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Chris Chance

Tree recommendations needed

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Chris Chance
1 hour ago, Briank said:

I get it.  I really do.   If you ever want a Rainbow Euc, hit up Josh.   Always has some. Keep digging man, there’s a ton of great trees.   I wish I had more room too.  Would love to plant more Tropical Trees. 

Josh is always has the cool stuff! I am limited on space but the front is bigger than it seems in the pictures.  The second picture is the area I plan to plant.

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Silas_Sancona
19 hours ago, Chris Chance said:

Another shot.

20191026_145921.jpg

Is the spot your looking to plant located closer to the corner, near the fire hydrant?, or where the planter is ( to the left of the walkway ..front entrance? or side gate that leads into your back yard? ) 

Looks like the end of your yard slopes towards the right a little? Assuming your driveway/ garage are situated further to the left from where you're standing ( not in the pictures )  Hard to judge in the pics. Wish I could see how the lot/ yard is laid out from above..  

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Chris Chance

I got a satellite picture to show where I'm thinking about planting the tree. I circled the area. 

20191028_092654.jpg

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Silas_Sancona
1 hour ago, Chris Chance said:

I got a satellite picture to show where I'm thinking about planting the tree. I circled the area. 

20191028_092654.jpg

:greenthumb:  Ah, I see now..  Depending on where the water / sewer / cable lines are located, and what, if any future plans you might have for the path on the right ( currently pavers )  between your front entrance and the sidewalk,  I might center the tree more to the left of the circle ( in front of the palm in the center of the yard, closer to the street/ corner ) and use the circled area for more palms.  Depending on what tree you decide on, it can be enjoyed from your living room. Can see something like a Trumpet Tree ( or some other choice w/ a similar height/ width profile ) filling that spot nicely.. Sweetshade ( Hymenosporum ) might be too narrow / look a bit out of place. It might be a better fit for the bed outside your living room area, depending on any plans you might have there.  Some thoughts anyway..

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Chris Chance
1 hour ago, Silas_Sancona said:

:greenthumb:  Ah, I see now..  Depending on where the water / sewer / cable lines are located, and what, if any future plans you might have for the path on the right ( currently pavers )  between your front entrance and the sidewalk,  I might center the tree more to the left of the circle ( in front of the palm in the center of the yard, closer to the street/ corner ) and use the circled area for more palms.  Depending on what tree you decide on, it can be enjoyed from your living room. Can see something like a Trumpet Tree ( or some other choice w/ a similar height/ width profile ) filling that spot nicely.. Sweetshade ( Hymenosporum ) might be too narrow / look a bit out of place. It might be a better fit for the bed outside your living room area, depending on any plans you might have there.  Some thoughts anyway..

Thanks for your input! Water lines and what not are on the other side of the driveway.  I was hoping to plant something that doesn't have too much spread. Eventually when the grass is removed I plan on planting a lot more in that area. I was thinking about putting the tree in the circled area to keep the front more open looking. The planter in front of the window is going to have some roses since my wife really wants them. Personally I wanted to plant palms in that area but I can't take the whole yard.

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Silas_Sancona
8 minutes ago, Chris Chance said:

Thanks for your input! Water lines and what not are on the other side of the driveway.  I was hoping to plant something that doesn't have too much spread. Eventually when the grass is removed I plan on planting a lot more in that area. I was thinking about putting the tree in the circled area to keep the front more open looking. The planter in front of the window is going to have some roses since my wife really wants them. Personally I wanted to plant palms in that area but I can't take the whole yard.

Lol, I hear ya..  The bed where your wife is considering a rose garden might be a good spot for a Plumeria.. say toward the back.. Something taller and leafy,  with the roses wrapping around it.. then there's always something fragrant to smell when outside, coming up to the house, or when the window is open. Seems like an odd pairing but have seen it work and look good. Might also add to the overall theme later on.  Again, just throwing around some ideas.. ( and aid in keeping the tropical look going, lol )

See what youre saying about where you were thinking on planting the tree.. would def.  work in that spot also.  My thought about nudging toward the left was to balance out the yard overall since your lot has a somewhat diamond shape, as a pose to a complete square / rectangle..  

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Chris Chance
19 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Lol, I hear ya..  The bed where your wife is considering a rose garden might be a good spot for a Plumeria.. say toward the back.. Something taller and leafy,  with the roses wrapping around it.. then there's always something fragrant to smell when outside, coming up to the house, or when the window is open. Seems like an odd pairing but have seen it work and look good. Might also add to the overall theme later on.  Again, just throwing around some ideas.. ( and aid in keeping the tropical look going, lol )

See what youre saying about where you were thinking on planting the tree.. would def.  work in that spot also.  My thought about nudging toward the left was to balance out the yard overall since your lot has a somewhat diamond shape, as a pose to a complete square / rectangle..  

I like your idea with the plumeria! My wife likes them and the place they do best here is near the house. I have one that is starting to get big here and looking to trim it up in the spring. I would like to try some other species that do well inland. 

Eventually when I remove the grass I will be planting palms all over. We plan on doing it in a weekend so it's done quickly because of the association.  Going to run pathways around and make it a bit like the backyard which is a jungle now. I think once I do that it will look good with the tree planted in that area. For now just have to get the association off my back. 

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Silas_Sancona
47 minutes ago, Chris Chance said:

I like your idea with the plumeria! My wife likes them and the place they do best here is near the house. I have one that is starting to get big here and looking to trim it up in the spring. I would like to try some other species that do well inland. 

 

Take a look at Jungle Jacks,  Broke down many of the Plumeria cultivars he offers into various lists focused on such things as coastal / desert favorites,  easy growers / early bloomers, scent, etc..  Remember, White/ Yellows are usually the easiest, dark Red the most difficult, sensitive to cold, wet.. or can be.. 

Raspberry Sundae, Musk Rainbow, Daisy Wilcox, Charlotte Ebert,  Mele Pa Bowman, or any of the Rainbow- colored Moragne hybrids are some of the nicest, produce some of the biggest flowers also.

 

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Jcalvin

Hard to beat a smaller Magnolia, like a Little Gem. But they require much more humidity and water, so I don't think that's viable.

It's not very tropical, but a Drake Elm is elegant and a very fast grower. Provides plenty of shade, too.

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Hillizard
7 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Take a look at Jungle Jacks,  Broke down many of the Plumeria cultivars he offers into various lists focused on such things as coastal / desert favorites,  easy growers / early bloomers, scent, etc..  Remember, White/ Yellows are usually the easiest, dark Red the most difficult, sensitive to cold, wet.. or can be.. 

Raspberry Sundae, Musk Rainbow, Daisy Wilcox, Charlotte Ebert,  Mele Pa Bowman, or any of the Rainbow- colored Moragne hybrids are some of the nicest, produce some of the biggest flowers also.

 

Chris Chance: Along with Nathan's suggestion, you might also check out the Plumeria inventory at www.uplandnursery.com/index.php in Tustin in Orange County. They do mail order of rooted and unrooted Plumeria cuttings. I've ordered plants from them in the past.

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greysrigging

Do any of you guys grow Lagerstroemia speciosa ie the Pride of India.... its a tropical Crepe Myrtle.... extensively planted in Northern and Eastern tropical and sub tropical Australia. A hardy and robust tree, colourful flowers and thrives on neglect in my climate. Not sure of its hardiness.....

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Matt in OC

Late to this, but no votes for Spathodea (African Tulip)?

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Chris Chance
23 hours ago, Hillizard said:

Chris Chance: Along with Nathan's suggestion, you might also check out the Plumeria inventory at www.uplandnursery.com/index.php in Tustin in Orange County. They do mail order of rooted and unrooted Plumeria cuttings. I've ordered plants from them in the past.

I'll check that out! Thank you!

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Chris Chance
14 hours ago, greysrigging said:

Do any of you guys grow Lagerstroemia speciosa ie the Pride of India.... its a tropical Crepe Myrtle.... extensively planted in Northern and Eastern tropical and sub tropical Australia. A hardy and robust tree, colourful flowers and thrives on neglect in my climate. Not sure of its hardiness.....

After research I don't know it would like my winters here. Cool looking tree though. 

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Chris Chance
3 hours ago, Matt in OC said:

Late to this, but no votes for Spathodea (African Tulip)?

I really like that one! It says online it's a zone 10 so probably would have a problem with a bad winter here. 

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Silas_Sancona
On 10/30/2019 at 4:34 PM, Chris Chance said:

After research I don't know it would like my winters here. Cool looking tree though. 

 

On 10/30/2019 at 4:35 PM, Chris Chance said:

I really like that one! It says online it's a zone 10 so probably would have a problem with a bad winter here. 

Queens Crepe should do fine where you're located.  Will drop leaves in a colder winter, but pretty tough. Far better looking than traditional Crepe Myrtles too. 

Between the two, African Tulip Trees can be more sensitive than Queens Crepe, especially  when younger, during cooler, wet winters.  One of my favorties also, just gotta get them past the first couple winters, Can take acouple more degs of occasional cold with more wood. 

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greysrigging

What about Cape Chestnuts ( Calodendrum capense ) in a Californian climate ? They thrive in the Sydney basin out west, with an extreme temp range of 114f and 24f at my mothers place in Camden, NSW.
A street planting in Campbelltown and Camden. Spectacular flower show as the article attached shows...
https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/macarthur/cape-chestnut-tree-at-mawson-park-in-full-bloom-after-more-than-a-decade/news-story/29fffb163101c1876572c994005f740d
Wont grow in Darwin, but they like a Mediterranean climate.....
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calodendrum_capense

Edited by greysrigging
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Silas_Sancona
8 hours ago, greysrigging said:

What about Cape Chestnuts ( Calodendrum capense ) in a Californian climate ? They thrive in the Sydney basin out west, with an extreme temp range of 114f and 24f at my mothers place in Camden, NSW.
A street planting in Campbelltown and Camden. Spectacular flower show as the article attached shows...
https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/macarthur/cape-chestnut-tree-at-mawson-park-in-full-bloom-after-more-than-a-decade/news-story/29fffb163101c1876572c994005f740d
Wont grow in Darwin, but they like a Mediterranean climate.....
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calodendrum_capense

Great tree and is pretty common in Southern CA. Unfortunately, being in the Citrus family, it is a host for the Citrus Psyllid and Greening Disease these insects can carry, so, you'd have to harvest seed off established specimens if you wanted one in the garden since they will likely be harder to find in nurseries. 

Dias cotinifolia ( Hibiscus family ), which looks similar, might be a safer alternative. Beautiful tree, just harder to find though ( for now ) 

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Hillizard
1 hour ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Great tree and is pretty common in Southern CA. Unfortunately, being in the Citrus family, it is a host for the Citrus Psyllid and Greening Disease these insects can carry, so, you'd have to harvest seed off established specimens if you wanted one in the garden since they will likely be harder to find in nurseries. 

Dias cotinifolia ( Hibiscus family ), which looks similar, might be a safer alternative. Beautiful tree, just harder to find though ( for now ) 

This is where I got my Dais cotinifolia via mail order: http://www.anniesannuals.com/plants/view/?id=2862  One of the two I have in the ground bloomed for me the first time this year. This species doesn't appear to 'like' hot, dry conditions.

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greysrigging

Ok.... what about these ones ?
20170610_110323.thumb.jpg.b4e3e1c03eec5e228dcdc813c2751eb6.jpg20170610_110520.thumb.jpg.8aa13ca4e6d82c61ff0a5ab2b5290492.jpg20170610_110434.thumb.jpg.d125be16a9d3d643b1d85923d054283a.jpg
Can't remember the name of the white flowering shrub/tree, but the other one is a Poincettia
20170610_110450.thumb.jpg.1e379ab8a47ee9770c9f8d38ecde4ca6.jpg
And the ornamental Pear Tree is colourful in Fall ( as pictured June, Camden, NSW ) and in Spring when in full blossom.
20170610_111636.thumb.jpg.e8a1ba3ca17c3c03fe57732e44f0b76d.jpg20170610_111736.thumb.jpg.3529066a30c5fc726113fe17fe00c293.jpg
 

 

 

 

20170610_110510.jpg

Edited by greysrigging
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Silas_Sancona
9 hours ago, greysrigging said:

Ok.... what about these ones ?
20170610_110323.thumb.jpg.b4e3e1c03eec5e228dcdc813c2751eb6.jpg20170610_110520.thumb.jpg.8aa13ca4e6d82c61ff0a5ab2b5290492.jpg20170610_110434.thumb.jpg.d125be16a9d3d643b1d85923d054283a.jpg
Can't remember the name of the white flowering shrub/tree, but the other one is a Poincettia
20170610_110450.thumb.jpg.1e379ab8a47ee9770c9f8d38ecde4ca6.jpg
And the ornamental Pear Tree is colourful in Fall ( as pictured June, Camden, NSW ) and in Spring when in full blossom.
20170610_111636.thumb.jpg.e8a1ba3ca17c3c03fe57732e44f0b76d.jpg20170610_111736.thumb.jpg.3529066a30c5fc726113fe17fe00c293.jpg
 

 

 

 

20170610_110510.jpg

Nice to see Poinsettia, looking like a Poinsettia.. Rarely see these in yards anymore here in places like California or Florida, even where some of the bigger growers are / were located.  White flowered Composite looks like Tree Daisy, one of the Montanoa sp. maybe, anyway.. another ol' trimer you don't see much in gardens here.. but should.  

Ornamental Pears are actually commonly used ...or, should I say,  ..were used.. in new housing developments in California a few decades ago.  Issue w/ them is they are poorly adapted to the warmer winters there, and end up infested by various pests / diseases. Most cultivars are also prone to being severely damaged in storms.  Back east, one of the varieties has escaped and is invading adjacent areas.  Like Privets, ( Ligustrum sp. ) I myself get raging headaches if near them for any length of time when in flower. 

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greysrigging
On 10/31/2019 at 6:00 AM, Matt in OC said:

Late to this, but no votes for Spathodea (African Tulip)?

An 'old school' Darwin tree that has fallen out of favour in the modern era, in fact it is a Declared Weed in Brisbane and other parts of Queensland. It has lovely flowers, but the nectar is highly toxic to our native Australian bees.  It is also prone to dropping branches during storms and seems to attract every pest insect, wood borers and termites.
http://bobthebeeman.com.au/african-tulip-tree-ebook.asp
https://weeds.brisbane.qld.gov.au/weeds/african-tulip-tree

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JasonD

Pink tabebuia does well in SoCal valley climates. It's a spectacular bloomer in the spring: https://selectree.calpoly.edu/tree-detail/handroanthus-impetiginosus

Also, the SelecTree website from which the profile comes is a fantastic resource for the kind of decision you are making: https://selectree.calpoly.edu/ 

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Silas_Sancona
18 hours ago, greysrigging said:

For those in Florida and warm subtropical regions, you could try this one..... common in Darwin, I have some in my back yard rain forest....
https://www.territorynativeplants.com.au/peltophorum-pterocarpum-yellow-flame-tree

 

Actually, this sp. and a relative, Peltophorum dubium are well established in the nursery trade across Florida.. no where else though for some odd reason..

P. dubium is the most commonly seen due to pretty good cold tolerance.  Believe it was used extensively in some parts of Orlando, maybe in Tampa also in years past.  Big tree.. and absolutely stunning when flowering in late August/ September. Would pass several to and from where I worked in Sarasota when living in Bradenton.  Not sure why, but this species hasn't been trailed much ( if at all ) anywhere in California, but should be. Cold shouldn't be an issue in most areas.  Probably best for larger lots / in parks though. 

Not sure if P. pterocarpum gets as big as P. dubium since most of the ones I'd see when I lived in Clearwater were younger / had been planted recently.  Great tree though.. Very fragrant flowers.  Supposed to be a bit more cold sensitive but thinking it would probably do well in the warmer parts of Southern California.  Can't remember if anyone in the area had mentioned it being tried in the past. 

Much less commonly seen Peltophorum africanum is the only sp. I've seen in California ( and here,  but nowhere in Florida, interestingly.. ) Specimen I remember from the Los Angeles Arboretum had some good size when I'd seen it. Assume it's still there.  Tallest one I've seen here ( @  Desert Botanical )  is about 10' in height. Flowers and sets seed but always seem to miss flowers when I visit.  Nice tree but not quite as eye catching as the other two sp. Imo.. With so many different trees that produce yellow flowers / Ferny foliage here, this tree kind of blends in. 

Have specimens of both P. africanum and P. dubium that have managed to survive for me. My tortured P. africanum  has survived more abuse than pretty much anything else I grow.  Almost acts like a Caudiciform- type tree.  My P.  dubium is currently sharing a pot w/ one of my Aloe "Hurcules" cuttings. 

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greysrigging

Another nice Aussie flowering tree is the Xanthostemon chrysanthus ( Golden Penda ). Common street tree along the Queensland coast.
We have one called Xanthostemon paradoxus native to the Top End of the Northern Territory, a tougher variety that handles our harsh, hot climate very well..
Beautiful yellow flowers full of nectar that attracts birds and bees.
50751102_2061428773894589_3923983143551369216_o.jpg.559dad885e31e4cceab3fa823d933c4c.jpg50903719_2272063059479359_9192338205196681216_o.jpg.9723ffbbb1ef75869adeb3b3e3c5cda2.jpg

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Xenon
7 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Actually, this sp. and a relative, Peltophorum dubium are well established in the nursery trade across Florida.. no where else though for some odd reason..

 

See them occasionally in RGV in Texas, one of the "older" introductions. I believe most of them are P. pterocarpum, the more cold tender species. Seems to be quite a bit more hardy than Delonix regia. 

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Silas_Sancona
5 hours ago, Xenon said:

See them occasionally in RGV in Texas, one of the "older" introductions. I believe most of them are P. pterocarpum, the more cold tender species. Seems to be quite a bit more hardy than Delonix regia. 

Interesting and good to know..  i'd heard sometime ago that P. pterocarpum was on par, hardiness wise, with Delonix regia ...with P. dubium being the most cold tolerant..  If P. pterocarpum is indeed a couple degrees harder than Royal Poinciana, should do fine in S. Cal. 

In my earler post, forgot that there are some ..most likely P. dubium specimens.. planted near the Zoo in San Diego, possibly a couple other spots around town. 

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mnorell

There has been a very large Peltophorum dubium at the Huntington in San Marino for many years. It is located along the path between "subtropical hill" and the jungle garden. Assuming it is still there (it was the last time I looked a few years ago), it has always flowers precociously, at least it did every year that I thought about looking for it there. A very big tree unfortunately crammed in with I think a big old Jacaranda and if you just walk along the path down the grade toward the jungle you probably won't realize you're walking under it. I wouldn't recommend P. pterocarpum for SoCal since it is definitely more tropical in its requirements; and the fact of the matter is that P. dubium is showier. To see the many blooming specimens in central Florida during a good year is amazing. Also P. dubium is a late spring (mainly June if I remember) bloomer in Central Florida (and I think a similar timing in California). I have always noticed that P. pterocarpum is a summer-late summer bloomer in South Florida and the Keys, since that is a time when not many other flowering trees are in bloom there.

And I used to admire the P. africanum at the L.A. Arboretum back in the '80s where it would bloom and set seed (I remember collecting some). It was quite a small tree as I recall so perhaps a better size for your needs than P. dubium. It is not as showy as the other two species but still nice, and I agree probably very valuable for dry/desert areas with not too much irrigation needed.

Another tree you might consider is the White Geiger Tree (Cordia boisseri). A very nice tree that is not too big and that thrives in inland California and is quite hardy to cold, much hardier than its showier Orange Geiger Tree (Cordia sebestena) in South Florida and the Caribbean. You can find it for sale at nurseries in the Coachella Valley, so possibly in the Riverside area as well.

 

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Silas_Sancona
3 hours ago, mnorell said:

There has been a very large Peltophorum dubium at the Huntington in San Marino for many years. It is located along the path between "subtropical hill" and the jungle garden. Assuming it is still there (it was the last time I looked a few years ago), it has always flowers precociously, at least it did every year that I thought about looking for it there. A very big tree unfortunately crammed in with I think a big old Jacaranda and if you just walk along the path down the grade toward the jungle you probably won't realize you're walking under it. I wouldn't recommend P. pterocarpum for SoCal since it is definitely more tropical in its requirements; and the fact of the matter is that P. dubium is showier. To see the many blooming specimens in central Florida during a good year is amazing. Also P. dubium is a late spring (mainly June if I remember) bloomer in Central Florida (and I think a similar timing in California). I have always noticed that P. pterocarpum is a summer-late summer bloomer in South Florida and the Keys, since that is a time when not many other flowering trees are in bloom there.

And I used to admire the P. africanum at the L.A. Arboretum back in the '80s where it would bloom and set seed (I remember collecting some). It was quite a small tree as I recall so perhaps a better size for your needs than P. dubium. It is not as showy as the other two species but still nice, and I agree probably very valuable for dry/desert areas with not too much irrigation needed.

Another tree you might consider is the White Geiger Tree (Cordia boisseri). A very nice tree that is not too big and that thrives in inland California and is quite hardy to cold, much hardier than its showier Orange Geiger Tree (Cordia sebestena) in South Florida and the Caribbean. You can find it for sale at nurseries in the Coachella Valley, so possibly in the Riverside area as well.

 

Good to know about the P. dubium specimen located at the Huntington.. Will have to look for it when I return to the garden after the move back that way. 

 Interesting thoughts on this species flowering time. As I'd mentioned, most of the dubium specimens id see daily when i lived in Pinellas county and more often while living in Bradenton/ working in Sarasota flowered mid/ late summer, usually after the Poinciana, and before Bulnesia arborea ( only encountered a few in that part of the state ) P. pterocarpum we stocked in the nursery I worked for in Sarasota, and some others planted near Kopsick in St. Pete were the " Yellow Poinciana/ Copper Pods" that were flowering in late spring.. 

P. africanum I have came from seed I'd collected below the tree at the L.A. Arboretum. 

Agree about Texas Olive, Great tree,  though a bit messy once it starts dumping fruits.  Will be interesting to see how my Orange Geiger does in San Diego.. Growing well after nearly 4 years here in Chandler..  Same with both my Guaiacum sanctum and G. officinale specimens..  G. sanctum is on its second year producing fruits/ seed. 

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Silas_Sancona
On 11/29/2019 at 10:34 PM, greysrigging said:

Another nice Aussie flowering tree is the Xanthostemon chrysanthus ( Golden Penda ). Common street tree along the Queensland coast.
We have one called Xanthostemon paradoxus native to the Top End of the Northern Territory, a tougher variety that handles our harsh, hot climate very well..
Beautiful yellow flowers full of nectar that attracts birds and bees.
50751102_2061428773894589_3923983143551369216_o.jpg.559dad885e31e4cceab3fa823d933c4c.jpg50903719_2272063059479359_9192338205196681216_o.jpg.9723ffbbb1ef75869adeb3b3e3c5cda2.jpg

Wish either of these sp. were more available here in the states..   Occasionally see Golden Penda ( X. chrysanthus ) offered for sale in Florida. 

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