-4964-886C-CB78633F5E87.jpeg

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Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, RyManUtah said:

Is this a Yucca?
Looks more related to Dasylirion wheeleri to me, but it’s not(?): drastically skinnier trunk, deeper green foliage, much less stiff. 

 

147DEA12-DEEC-43A8-A403-0BF696B74A75.jpeg

4866408F-4195-4354-8F37-3A832451A662.jpeg

24A9A765-D18F-4964-886C-CB78633F5E87.jpeg

That might actually be a Nolina..  possibly bigelovii

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RyManUtah
17 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

That might actually be a Nolina..  possibly bigelovii

Thanks @Silas_Sancona - browsing the genus, what I saw most closely resembles ‘matapensis’, though I won’t claim an ID not being sure ha. 
I’m wondering if it’s what is commonly sold around here at big box as ‘beargrass’.. :bummed:

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Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, RyManUtah said:

Thanks @Silas_Sancona - browsing the genus, what I saw most closely resembles ‘matapensis’, though I won’t claim an ID not being sure ha. 
I’m wondering if it’s what is commonly sold around here at big box as ‘beargrass’.. :bummed:

Yea, lol.. I was looking at the pictures over, ..and over, ..and over again  trying to narrow down which species fit best,  and i'm still not 100%, lol.   ..but, assuming the leaves had no teeth ( appeared to be tooth-less in the pics ) Nolina would fit, though the trunks still look a bit skinny..  ..that could be more due to how the plants are maintained more than anything else that comes to mind. 

Didn't think of N. matapensis, but that's def. another possibility..  Have heard that one is hard to get ahold of,  so if that's what these are, consider your find a really good one. 

..And yes, " Beargrass " is what most places sell Nolina as in a good %' age of generic nurseries.. ( have seen Dasylirion miss- labeled as Bear Grass as well in a few places also, grr, lol ) They should be more specific, imo.. but, we know how that goes w/ how various places choose to label things:indifferent:

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James760
On 1/2/2021 at 8:40 PM, amh said:

Does anyone know the true cold hardiness for Hesperoyucca whipplei?

I would imagine 5f-10f easily. Their native to my area,  zone 8b. 

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James760

Hesperia, CA  Yucca Brevifolia & sage bush?

20200114_165952.thumb.jpg.6580363b341d0a04cc48d6ff73a3b6fe.jpg

20200114_170009.thumb.jpg.f2d35fbc99de03fecab8f92f807acdc5.jpg

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Silas_Sancona
14 minutes ago, James760 said:

Hesperia, CA  Yucca Brevifolia & sage bush?

20200114_165952.thumb.jpg.6580363b341d0a04cc48d6ff73a3b6fe.jpg

20200114_170009.thumb.jpg.f2d35fbc99de03fecab8f92f807acdc5.jpg

First pic is Y. brevifolia and some pretty old CA. Juniper.

Second has both, and what does look like one of the Sagebrush ( Artemisia ) sp.. ( not sure which though, Sand, Calif., and Big ( Great Basin ) Sagebrush apparently all occur out there. Cali. Sagebrush has finer, long needle-like greenish foliage, and an almost lavender-like scent..  Big Sagebrush has wider leaves, ( kind of look like a Duck's foot ) tends to be more silvery blue, and smells more musky..  Sand Sagebrush resembles the more common CA. species.  Can see what looks like some sort of Buckwheat ( Eriogonium sp. = brownish- green " bushes ", closest to the road/trail ). Hard to tell for sure from this distance though, and could be Sagebrush also.

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James760

@Silas_Sancona, I like having you on palmtalk :D 

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Swolte

Great thread! I am growing around 20 different kinds of Yucca (I love these!) but my favorite is also among the most ordinary ones: the Yucca Recurvafolia! I got a few from the local Lowes one day and put them in the ground. Nothing could phase these: Full sun, deep freeze, shade, drought, and even complete neglect still have them look good. It was one of the first plants I planted when I moved to Texas. This plant basically got me excited about gardening and palms (like a gateway drug). It gave me confidence as a beginner gardener that I could keep things alive in the garden. Also, this plant, with its broad, weeping leaves, has a very tropical feel to it. Put a few in select spots and it'll start to feel like a jungle real soon!

Yucca.jpg

Edited by Swolte
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SailorBold

Just came across this thread.. don't know how I missed it!  Great topic...  yucca is prolly the most planted " exotic " locally.. 

My current favorites i want to add to my yard are pallida and aloifolia...   I like the pallida because it stays neat and has that awesome blue color. The aloifolia.. because its like a miniature form of faxonuana.  

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SailorBold
On 1/5/2021 at 11:29 PM, James760 said:

@Silas_Sancona, I like having you on palmtalk :D 

Agree!

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Cycadsavy

Three yucca rostrata’s of mine....

9F87B48B-477A-4B0E-BAA4-EDAC49E59696.thumb.jpeg.571d8086cef3f6dda289dbe151c0c93a.jpeg

These two were saved from bulk trash pickup as crazy as that sounds.  The roots were completely rotted out.  They’ve since grown about a foot a piece.

CE322DFD-B3F9-479A-A1C1-81CF9DB08ABC.thumb.jpeg.189b8c3e4ac03543e5dcb516f1b1ea87.jpeg

35309F6C-7AC0-4DCE-A821-D80F7864C011.thumb.jpeg.e706d1dd0890bdbb61d7419efd95849b.jpeg

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amh

great looking specimens, very good save.

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Swolte

A young cultivar of the recurvifolia

Bright star.jpg

Edited by Swolte
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