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The 21st Annual Fall Extravaganza - Palms & Company

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Palmarum

Searle Brothers Nursery, Inc. & The Rainforest Collection®

presented...

The 21st Annual Fall Plant Extravaganza!

Oct. 4th, 5th, 6th, - 11th, 12th, 13th - 2019

 

The Fall Extravaganza set records and milestones in many ways. For the first time, we had a plant vendor in attendance. Legendary grower of Bromeliads and exotic plants, Tropiflora made the journey down from Sarasota to attend the Fall 'Ganza. Their display included unique Tillandsia's and other wonderful plants and it became a welcome attraction at the sale. In addition to a record level of attendance, we also had a near-record in the maximum number of Palm taxa, 355 by the time the sale opened on Friday morning. I had lost count of how many different size groups there were, but it was a lot. The remaining selection of tropical plants ran the gamut from numerous plant families to popular horticultural groups, including the extremely rare to the notably common and everything in between.

 

Friday, October 4th

- 7:19AM - The morning of the first Friday. There is nothing quite like the early hours of a plant sale. It's quiet yet hectic. Everyone else is out running around getting the sales area prepared and I am inside the main shadehouse getting the Palms and other plants ready. A card here, a weeding and trimming there and there always is that one palm that decided to fall over during the night making a mess on the sidewalk, (cleans up the soil) there. All ready. I began taking photos near the white tent to get warmed up. The intersection of both sidewalks has always been the hub of the Palm selection during the 'Ganza. This is where the gallons and smaller specimens are put on tables, thus where the majority of species reside during the sale. Typically, specimens presenting the 'rarer of the rare' are located here as well but they could be anywhere along the sidewalk or outside in the full sun section. The rounded corner had a mix of species including a large Pritchardia beccariana that was anchoring the spot, with its leaves arching all over. (B) The opposite corner held the familiar block of Red Sealing Wax Palms, Cyrtostachys renda.

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- Same spot showing the tables, but without the flash. They were primed and ready. For the most part, the species were randomly mixed except for the first table on the left and the (B) sole table on the right, facing away from the tent. Many of the rarest species were on this sole table, but not all. Mostly, it came down to what fit where. As every species had its own card, even a lone seedling in a 2-inch (5cm) pot takes up a chuck of table space.

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- Notable on the Forum and throughout the Palm world, Sabinaria magnifica was prominently represented by a robust, nearly overgrown 3 gal. specimen. It gladly took up its fair share of real estate among the rainforest tablecloths. This was the "instant gratification" size, for those who are not happy with a seedling or a small plant, not that we had any available. P.S. The exposure was thrown off by all the bright white cards, why the photos seem dim.

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- After running up and down the sidewalks securing the selection, I went outside to check on the Full Sun palm section. It was almost neatly divided into two parts, with Caribbean natives on one side and everything else on the other.

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Ryan

A link back to the corresponding For Sale topic: The 21st Annual Fall 'Ganza

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- 7:25AM - I headed back to the tent as I forgot something and when I got close I noticed the new red leaves on this 7 gal. Calyptrocalyx polyphyllus. It had at least four new red leaves, opening simultaneously. I didn't want to move it or pull it out of its group for a photo so I had to settle for this shot. It brought attention to its species for sure.

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- One of the new palms this fall was a coconut. A pair of 10 gal. Red Dwarf Spicata Coconut Palms, Cocos nucifera cv. 'Red Dwarf Spicata' were among the full sun palms, plus one of them held a surprise. Look closer... (B,C) The one in front had flowered and was featuring a very diminutive inflorescence. The tiny spicate inflorescence was forming some seriously small coconuts. They might develop into mature nuts, which are small to begin with on this cultivar, but I doubt it. I do not think the male flowers were open at the same time the female flowers were receptive, and no other coconuts were in bloom nearby. It looks cool though. It takes the phrase "Dwarf Coconut" to new levels. 

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- Tropiflora was still in the process of setting up when I came by. Their booth was located between the Bromeliad section and the landscape plant section. They had a lot of material for the size of their booth. In addition to the selection of unique and one-of-a-kind Tillandsias, they also had a mix of different Rhipsalis (hanging baskets) and peculiar crafted creations.

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- 7:29AM - I needed a good look through their booth, but I was short on time. (B) I stuck my head into one of their tents to find row after row of bromeliads and other plants. In the back, Brian was moving plants around and setting up.

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Ryan

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- 7:31AM - Moving towards the front, I made it next door to the Bromeliad section. Many of the different hybrids and cultivars were laid out in contrasting patterns and decorative fashion, thanks to Candy and her designer technique.

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- The corner, where the main road and side road meet, is always a focal point for displaying plant material. Rare flowering shrubs were most of the display, anchored in the back by a very large Carpoxylon macrospermum. (B) The side road was ready to welcome visitors looking for that unusual plant or just there to guide them to the shadehouse.

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- Squeezed in between the Bromeliad section and the block of Landscape Palms, the Heliconias & Gingers were ready in small and large groups. (B) Broward Orchid Supply was on hand to provide customers with orchid and gardening supplies.

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- 7:45AM - After their tires and wheels are checked, the carts are readied and lined up along the main road. (B) Minutes go by leading to the opening. Time to get all the small touches finished and ready for customers.

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Ryan

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- 7:48AM - This was a funny moment. About ten minutes before we opened, a customer found herself halfway down the road on her way to the sales area. She said "someone" spoke and said she could go in. She was intercepted by Jeff who gave her the option to wait there or go back to the gate, she opted to go back to the gate. (B) Naftali spreads a line of carts out along the main road in front of the Fruit Tree section.

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- 7:56AM - Time to open. As the little hand nears eight, the crowd gathers at the gate. (B) Emerging from a side road, Jeff flies around the corner on his way to the entrance. (C) Jeff barks orders from the golf cart as he and Andrea head out to greet the early arrivals.

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- Jeff and Andrea arrive at the nursery entrance and exchange pleasantries with the eager crowd. (B) A big cheesebox rolls by as Jeff looks over his shoulder and back at us for some reason.

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- And they're off. Jeff swings open the gates and barely gets back to the golf cart before it is swarmed by customers. He hits the 'gas' and pulls ahead of the throng of plant seekers until gaining ground and making it back to the sales area.

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Ryan

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- 7:58AM - It takes only a minute for the crowd to cover the walk down the main road to the sales area. It always seems longer in person, but the time stamps don't lie.

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- Shielding their eyes from the morning sun, the early crowd reaches the front area where they are greeted again by Andrea and the nearby volunteers. To get ahead of the advancing charge, Amber Searle crosses the road from left to right, just in time to avoid the rush.

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- At this point, customers reach the shaded area provided by the Royal Poinciana and have to decide if they grab a cart or not, and if so, which size.

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- The majority of customers usually have their destination in mind, but some go through a short checklist as they are walking, referring to what plant groups or species are their priority. (B) As they reach the orange fence denoting the holding area, they begin to split off into different directions. They have over ten plant-filled sections and destinations to choose from. Some might even stop to pick up a tree dolly or one of the larger aluminum carts.

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Ryan

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- 7:59AM - A large portion of the crowd headed down the side road. Some make stops along the way, but most are making their way to the shadehouse entrance in a hurry.

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- A 7 gal. Singapore Twist Cordyline gets thrown on a cart during the dash as (B) more stream down the side road.

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- At his station among the Tropical Flowering Trees, volunteer and Forum member Scott Cohen (Scott Cohen) helps another member Ana Bowers (annafl) with the selection. (B) The entrance to the shadehouse quickly became a parking lot as carts pile up along the sidewalk. Crotons on the left and Aroids and Exotics on the right become a target of many.

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- Making her way through the Crotons, FM. Nyssa (SunnyFl) (obscured by the pole), looks for her new favorite cultivars while her other half Larry follows behind with the cart.

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Ryan

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- 8:02AM - Craziness among the Crotons. On the left in red, volunteer Judy Glock assists those looking for a particular cultivar as others arrive in the section.

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- 8:04AM - Well, it didn't take long. After opening, the Sabinaria magnifica rode the table for maybe four minutes before ending up in a cart. It can happen and does happen this fast. It was quickly joined by a 3 gal. Iguanura wallichiana var. major and another member of the genus, a 1 gal. Iguanura speciosa.

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- A fan of the armed palms as I am, FM. Geri Prall (SW_FL_Palms) carries a 3 gal. Aiphanes horrida through the crowd near the tables. (B) She saw something else she wanted, so she passed the palm off to Brian of the Tropiflora crew, as he was heading in the direction of her cart. They have known each other for a long time as both have been part of the Bromeliad world for many years. In the flurry of activity, I surprised IPS President, volunteer and FM. Ray Hernandez (SubTropicRay) with the flash as he was heading past on the left.

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- 8:15AM - A palm collection gathers on one cart. I had the feeling more would be joining them shortly. From left to right, a 1 gal. Licuala terengganuensis, a taller 1 gallon, split-leaf form of Dypsis forficifolia, another 1 gal. Iguanura speciosa, a 3 gal. Licuala orbicularis and the base and stem of a 7 gal. Basselinia pancheri. (B) I had to take another shot showing the colorful and intricately patterned crownshaft, leaf bases and petioles of the B. pancheri. They have been known to flower at this size.

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Ryan

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- 8:21AM - FM. Tracy Sutherland (Tracy S) talks palms and plants with Jeff as volunteer and FM. Jim Glock (jglock1) describes the growth and care of the Red Sealing Wax Palms, Cyrtostachys renda, for a customer. The Dwarf Betel Nut Palms, Areca catechu cv. 'Dwarf', like the one on the left, had a prominent spot near the tent. (B) A quick shot down the sidewalk, as the morning was getting busy.

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- I followed the action down the sidewalk, passing cart and customer on my way outside. I wanted to see what was going on elsewhere in the sales area. The cart on the left had a few Crotons and a 1 gal. Satakentia liukiuensis while the one on the right had a 7 gal. Areca vestiaria var. 'Maroon Leaf' and a 3 gal. Coccothrinax. The Coccothrinax was either C. montana or C. saxicola. (B) A loaded cart full of Crotons and flowering Anthuriums waits for its trip to the holding area.

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- 8:34AM - Out in front of the holding area, Travis Searle and company start loading one of the first customers ready for checkout.

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- Turning around, the Bromeliad section starts to get its first visitors. Tropiflora's booth was open and ready, under the white tents in the distance. (B) As the shadehouse was getting packed, I headed back via the side road answering questions along the way.

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Ryan

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- 8:35AM - I came back to find the Croton section getting hit hard by collectors. It would probably need to be restocked if possible. (B,C) I tried to make my way to the intersection but it was slow going. I almost had to duck under the caution tape and take the scenic route. Flagging tape was beginning to appear as customers were going through and tagging stuff in a hurry.

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- Every step along the sidewalk had a cart with palms. A 3 gal. Arenga hookeriana shows off its silver undersides and goes for a ride with a 3 gal. Calyptrocalyx sp. 'Boalak'. (B) A 7 gal. Ptychosperma waitianum gets added to the cart seen earlier.

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- 8:46AM - Traffic near the tent as usual. (B) One customer was in a serious rush when grabbing palms near the intersection. They didn't have time to go back and get a cart, so they made an impromptu holding area under the white tent. It just kept getting bigger and bigger. The plants along the outside of the stash included: (left to right) a couple of 1 gal. Beccariophoenix madagascariensis, a 1 gal. Asterogyne martiana (center, front), a 3 gal. Licuala paludosa and a 7 gal. Heterospathe elata.

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- 8:50AM - The Sabinaria magnifica (obscured) seen earlier found more friends. All sorts of different plants are stuffed in there, along with a 3 gal. Hydriastele affinis and a 1 gal. Calyptrocalyx pachystachys (right corner). (B) Customers continue to arrive throughout the morning. The crowd at the gate was just the beginning. On the right, FM. Randy Wiesner (palmislandRandy) chats with another palm collector among many exploring the sale.

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Ryan

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- 8:56AM - Inquiries, questions and the constant demand to help find stuff in the selection brought me outside of the shadehouse. Traffic was building along the main road as I answered questions. I saw the crowd flowing towards Tropiflora's booth so I knew I had to check it out. Uh Oh, I see a sign in need of rescue...

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- The Full Sun Palm section had a giant target over it, as it is often a first stop for collectors. The Caribbean Palms and their brethren are always popular, as they are so easy to collect and as being near-natives, are generally easy to grow in S. Florida. A cart parked out front was receiving one palm after another, including a 1 gal. Copernicia yarey, a 3 gal. Zombi Palm, Zombia antillarum, and a robust and ready-to-plant 25 gal. Copernicia rigida. (B) The heavy C. rigida was really testing those small cart tires.

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- 9:02AM - The heightened foot traffic in and around Tropiflora's booth was to be expected, as their popular appearances at plant sales around the state, not to mention their nursery open house festivals, draw a lot of people. (B) They always have peculiar crafted items that are unique to their nursery including these "Jellyfish" ornaments; upside-down planted Tillandsias growing in recycled sea urchin shells.

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- Under one tent, Scott and Brian were busy writing up orders and packing plants for customers. Attendees that knew Tropiflora were happy they had a display at the 'Ganza as their plant selection is world famous.

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Ryan

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gilles06

It look like paradise :yay:

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- 9:07AM - "Big Palm coming through and it has spines so look out!" People made way for a large cart carrying two palms, one of which was a 15 gal. Phoenicophorium borsigianum that was truly out of this world. It had a huge, broad crown of undivided leaves and neon-orange petioles and rachises. It was large enough to start sporting whitish leaf bases which are armed with a heavy array of spines. (B) This is the 3D view of one leaf. Be careful, it's going to bonk you on the nose.

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- The second plant was a 7 gal. Hydriastele beguinii var. 'Obi Island Form', another palm that has come into its own. We had the variety in four sizes and in various quantities and it was simply not enough, the entire group sold out sans one plant. The showy duo featuring undivided leaves were being escorted out by volunteer, plantsman and FM. Tim O'Donnel (kwtimo). (B) He got both plants past the shadehouse door and towards the main road...

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- ... where he made the turn and headed towards the front area. He had to maneuver them through traffic. (B) I turned around and found a fourth palm in that cart of Caribbean notables; a 7 gal. Silver Bailey Palm, Copernicia baileyana var. 'Silver', had joined the party.

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- 9:12AM - A 7 gal. Blue Latan Palm, Latania loddigesii, and a 3 gal. Bismarck Palm, Bismarckia nobilis, were riding along with some strange and bizarre new friends. They are called Mangaves, × Mangave, intergeneric hybrids between the succulent genera Manfreda and Agave. There are dozens of named hybrids and they are all weird and different. We have recently started to grow them and they have been easy. While doing research on them, I noticed there is talk that Manfreda might be lumped in with Agave, I wonder how this will effect the name, Mangave. BTW, if the leaves of the Bismarck Palm look showier than normal, its because they were damp with dew and lit by the flash. (B) Up front at the checkout area, Mandy Searle writes up a receipt for a customer. The customer has a mix of plants, including a stop at Tropiflora.

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Ryan

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46 minutes ago, gilles06 said:

It look like paradise :yay:

Merci. A plant paradise is what we strive to create.

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- 9:13AM - "Let's figure this out." One trailer load of plants may contain multiple orders belonging to different customers. They are often brought through the checkout together to save time, but afterwards may require time to straighten them out when they are going on to different vehicles; which is taking place here, handled by Amber and Jeff. (B) Broward Orchid Supply is up and running. They have a ton of supplies, tools and materials as one walk through is not enough to see it all.

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- It all goes through the checkout eventually. Mandy writes up the grouping of Caribbean Palms seen a few times before. The customer on the right has the hook of her new Vanda orchid pulled up and over her shoulder.

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- Now that is a mix of plants. If it was all one order, bravo. It had a bit of everything, including ready-to-eat fruit care of the Violette De Bordeaux Fig, stretching out as the tallest plant of the bunch. That tilted Manzano Banana card in the background still bothers me, even knowing I fixed it a month ago.

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- Looking down the main road, customer traffic seemed to be mixed between the landscape plants and Tropiflora's booth. In the center left, Carson Searle, along with Kylie Searle were guiding a customer around the sales area. (B) I am glad it all fit on the cart. A large mix of landscape plants, flowering shrubs, aroids, gingers and probably a dozen other items max out a large aluminum cart. It was either heading for the checkout or the holding area.

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palmfriend

Ryan,

I LOVE these reports!

Great documentation about the event while still showing all your great plants and palms.

Please keep it coming!

best regards from Okinawa -

Lars

 

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Palmarum

- 9:17AM - I went in search of Jeff as I had a customer's urgent question to ask him and he wasn't answering his phone. I found him by the Croton section, on his phone of course. This happens constantly throughout the 'Ganza. As I was waiting, I noticed a full cart sitting adjacent to a duo of large-leaved Tabernaemontana crassa. (B) On the opposite side of the entrance, a cart held a selected 7 gal. specimen of Dieffenbachia 'Mary Alice', an aroid unique to Searle plant history.

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- 9:25AM - A regular customer brought her very friendly and chatty Sun Conure, Aratinga solstitialis, with her to explore the sales area. (B) Those deeply divided, silver decorated fan leaves of an Itaya amicorum are quite irresistible. The customer paused for a second to check out the group of Areca vestiaria located on the right. 

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- 9:57AM - Ray and Tim help a customer with a tall, 25 gal. Dypsis carlsmithii. They were leaning it back to get it through the side shadehouse door. (B) Free of overhead obstructions, Ray and the customer push the palm towards the front area.

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- 10:08AM - Just one more palm, a 15 gal. Ptychosperma schefferi. There, that ought to do it. It better, as there was no more room left on the trailer. Too many plants to name them all. (B) The Dieffenbachia 'Mary Alice' seen earlier had found its way onto a trailer, on route through the checkout. A 10 gal. Verschaffeltia splendida, complete with undivided leaves and stilt-roots, had joined the same group.

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Palmarum

- 10:09AM - "Yeah, I think it'll all fit in the car."

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- One order after another form a steady line at the checkout. (B) An order spanning a couple carts waits for a returning empty trailer to aid in transportation. Much simpler and easier than trying to push two carts at the same time.

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- Naftali keeps the oncoming mass of customers and their plants managed into separate lines while keeping track of which orders have been written up. Amber begins the process of writing up that one large order seen above, while further in the background, Travis brings up another palm-rich stash on a trailer. (B) With two registers running non-stop, the checkout process has been refined to be a quick as possible to reduce wait times.

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- 10:13AM - A meeting of the Palm minds. A spontaneous group chat took place near the holding area. It included Jeff and Ray on the left; Jim Glock in the middle; author, Former IPS President, IPS Director and FM. Paul Craft (Licuala) in the green and long-time collector, grower and plant explorer Bob Beatty on the right. I was passing through and didn't know what they were talking about, but it must have (or could have) been interesting.

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- 10:20AM - Cutting through the holding area once again, I found volunteer Mark in the process of maintaining the area. He was keeping everything organized, keeping stashes separate and labeled. Larger, heavier material was placed closer to the loading spot near the road, new stashes were started as they arrived, etc. Certain stashes spent all day in the holding area, whereas others were here for only minutes.

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- A full and heavy cart gets an assist in moving it to the checkout area. One last minute add-on, an Aechmea bromeliad, gets hand-carried. (B) The sales area was getting real busy. The early-birds at the gate were mixing with the late-morning arrivals and those who skipped out on work (or school). The attendance then began to blend with the midday sale goers.

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- 11:18AM - Another palm heavy collection had found its way to the checkout. This one was filled with all sorts of familiar, famous, rare and unusual species. The first palm I noticed was the largest of the group, a 15 gal. Cyphosperma naboutinense. It was sitting at the rear of the trailer, showing off its upright canopy, thick leaf bases and the lack of a complete crownshaft. It was also flowering with two almost three, thin, wispy inflorescences. The fan palm with the silver undersides immediately behind it and obscured was a 7 gal. Cryosophila williamsii.

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- What a selection. The group covers popular collectors' genera and many notable palm species. I had to look through as fast as I could. From left to right across the near edge of the trailer, the three-gallon, lightly clustering palm on the corner is the Apple cultivar of Red Sealing Wax Palm, Cyrtostachys renda cv. 'Apple'. The palm immediately to the right is a 3 gal. Calyptrocalyx sp. 'Boalak'. Skipping one for the moment, the larger palm in center-right is a 7 gal. Burretiokentia vieillardii.

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- 11:19AM - Immediately recognizable from any distance, Copernicia cowellii shines above the others in the group, with its super compact habit, ultra-stiff leaves and those intense silver leaf undersides that glow. This specimen is old... very, very old. Between 15 and 20 years is a conservative estimate. It loves growing in pure alkaline rock and gravel. The break in the pot just adds to the drainage as he could care less about losing dirt, if there was any.

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- Stepping forward and looking inside the group, there were a number of different smaller palms and plants. In the center of the frame with the undivided leaves is a 3 gal. Johannesteijsmannia perakensis and in behind him is a 2 gal. Dracaena cantleyi with the strange spotted leaves. Immediately to the right of the D. cantleyi with the pink flagging tape is a 7 gal. Licuala distans and a 3 gal. Mealybug Palm, Dypsis mananjarensis resides further to the left. (B) The Mealybug Palm was showing some nice raised scales, the namesake fake mealybugs.

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- Two larger seven gallon palms bookend the front of the trailer. On the left is a Cyphophoenix alba, the former Veillonia, and a Nephrosperma vanhoutteanum sits on the right. (B) This was a great way to start or continue a palm collection. The golf cart and trailer were on standby as I think the customer was still shopping.

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- If you are not sure one will be enough, get all of them. A customer rolls past with a cart loaded with a 15 gal. single and two 7 gal. multiple, Chambeyronia macrocarpa specimens. There are a lot of potential new red leaves in that group.

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Palmarum

- 11:24AM - It wasn't even noon yet on the first day and we were restocking en masse. A train of loaded trailers pulls through the crowd and stops along the side road to unload plants. Jeremy and Amadeo begin by unloading a group of Xanadu Philodendrons. The 'Lemon Kiss' Ground Orchids and Red Sister Cordylines were headed to different spots. Notice Scott in the background, doing his 'supervising'.

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- Customers peruse the selection of botanical oddities in the back of Tropiflora's booth. Those plants in the square vented pots in the middle of the frame were a type of Ant Plant. I noticed in the corner of my eye, large palms being moved about. (B) By the side entrance to the shadehouse, an order of large palms were being loaded onto a trailer. Furthest to the right and first to be loaded was a 15 gal. Chambeyronia macrocarpa var. hookeri. Next on the left was a 15 gal. Heterospathe brevicaulis. It is mature and already a full-sized individual as an acaulescent palm. Next was a 7 gal. Hydriastele kasesa being loaded by Tim.

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- Usually its a long process to restock a palm situated along the sidewalk in the middle of the day, but the 15 gal. Phoenicophorium borsigianum looked so good we had to pull another. And it sold. For the second time today, Tim (with help from Travis) was transporting one of these incredible palms out for a customer. With a good lift and carry, they loaded it onto the trailer.

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- 11:32AM - The trailer had left and made its way to the checkout when the customer remembered another palm they had wanted. Tim ran back with the tree dolly and snagged a 25 gal. Metroxylon vitiense from near the tables. (B) Full speed ahead. With a quick turn around, Tim was headed back to the front area with the last-second purchase.

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palmsOrl

Wow. Now I can't wait for spring!

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Palmarum

- 11:34AM - The Metroxylon vitiense arrived at the trailer and was quickly loaded, only to find out the customer was still shopping. The golf cart and trailer formed its own lane at the checkout while other traffic passed by on the right or walked around on the left. Travis and Jeff keep things organized as Amber writes up a receipt and answers questions for a customer about a Mango cultivar. (B) An instant landscape and collection, all in one. A big Spindle Palm, Hyophorbe verschaffeltii, rides along with a vast collection of plant material. The mix spans the plant kingdom. The yellow petioles on the front-left belong to an Alocasia 'Lutea'. A 3 gal. Jade Vine, Strongylodon macrobotrys, sits at the far right. In the front-right, two one-gallon plants; Dypsis marojejyi and a Calyptrocalyx laxiflorus, are part of the Palm delegation.

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- With Jeff reading and clipping the tags, and Amber writing and adding, the deluxe order seen earlier is processed.

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- The 'waiting' order sits as an Palm island in the middle of the checkout. On closer inspection, the Chambeyronia macrocarpa var. hookeri seen earlier had a hint of watermelon coloration in the crownshaft. The group waited for its future owner to return, probably with more plants.

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- They were almost done processing the deluxe order. One of the last tags to be clipped and counted belonged to the 7 gal. Nephrosperma vanhoutteanum. (B) Carson decided to re-arrange the empty carts by the soil pad.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 11:38AM - Theory became fact, as more plants arrived and joined the group waiting on the trailer. They just had to get a few more. At the rear of the trailer, three more palms were added; (from foreground to background) a 7 gal. Licuala fordiana, a 1 gal. Pelagodoxa henryana, and a 15 gal. Ravenea dransfieldii.

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- The deluxe order gets looked over by other customers entering and leaving the sales area. It was almost ready to head on out to the parking area.

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- With Travis at the wheel, the 'waiting' order was no longer waiting. It was ready to go. It slowly made its way through and (B) past the checkout as a lot of great palms were on their way to a new home.

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- The portable shop belonging to Broward Orchid Supply was all set up. They were selling a bit of everything all morning. In addition to the items on the outside, the inside was set up so customers could just walk through and select materials, fertilizers, chemicals, pots, potting mixes, etc. from the shelves. (B) Jeff chats with a customer as the busy morning became a busy midday.

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- 12:07PM - At the back of the main shadehouse, a trio of Dwarf Betel Nut Palms, Areca catechu cv. 'Dwarf', await transport to the holding area. They were sold as part of a large landscape design project. The 65-gallon and two 10-gallon-sized plants were actually waiting on two more 65-gallon-sized plants that were also part of the order. I had no knowledge of the design, but the way the customers were excited, I am sure the Palms are going to be planted as focal points.

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- 2:37PM - After the volunteer lunch, the sales area began to slow down a bit. Everyone was waiting for the late afternoon crowd, which comprises those who couldn't get away from work or school until later in the day. Typically, they arrive in staggered groups between 3:00 and 5:00 in the afternoon. Travis, Jeremy and Mark wait patiently.

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Post Tour - Searle Residence

- 5:36PM - The afternoon of the first Friday was busy as expected. After we finished up the day we made the short trip over to the Searle compound for food, drinks and the traditional Post Tour. Many had made the point to attend and they arrived at different times throughout the evening. With the first arrivals ready to 'walk, talk and drink' we exited the house onto the patio and started the tour by the pool. We were welcomed to the yard by the sounds of the waterfall.

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- With his favorite libation in hand, Jeff starts the tour on one leg. He and FM. Rick Hawkins (rick) hang out by the pools edge while waiting on others. In behind, they were shaded by a tall Beccariophoenix fenestralis, one of the oldest in the yard. (B) A Cobra Birds Nest Fern, Asplenium nidus 'Cobra', rests comfortably in a decorative pot. 

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- 5:37PM - A view from the patio, looking across the lawn to the full sun planting bed. In the foreground, a Chamaerops humilis var. argentea enjoys life growing in a blue glazed pot.

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- A large Ficus dammaropsis occupies a decent footprint near the pool and has branches and sections growing in all directions. It was tricky to photograph the entire plant, so I settled on a shot showing a couple leafy heads. (B) Near the patio's edge, an old Voanioala gerardii slowly grows larger and larger leaves. He is content, just not in a hurry.

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- It didn't take us long to cross the patio to a corner near the house where we got face-to-face with one of the Hybrid Sealing Wax Palms, Cyrtostachys sp. 'Hybrid', that reside in the yard. I had posted these photos in a separate topic, but this was a key moment in the tour. Jim Glock was acting as both tour guide and scale object as he introduced the palm to everyone. Many if not all of the tour attendees had seen the palm or a similar specimen before, but there was still that sense of awe. The main stem has flowered and as I mentioned in the other topic, we were not sure as to the timing of the inflorescence. Next time I will bring a ladder.

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- This specimen is more of the orange-yellow color form of the hybrid complex. Those internodes were really shiny, like someone went crazy with the Turtle Wax.

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A link to the other topic: Cyrtostachys sp. 'Hybrid' - A Quick View

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Palmarum

- 5:41PM - Without spilling a drop of beer, Jim leans over a bench to take a closer look at the Sabinaria magnifica. It was suffering from a bit of sunburn, as its source of shade, the Jungle King Ginger on the left, was trimmed back dramatically to make room for the table and chairs. This was in preparation for the holiday party that takes place here at the beginning of December.

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- One of many blooming orchids found in the yard this time of the year. It is either a Vanda or an × Ascocenda of some type.

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- This is one of a few palms Jeff plants in the yard to test those willing to try their identification skills. It is a recently planted Rhopaloblaste augusta. Members of Rhopaloblaste are great and stunning palms, they are just slow growing -- no matter where or how they are grown it seems. (B) A behemoth of a fan palm, a Copernicia gigas reigns as one of the largest palms in this area of the yard.

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- Tim and Jeff checkout a nearby Copernicia sp. that has been a mystery. Jeff mentioned it had recently flowered for the first time. (B,C) Not far across the way, the largest in a pair of Copernicia × vespertilionum was spreading its way towards the sky. On the right, the leaves of an Azul Palm, Coccothrinax macroglossa, can be seen. The palm has been fast growing, probably trying to reach more sun.

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- 5:47PM - The tour continued towards the east side of the yard before turning and following the path towards the south-east corner. We gathered for a while under the 'Copernicia forest' before continuing. Conversations were as varied as the plants we gazed upon. One species would trigger a discussion that would lead back to an event, another tour, a Biennial, a plant sale, etc. Jim, Rick and Jeff were diving deep into the memory of one event, as plant world familiar Jerry Schilling listens in on the left (in light blue). On the far left, Tim hears something funny from off in the distance as Darryl Windham (on the far right) from the Naples Zoo, checks out the area.

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- We moved along the path that winds back and forth along the east side of the property. We stopped for a second under a giant Attalea cohune that was dropping seed and heavy inflorescence spathes. Seen earlier in the day volunteering throughout the sale, IPS President & FM. Ray Hernandez (SubTropicRay) joined the tour at this point (towards the left in red, drink in hand) as Judy Glock was also in attendance.

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- Jim jumps ahead of the tour to get a closer look at one of his favorites, a robust and mature Orania palindan. The crown is full size and working its way through the canopy above. This palm was damaged by Hurricane Irma and has completely recovered.

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- It had a number of inflorescences in different growth stages. The seed and fruit are quite large and attractive when ripe. (B) A view of the crown from a different direction. Those silver leaf undersides never get boring.

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- 5:51PM - We followed the paved path until it reached the shed, then it diverts off into the backyard. This area is rich with Croton cultivars and there were many enthusiasts on the tour, so the talk bounced back and forth between Palms and Crotons. Jeff was looking back trying to see who was arriving. On the right in the pastel shorts is sale volunteer & FM. Scott Cohen (Scott Cohen), who arrived a few minutes earlier and found us by following the noise.

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- From the shed, I had a good view of a trunking Pelagodoxa henryana growing in a nearby bed full of Crotons.

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- Before we cleared the area, more and more people were arriving. Behind Tim and on the right, Doug Wood and FM. Tracy Sutherland (Tracy S) had joined the tour. (B) Scott (obscured) was trying to understand Crotons as they were being described by Judy and Tim on the right.

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- We had made the turn around the shed and headed towards the palm-laden corner of the yard known as Palm Circle. On the way I took a back-lit shot of one of three Samoan Dwarf Coconuts. Notice the long, stiff heavy leaves and the near lack of a petiole.

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Palmarum

- 5:55PM - We entered the domain of the Palm. This is the beginning of Palm Circle, one of the first areas of the yard planted with unusual palm species. It is also one of the areas protected against cold and wind. It is heavily planted and not just with palms but with other rare and exotic plants. A potted specimen of Johannesteijsmannia perakensis acts as a sentry, guarding the entrance to Palm Circle. (B) Imbued with style and charm, the giant leaves of a Kerriodoxa elegans cover a large area. Each leaf is over 8 ft. (2.4m) across and is perfectly flat. The entire palm is over 15 ft. (4.5m) across. It was impossible to capture it all in one photo. I took this popular contrasting shot of the bright white leaf underside and the jet black petioles.

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- We followed the narrow path around Palm Circle. With all the people and plants, it was difficult to back up far enough to photograph an entire plant. A mature Licuala fordiana was featuring numerous inflorescences, but only one ripe fruit the size of a pea. (B) An ongoing mystery surrounds this plant. This is an undescribed species of Drymophloeus known as sp. 'Patipi' or originally sp. 'Irian Jaya'. It still doesn't have a proper epithet and seems to exist only in cultivation. The name goes back a while; as the name Irian Jaya doesn't exist anymore, as the area was renamed West Papua. -whispers- "It may not even be a Drymophloeus".

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- Speaking of the genus Drymophloeus, this is Drymophloeus litigiosus. A mature plant that has since left the understory and emerged out into more sun, becoming part of the canopy. It was in the middle of some serious seed production. I hope some of them are viable. (C) At the bottom of the trunk, the base consisted of multiple layers of rigid stilt roots. The original aluminum tag can be seen in the upper left of the photo. It still has the old name of the palm, D. beguinii, before it was changed a few years ago.

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- Calyptrocalyx yamutumene, what an incredible palm. This species has shattered all expectations and perceptions of the genus. In addition to its very unique 'snake tongue' leaf and lack of a petiole, this species is easy to grow and quite cold tolerant. We can never have enough material. (C) Some of the next generation begins to ripen. The thickness of the flesh around the seed seems to vary a lot on this species. These were soft, thick and plump whereas others I have seen had just a thin, hard seed coat; just enough of a material to turn red. Both examples yielded viable seed.

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Palmarum

- 6:02PM - We had left Palm Circle and neighboring areas and headed straight west along the back of the property. This has always been the fastest route through the collection. I could tell people might be sensing the incredible food spread waiting for us. The path was crowded as the tour began to stretch out, as some people lingered in one area as others went ahead. Tim and Darryl check the identity of a plant on the right as others went ahead. (B) A group pauses in front of (and under) a specimen of Hydriastele dransfieldii. The grouped leaflets are a key characteristic of the species. Jim was giving it a good once-over.

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- A Searle epiphany in progress. A discussion was being thrown back and forth until Rick mentioned something significant and it caused Jeff to react with surprise, nearly pulling his beard off in the process.

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- Another view of the Hydriastele dransfieldii, showing the crownshaft and one starburst-like inflorescence. (B) A climbing specimen of variegated Swiss Cheese Plant, Monstera deliciosa cv. 'Thai Constellation'. The plant had a couple of heads. This one was in the process of blooming.

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- 6:10PM - Neoveitchia brunnea, a rare palm of note that received a lot of attention during the tour. Most refer to it as just "The other Neoveitchia". (B) We exited the pathways that run east and west through the backyard and entered the more open areas of the southwest corner. I found myself looking up into the crown of a tall Cyrtostachys elegans. I was recently asked if this palm had flowered, but it hasn't as far as I know. It seems large enough to be mature, but I wouldn't know for sure. I always try to look for any noticeable bulge in the crownshaft.

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Ryan

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Palmarum

- 6:10PM - Kylie and Maui greet one of the African Spurred (or spur-thigh) Tortoises, Centrochelys sulcata. We were hanging out near the edge of the enclosure, which tends to draw them over looking for food. They keep getting bigger. I do not know how much they weigh, but I know its a team effort to move one around. They spend most of their time in the enclosure, unless it's going to get very cold, then they go in the house.

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- We toured the back portion of the southwest corner, which had a mix of older, established trees and newly planted specimens. Kylie and Ray explore the giant petioles (and sharp margin spines) of a Talipot Palm, Corypha umbraculifera. The palm is massive and will still grow wider at the base before beginning to grow a trunk. I asked for a volunteer to climb the sharp-edged petioles but I had no takers. Not enough booze yet I guess.

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- On the left, long-time collector and grower Kathy had joined the tour a few moments prior. She joined the fun just as the jokes started to fly. Carson finds himself caught in the middle of it all. (B) A nearby clump of Red Torch Ginger, Etlingera elatior cv. 'Red', was blooming heavily. The blooms make incredible cut flowers.

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- 6:16PM - We made the big turn towards the north and headed for the front yard. We passed by the tortoise enclosure and a large Plumeria or Frangipani. (B) It probably has a specific cultivar name, but we just call it 'Dark Red'. The flowers are slightly smaller in size but have a great color and fragrance. Jeff usually propagates a few divisions now and then so small specimens have been known to appear the Extravaganza. If you know the actual cultivar name, post it here or let me know somehow.

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Palmarum

- 6:18PM - Everyone took a moment to pay respects to the great and powerful Tahina spectabilis. Darryl and Rick help out by posing with the giant palm. We still don't know how much wider it will get before forming a trunk, but due to its fast rate of growth, we will find out one day. Hopefully, nothing will happen to it or its huge leaves.

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- A new flush on a Brownea species. It is either B. grandiceps or B. macrophylla. I had just missed the peak of color. The color was probably brighter earlier in the day or the day before. (B) We reached the front yard and began to tour a new landscape bed that was started earlier in the year.

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- The new bed consisted of Palms, flowering trees, shrubs and a number of botanical oddities. Jeff begins by pointing out the different plants, as Jerry walks closer, heading towards a Milky Way Tree, Tabernaemontana litoralis.

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- Jeff showcases a newly planted specimen of Clavija domingensis. One of a few species that survives only in cultivation, as it is now extinct in habitat.

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

Corypha and Tahina :drool:Loves those giant stately palms 

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Palmarum

- 6:24PM - Another specimen of the Sealing Wax Hybrid, Cyrtostachys sp. 'Hybrid'. This one is part of the planting area adjacent to the front door and entry way. (B) With all these people walking around, Maui was getting super hyper. He was running at full speed and making wide circles around the tour group. He would be running at someone, then swerve at the last second. (C) I yelled "Maui!" and for a split second he stopped, panting heavily.

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- A total surprise for us, but we turned around one moment to see the arrival of IPS Director Jill Menzel. She was greeted by Jeff as the tour continued through the front yard. Jill was the architect and key developer of the 2010 IPS Biennial in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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- It had been a long day, but a good one. We were getting reports of when dinner would be ready. We were losing light fast as our appetites were guiding ourselves indoors. (B) The tall palm on the right is Archontophoenix myolensis I believe.

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- 6:30PM - This is a peculiar palm. We had been watching this plant grow for years while in a pot and wasn't sure what it was. When it was small, we figured it was a clustering specimen of Hydriastele beguinii, as the stems were so close to one another. When it grew larger, we examined the base carefully and discovered it was a triple. A single seedling had grown originally with two other seed in a pot. With time the other two germinated and made the single a triple. A very cool, one-time specimen made by chance.

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- 6:30PM - Planted at the feet of the triple specimen seen above, was this grouping of Dwarf Blue Podocarpus, which was a new plant for me. The new growth emerges in a powdery blue color.

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- The front of the house was one of the last stops of the Post Tour. Others had gone inside in search of appetizers or beverages, or both. From where the group is standing, you can look in and through the plants to a window that shows the kitchen; filled with people moving about.

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- 6:35PM - The Bentinckia nicobarica growing in the bed seen above deserved a closer look. It was sporting a bushy assemblage of inflorescences. You can see the crescent Moon appearing in the sky, above the 3 o'clock leaf (middle right of frame). (B) I rounded the corner on my way inside when I spotted Jill walking along the driveway, looking through the yard. She was in a perfect spot to be framed in a portrait with the giant Bismarck Palms, Bismarckia nobilis.

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- Before entering the house via the garage, I took a second to photograph the Reinhardtia paiewonskiana that resides along the walkway to the patio. A favorite of many who tour the yard, as few can ever identify it. (B) Notice the inflorescence at the 12 o'clock position in the frame. It is so small compared to the size of the palm.

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Inside, we were treated to a lavish dinner spread provided by Jim & Judy Glock who never disappoint in their culinary artistry. We also got to sample an array of appetizers and desserts brought by attendees of the post tour. We spent the evening discussing the day, from what sold at the sale, which collectors we talked with, what we saw on the tour and on and on. No aspect of the palm and plant world was ignored. I was thinking of taking photos of the dinner, but I was too hungry.

Ryan

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GottmitAlex

Wünderbar! 

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Palmarum

Saturday, October 5th

- 9:07AM - The morning of the second day was not as hectic, but we still tried to get as much restocking done as we could before we opened. When we did open at eight, it came and went as a blur as tagging plants merged with answering plant questions as customers were waiting to enter. Along the main road, customers had reached every sale section, including the shadehouse. Center of the frame, Candy can be seen using her design magic to help a customer duo with their landscape idea. (B) Jeff goes flying past on a golf cart on his way to pull plants.

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- Legendary horticulturalist and plantsman, Derek Burch arrives to volunteer at the 'Ganza. His specialties are many and his knowledge and wisdom seem to have no boundaries.

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- We had a bit of a pause in the sales area. A tree trimming truck came through to dump mulch at the nursery, so we had to clear a path. (B) The Tropical Fruit Tree section is often the first stop for customers. The first weekend thinned out the section, but we had some items to restock for the second.

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- 9:23AM - All hands on deck. It started to get busy and I had to get back to the shadehouse. There were more than enough red shirts up front.

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- 10:08AM - Talk about timing. When you have that very rare, slow growing palm that gets an incredible new red leaf -- it's nice when the palm performs at the right time during a sale. I will let you guess how long the Iguanura wallichiana var. major remained on the table. (B) If that isn't a flag to wave down a palm nut, I don't know what is.

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- I didn't have time to make a sign to promote Jeff's Youtube channel, so Travis made one on the spot. (B) Tim does not need a cart. He assists in the restocking efforts by carrying a 7 gal. Fiddle-Leaf Fig, Ficus lyrata, out to the side road.

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- 11:22AM - The slow pace of the first hour turned into a storm as we got closer to lunch time. It got too busy to take photos so I had to put the camera down for a while. Staff and volunteers got stretched thin across the sales area. Ray was in the thick of it as he and I never left the shadehouse intersection or even the sidewalk for a couple hours.

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- Yes, he is eating that. Scott and his own invention, the 'bun-less' hamburger. Two patties stuck together with mustard and dipped in beans. I guess lunch is being served. Hunger was giving me the gumption to try and make it out of the shadehouse. (B) As the sidewalk was busy, I decided to take the long way 'round...

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 Ryan

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Palmarum

- 11:23AM - I headed out via the side entrance to the shadehouse, answering questions along the way. The tables were taking a beating. Very few of the gallon species could be restocked, so gaps were developing across the table cloths. (B) An early morning surprise in the form of a gallon palm. An extremely rare, if not, ultra rare Coccothrinax garciana was pulled on a whim and added to the tables. The species was not available on Friday, thus was not on the sale list. This move was so unexpected that the species didn't have a card (I had no clue one would be put out). This is one of a few plants made possible by a dedicated collection trip to Cuba. We needed a conference among the palm people just to decide on the price.

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- I made it outside to find it, yup... busy as expected. Questions and location queries followed me outside. (B) A customer checks out a variegated Christmas Palm, Adonidia merrillii var. 'variegated', in among the full sun palm section.

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- 11:39AM - An impromptu landscape layout was interrupted. I guess lunch was the culprit. A 7 gal. Dioon spinulosum was surrounded by white, Frankie Hipp Ixoras. (B) Many customers find the Bromeliad section irresistible. There are always a lot to choose from, including many varieties and hybrids that are new as of this sale.

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- Candy weaves her design skill like that of an artist wielding a paintbrush. She pictures it all in her head. (B) I decided to cover the front area before getting lunch. The thrall of activity drew me over as customers were streaming in.

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