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PalmTreeDude

Sabal minor 'Congaree' Look So Cool!

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PalmTreeDude

The Sabal minor population in and around Congaree National Park, which is just Southeast of Columbia, South Carolina, look really cool. They have basically 360° fronds that stick kind of upright. Look at this observation of them that I saw on iNaturalist in their habitat. I would recommend looking around the observation map as well, you can literally see the different ecotypes around the Southeast. 

 https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/10726721

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mdsonofthesouth

Beautiful! Wonder their hardiness lol.

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kinzyjr
8 minutes ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

Beautiful! Wonder their hardiness lol.

Given their provenance is near Colombia, SC - at least down to single digits.

201910092250_ColombiaSC_Weather.png

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Flow

Excellent find. How I would like me some seeds^_^.

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PalmatierMeg

I agree with Flow. Someone in the area needs to collect seeds of this variety so it can be cultivated for other palm lovers.

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RJ

I'm not far from there. 

 

I also go by I native stand on the way to work. I should take a look at those. They're good sized I know that. When the leaves drop they stand out off in the woods. 

Edited by RJ
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Nj Palms
1 hour ago, RJ said:

I'm not far from there. 

 

I also go by I native stand on the way to work. I should take a look at those. They're good sized I know that. When the leaves drop they stand out off in the woods. 

Any seeds or small seedlings?

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RJ
32 minutes ago, Nj Palms said:

Any seeds or small seedlings?

Not sure. Always just admired them from afar. If it's not a washout this weekend I'll try to check them out. 

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