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NC_Palm_Enthusiast

Palms to try in zone 7a/7b?

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast

I live right on the 7a/7b line in the western piedmont of NC and I'm looking for some new palms to try. Currently, I have three Sabal Minor var. Louisianas and three potted majesty palms. The majesty palms have grown to be quite large and I'm worried I won't be able to fit them inside next winter. I'd like to replace them with some palms (other than Sabal Minor) that are hardy to my zone and can be planted directly into the ground.  I'm relatively new to palm cultivation so any tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

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Allen

Sabal Minor and Needle palm are the only 2 you won't have to protect for sure.

Other sabals maybe like Louisiana and Birmingham and Brazoria may do fine.

Palms that you may need to protect

Trachycarpus Fortunei

  

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PalmatierMeg

Rhapidophyllum hystrix is being reliably grown as far north as MD. Sabal palmetto, esp one sourced from NC, might also work. Sabal palmetto Mocksville is a variety that is reputed to be cold hardier than standard S.p. according to Plant Delights Nursery. I know you indicated no more S. minor but there are a number of varieties of that species in different sizes and colorations. Also check out Chamaerops humilis. As for pinnate palms, your choices are quite limited: perhaps Chamaedorea microspadix or radicalis. Butias may need protection at times.

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PalmTreeDude

Hello, I am near the boarder of zone 7a/7b in Virginia, just Southwest of Richmond by about 15 miles. Your climate is a bit warmer since you are farther south. The first thing I recommend is that you plant some Rhapidophyllum hystrix and Sabal minor as soon as you can (in the Spring) since they grow slowly, even in climates with long hot growing seasons. Both of these palms do fine here.  I would definitely try some hardier varieties of Sabal palmetto, such as Sabal palmetto 'Mocksville' like PalmatierMeg suggested. You would have to protect it at least a few times a year on the coldest nights, but it would be worth it. A Trachycarpus fortunei might actually survive most of your winters on its own, but I would still make sure you have a way to protect it. You can also grow some less hardy species and protect them through the winters. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
26 minutes ago, Allen said:

Sabal Minor and Needle palm are the only 2 you won't have to protect for sure.

Other sabals maybe like Louisiana and Birmingham and Brazoria may do fine.

Palms that you may need to protect

Trachycarpus Fortunei

  

Lots of people around me have trachycarpus palms, in fact my neighbor has a really old one that’s around 30 feet tall. Thinking about planting one but I’m not sure if I should go with fortunei or wagnerianus.

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
21 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Rhapidophyllum hystrix is being reliably grown as far north as MD. Sabal palmetto, esp one sourced from NC, might also work. Sabal palmetto Mocksville is a variety that is reputed to be cold hardier than standard S.p. according to Plant Delights Nursery. I know you indicated no more S. minor but there are a number of varieties of that species in different sizes and colorations. Also check out Chamaerops humilis. As for pinnate palms, your choices are quite limited: perhaps Chamaedorea microspadix or radicalis. Butias may need protection at times.

Thanks, I’ll have to look into those. Palmettos are no doubt my favorite palm so I’ll definitely try some a couple of the more cold hardy varieties. I’ve seen a few growing in nearby Greensboro so hopefully that means they’ll do ok this far from the coast.

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
9 minutes ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Hello, I am near the boarder of zone 7a/7b in Virginia, just Southwest of Richmond by about 15 miles. Your climate is a bit warmer since you are farther south. The first thing I recommend is that you plant some Rhapidophyllum hystrix and Sabal minor as soon as you can (in the Spring) since they grow slowly, even in climates with long hot growing seasons. Both of these palms do fine here.  I would definitely try some hardier varieties of Sabal palmetto, such as Sabal palmetto 'Mocksville' like PalmatierMeg suggested. You would have to protect it at least a few times a year on the coldest nights, but it would be worth it. A Trachycarpus fortunei might actually survive most of your winters on its own, but I would still make sure you have a way to protect it. You can also grow some less hardy species and protect them through the winters. 

Yes, I’ll have to try to some of the cold hardy varieties of palmetto. Like I told palmatierMeg, they’re my favorite palm species and I’ve seen some being grown in Greensboro which is not too far from me.

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Allen
8 minutes ago, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

Yes, I’ll have to try to some of the cold hardy varieties of palmetto. Like I told palmatierMeg, they’re my favorite palm species and I’ve seen some being grown in Greensboro which is not too far from me.

But you can't get a special variety like Mocksville except strap leaf and it will take years to get big as a bush.   A palmetto may die eventually but try it.

18 minutes ago, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

Lots of people around me have trachycarpus palms, in fact my neighbor has a really old one that’s around 30 feet tall. Thinking about planting one but I’m not sure if I should go with fortunei or wagnerianus.

Fortunei is so much faster for me.   Fortunei widely available in all sizes, Wagnerianus is usually only available up to 3' or so tall.  Faster and floppy fronds (Fortunei) or smaller/slower and stiff fronds (Waggy).

Edited by Allen
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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
1 hour ago, Allen said:

But you can't get a special variety like Mocksville except strap leaf and it will take years to get big as a bush.   A palmetto may die eventually but try it.

Fortunei is so much faster for me.   Fortunei widely available in all sizes, Wagnerianus is usually only available up to 3' or so tall.  Faster and floppy fronds (Fortunei) or smaller/slower and stiff fronds (Waggy).

Ok, in that case I'll probably try a fortunei. Thanks for your help!

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jfrye01@live.com

I'm in a high end zone 6b and Sabal minor, rhapidophyllum, Sabal louisiana and brazoriensis seem to be the best bet around here.  Sabal Birmingham is somewhat hard to find but is an incredibly hardy S. Palmetto cultivar if you want a trunking palm, but who doesn't? :)

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