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    • SEVA
      By SEVA
      I'm not sure if this belongs in the weather/climate section, but I read this phenomenon occurs after extended periods without rain and little/no wind allowing the natural oils to develop on the surface of the water. I captured these photos recently at a local swamp.


    • NC_Palm_Enthusiast
      By NC_Palm_Enthusiast
      This afternoon while walking the Piedmont Trail (off Strawberry Road) in Greensboro, I stumbled upon a couple dozen or more sabal minors growing in a swampy area parallel to Lake Brandt. There were volunteers coming up everywhere, along with several older palms. My guess is somebody threw some seeds along the trail or planted a couple and they reproduced. Greensboro is around 80 miles west of the fall line, so pretty far away from the native range of dwarf palmettos. Here are some pictures I took:


      I also saw some of what I think are Southern Magnolias coming up. Here they are:

    • NC_Palm_Enthusiast
      By NC_Palm_Enthusiast
      I was exploring Southport, NC on google maps when I came across this large sabal palmetto growing among a few smaller ones beside the Southport Baptist Church.  It is certainly one of the larger specimens in the area.
       
       
       
       
       
       



    • PalmTreeDude
      By PalmTreeDude
      Just a little update on my Chamaerops humilis and a little tree frog that seems to like it. 

    • PalmTreeDude
      By PalmTreeDude
      The Sabal minor population in and around Congaree National Park, which is just Southeast of Columbia, South Carolina, look really cool. They have basically 360° fronds that stick kind of upright. Look at this observation of them that I saw on iNaturalist in their habitat. I would recommend looking around the observation map as well, you can literally see the different ecotypes around the Southeast. 
       https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/10726721
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