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Chester B

Southern Oregon - Brookings

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Chester B

I made my first trip to Brookings, Oregon and I was not disappointed in what I saw.  Lots of exotics that I can't grow here in Portland and many of them were huge.  I had 10 minutes that I was granted to drive around and snap photos.  I seemed totally suspicious so only managed to get a few decent shots.  Unfortunately I wasn't able to get any photos of Washingtonia palms.  I did also see some Pygmy date palms planted in a front of a store but had not idea as to how long they had been in the ground.  Apparently Brookings has an unusual climate.  I took this from Wikipedia

The Brookings area has a cool-summer mediterranean climate (Köppen climate classification Csb).  According to the Trewartha climate classification, it has a subtropical climate (despite being a little farther north than Chicago in latitude) and is among one of the northernmost North American locations to have one.

Brookings has cool winters during which intense rainfall is broken by weeks of cool, sunny weather. It has mild, dry summers with average rainfall in July and August of less than 1 inch (25 mm) per month. There are an average of only two afternoons annually with high temperatures of 90 °F (32.2 °C) or higher and an average of 1.5 mornings with low temperatures of 32 °F (0 °C) or lower. The record high temperature was 108.2 °F (42.3 °C) on July 9, 2008. The record low temperature was 18 °F (−7.8 °C) on December 8, 1972.

The wettest calendar year in Brookings was 1996 with 123.90 inches (3,147 mm) and the driest 1976 with 43.34 inches (1,100.8 mm). The most rainfall in one month was 36.90 inches (937.3 mm) in December 1996. The most rainfall in 24 hours was 17.00 inches (431.8 mm) on October 14, 2016. Snow is rare in Brookings, averaging only 0.7 inches or 0.018 metres per year, but 10 inches (0.25 m) fell in January 1916.[17]

Due to its location, Brookings is subject to winter (and less frequently summer) temperatures considered unusually warm for the Oregon Coast or for that matter, the North Coast of California. Temperatures can reach 70 to 100 °F (21.1 to 37.8 °C) throughout the year. This is due mostly to its situation at the foot of the Klamath Mountains, from which winds compress and warm the air flowing onto Brookings. This is called the Brookings effect or Chetco effect, similar to the warm dry Santa Ana winds of coastal Southern California.

Brookings CIDP 1.JPG

Brookings CIDP 2.JPG

Brookings CIDP 4.JPG

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Chester B

More

Brookings CIDP 5.JPG

Brookings CIDP.JPG

Brookings Norfolk.JPG

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Chester B

Agaves and Princess flowers were everywhere

Brookings Agave 1.JPG

Brookings Agave.JPG

Brookings Princess Flower 1.JPG

Brookings Princess Flower 2.JPG

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Chester B

Cordylines and Yucca Gigantea??

Brookings Cordyline.JPG

Brookings Yucca and CIDP.JPG

Brookings Yucca Gigantea 1.JPG

Brookings Yucca Gigantea.JPG

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SailorBold

Wow !!  that is amazing..    So what is the zone?  Everything looks great..

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Silas_Sancona

Also quite surprised to see  stuff like Araucaria, Tibochina ( Princess Flower ) that far north.  Makes me wonder what other surprises are grown up there. 

Pretty sure the Yucca in your pictures is indeed Yucca elephantes / gigantea.. 

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Chester B
13 hours ago, SailorBold said:

Wow !!  that is amazing..    So what is the zone?  Everything looks great..

It’s zone 9b. I think I just scratched the surface on what people were growing there. Lots of plants I didn’t recognize. Big eucalyptus everywhere as well as citrus trees. 
 

Now I want to get a vacation property there just to have the garden. 
 

 

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Meangreen94z

Crazy that a town with the equivalent latitude of Chicago has just as warm/warmer winters than we have here in Houston. But that’s what the Pacific does. Beautiful pictures.

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Briank

I’ve been looking for about yr to buy property on Oregon Coast.  Waiting for right property.   Climate looks good there. 

 

 

Curious on your comment you were granted 10 min to drive around n take pics ?  Ummm seems odd,  and you should be able to drive around take as many photos n tour all you want your not on private property.   I know some people can be weirded out but still...... can’t control air.  Like telling a smoker you can’t smoke outside lol 

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Chester B

My wife wasn’t quite as enthusiastic as I was, hence the 10 or 15 minutes. :rolleyes:

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Meangreen94z

Tell me about it. My wife thinks I’m crazy. There’s far less healthy interests/hobbies. 

Edited by Meangreen94z
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pin38

Everything looks very lush and healthy. I wonder if Brookings's relative isolation from other palmy areas will help prevent the spread of diseases and pests like the Red Palm Weevil. Nice pics!

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PlantDad
On 10/12/2019 at 5:38 PM, Chester B said:

Cordylines and Yucca Gigantea??

Brookings Cordyline.JPG

Brookings Yucca and CIDP.JPG

Brookings Yucca Gigantea 1.JPG

Brookings Yucca Gigantea.JPG

The first picture is of cordyline australis

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PlantDad

wow i am so jealous. that is amazing. you know the rent and cost of living there is much less than up here in Salem, Keizer, and Portland. i am debating on moving there

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PlantDad
On 10/13/2019 at 2:09 PM, Meangreen94z said:

Crazy that a town with the equivalent latitude of Chicago has just as warm/warmer winters than we have here in Houston. But that’s what the Pacific does. Beautiful pictures.

The global wind currents flow from west to east and that is why our coast is so much more mild than the east coast. East coast states actually function more like a continental climate and have little influence from the atlantic ocean. Florida is obviously different but that is due to other factors.

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