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palmsOrl

Post your Cyrtostachys!

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palmsOrl

This thread is for any Palmtalk member growing any species or variety/color variant/cultivar/hybrid/mutation, etc. within the genus Cyrtostachys.  This may include, but is not limited to:  Cyrtostachys renda, C. renda yellow, C. renda orange, C. renda "Ruby", C. renda brown, C. renda green (?), C. renda "Apple", C. renda "Theodora Buhler", C. renda "Watermelon", C. renda variegated, Cyrtostachys glauca, Cyrtostachys elegans, Cyrtostachys loriae, Cyrtostachys bakeri, Cyrtostachys "Hybrid".

To start, here is my new Cyrtostachys renda "Apple", thought to actually be of hybrid origin.  I will periodically post updates on this one as the palm grows.

20191008_211318.jpg

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The Gerg

I wish I could. :huh:

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Rickybobby

How bout a bag full of germinated seedlings!

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redant

My hybrid from Jeff Marcus several years ago, present day picture.

IMG_1921.JPG

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palmsOrl

It has been posted on Palmtalk before, but here is my Cyrtostachys glauca, circa October 2009.  The roots stayed too chilly during the 2009-2010 and it died of a fungal infection.

299px-C._glauca_resizedz.jpg

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palmsOrl

Here is a photo of my Cyrtostachys renda from February 2011 at my parent's former house.  I had this palm from 2003-2016 and grew it from a 1' size to a large palm.  It became unweildy and I planted in the ground in my greenhouse and it burnt up in the summer of 2016.

post-2050-086075000 1307457668 (1).jpg

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palmsOrl

This was what I determined to be the Cyrtostachys "Hybrid", purchased in 2009 as "Cyrtostachys elegans".  I had it until 2016 when I had to relocate and by then it was fairly large and in the ground.

1DF84993-0E5F-4F78-BF87-EBE4145E0EEC.png.698c70224d72fe02af00ad99fcec490e.png

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sandgroper
7 minutes ago, palmsOrl said:

Here is a photo of my Cyrtostachys renda from February 2011 at my parent's former house.  I had this palm from 2003-2016 and grew it from a 1' size to a large palm.  It became unweildy and I planted in the ground in my greenhouse and it burnt up in the summer of 2016.

post-2050-086075000 1307457668 (1).jpg

These really are the most stunning looking palms. 

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Kim

Basic C. renda

The taller palms in the first photo were planted from 7-gal pots in March 2010.  The palms in the foreground of the 2nd photo were from 1-gal pots planted December 2012. Photos are from March 2018.

1042792180_032018IMG_5615.thumb.jpg.30fb228c7cdcc44c94d21903c78808fe.jpg

2114083115_032018IMG_5621.thumb.jpg.75ab9bd268b9f7b7c34a700311b1fc63.jpg

 

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waykoolplantz

Spectacular display Kim

group planting at its best

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palmsOrl

I have read of a Cyrtostachys renda selection called "Ruby" that has deep ruby red coloration being grown in Thailand I believe.  I would love to procure this one but I have no idea if it exists in the US.

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Kim
9 hours ago, waykoolplantz said:

Spectacular display Kim

group planting at its best

Thanks! They have at last grown into the vision I had at the time of planting.

2010:

DSC_0087.thumb.jpg.2afd78a2cad22f8dabfd698197f1e00f.jpg

2012:

462088384_102012DSC_0062.thumb.jpg.57ce411621ecf80446721515eca2673e.jpg

 

 

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waykoolplantz

Kim..you dramatically show why we need to be pro-active with the Palm society 

younger people show little patience...but the rewards as you show here are worth it.

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palmsOrl

Well said waykoolplantz!  Please update us on your Cyrtostachys.  You have an amazing garden.

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Jeff Searle

As a lot of you know, Cyrtostachys is one of my favorite genus of palms. And I love my Hybrids. Currently 12 planted in the yard. But I just recently added C. bakeri to the group and very hopeful this will be one that I can add to the garden someday. Currently my C. elegans is about 12-15' tall now and has done fantastic for me. I just recently potted up my largest Apple form into a big cement pot on my patio and will watch it this winter. Fingers crossed....

Great topic BTW.....

Jeff

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Really full garden

This is the largest of six I have growing in my beach garden. It has a more orange than red coloring. It’s about 14 feet tall and was planted as a small one gallon sized plant 17 years ago.

These need a lot of care to get established.

After about five years the roots tap into the permanently moist zone about 12 feet down and they really take off. 
This palm gets 100% full tropical beach sun. For many years I selectively pruned out the suckers to make the colored trunks more prominent. This year I have let the suckers grow .

EC265740-8212-4D35-A61E-684C7B698846.thumb.jpeg.1a22d3d6c91cb4467812c0da77ca38d7.jpeg

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Kaname-kun

Two small variegated and a larger regular C. renda that has been outdoors for three Fort Lauderdale winters so far . . . .IMG_3666.thumb.jpeg.48d157724c42ab94d823e484ef9af776.jpeg

IMG_3667 copy.jpg

IMG_3669 copy.jpg

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palmsOrl

My C. renda "Apple" has been slowly putting on new growth since I acquired it in early October.  I decided to go ahead and setup the terrarium for it inside to keep in growing through our "winter" so I can get some size on it.  Hopefully this set up will keep the temperatures between 68F and 85F and keep it growing.  I need to get better lighting for it, but I am hoping that being located near the window will give it some afternoon sunlight to supplement the lights I have.  The terrarium should stay very humid and I am hoping the holes drilled in the container will provide just enough air movement to avoid issues with mold.

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palmsOrl

I stumbled upon a Thai website with information that has potentially credible information on the parentage of one of the special Cyrtostachys variants in cultivation, Cyrtostachys "Apple".  According to the following site, https://www.baanlaesuan.com/plants/palm-cycad/137951.html (view in English if needed), Cyrtostachys "Apple" or "Apple Palm" is a hybrid of the species Cyrtostachys renda and Cyrtostachys elegans.

Indeed, one familiar with the appearance of both C. renda and C. glauca can clearly see both parents when looking at the mature Cyrtostachys "Apple" specimen in the photo.  Admittedly though, the same observation could be made of the Cyrtostachys known as "Cyrtostachys Hybrid" when comparing it to Cyrtostachys renda and Cyrtostachys elegans.

Personally, when it comes to these relatively new Cyrtostachys variants/cultivars/hybrids, I suspect Cyrtostachys glauca and maybe even Cyrtostachys loriae parentage exists in the mix with some of them.  Further, I wouldn't be surprised if complex parentage of three (or possibly more) species or hybrids of hybrids and an additional species or hybrids between two or more hybrids exist, which may account for the existence of palms such as C. "Apple", C. Hybrid, C. Theodora Buhler and perhaps others.

apple-palm.jpg

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PalmatierMeg

A terrarium is a good idea. I had no luck keeping alive any Cyrtostachys smaller than 3g.

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palmsOrl

Happy Thanksgiving Meg and all other US Palmtalkers.  

I agree that a terrarium is really the only way to go for such a temperature and humidity sensitive species at such a small size during less than optimal outside conditions.  Even in the summer, I would worry about sudden thunderstorm winds or critters.  I have no doubt that my seedling would already be in decline if left outside in an inch standing of water over the past month, with just the chilly weather we have had.

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palmsOrl

I added a heat lamp a couple weeks ago to the setup so that I could get temperatures up into the 80s, and this has really caused the emerging leaf spear to move at more than a snail's pace.

20191208_160248.jpg

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colin Peters

IMG_4373.thumb.jpg.64a0d0dc5de7800ff3a51fe5ef697e03.jpgIMG_4372.thumb.jpg.2f8962c9050f4a929793de0b0c062483.jpgIMG_4378.thumb.jpg.03c8fe39082912be78b4e8c0f9c31220.jpg

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colin Peters

been in ground 7yrs from 15gallon. Clean them up when clients come to town. Why would you plant Dypsis lutecens when you could have these. These are 3 of 9 planted out

 

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palmsOrl

Here is a mid-winter update of my Cyrtostachys "Apple".  I just pour water into one of the top holes with a funnel every week and the heat lamp and lights do the rest.  It has put on some good growth in recent months, probably partly due to the Dynamite brand fertilizer I applied.

20200119_141747.jpg

20200119_141820.jpg

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realarch

Michael, you certainly get an ‘ A ‘ for effort! Spring and summer are on the way.

Tim

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JANAIY

Mine has doubled  the size in less than a year . I believe to be a very easy palm to grow here in Miami Beach, at least until you can protect the palm from those sparingly cold nights. Mine comes inside as soon the temperature goes under 58F .
Lots of water, the more the better and misting when the weather is dry and always in the shade. 

today
 

B5643D6D-45A0-453A-8FF1-0D93CB677820.thumb.jpeg.93a1db7f3e171d74e5557f04035fd08a.jpeg
 

Feb 2019
IMG_2596.thumb.jpg.9debeb62d9627ea8e34e6d8989d01742.jpg

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JANAIY
On 10/19/2019 at 1:37 PM, Kaname-kun said:

Two small variegated and a larger regular C. renda that has been outdoors for three Fort Lauderdale winters so far . . . .IMG_3666.thumb.jpeg.48d157724c42ab94d823e484ef9af776.jpeg

IMG_3667 copy.jpg

IMG_3669 copy.jpg

yours are beautifully red stems, mine looks more like orange and not sure they will ever get as red as yours when it gets bigger. I guess it depends where they come from or they have to get in a certain age to get full red?  Do you remember where you got yours from?

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JANAIY
On 10/13/2019 at 12:33 AM, Kim said:

Basic C. renda

The taller palms in the first photo were planted from 7-gal pots in March 2010.  The palms in the foreground of the 2nd photo were from 1-gal pots planted December 2012. Photos are from March 2018.

1042792180_032018IMG_5615.thumb.jpg.30fb228c7cdcc44c94d21903c78808fe.jpg

2114083115_032018IMG_5621.thumb.jpg.75ab9bd268b9f7b7c34a700311b1fc63.jpg

 

really stunning garden Kim. I am trying to find some more of them but really looking to get those nice red and thick stems like yours. Where did you get them from?

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greysrigging

A common species in cultivation in Darwin.... but ( there's always a but ) they are thirsty....need supplemental watering in our 'dry season'
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Hilo Jason

Saw these nice ones at the university of Hawaii Hilo campus:

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E1862402-C4BC-4612-AEBB-85ACAFBCD1ED.thumb.jpeg.00e9531ad34ee675c4b65af8d495f5ef.jpeg

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Kaname-kun
10 hours ago, JANAIY said:

yours are beautifully red stems, mine looks more like orange and not sure they will ever get as red as yours when it gets bigger. I guess it depends where they come from or they have to get in a certain age to get full red?  Do you remember where you got yours from?

Jesse Durko in Davie. 

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JANAIY
29 minutes ago, Kaname-kun said:

Jesse Durko in Davie. 

:D

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Kim
On 1/22/2020 at 11:38 PM, JANAIY said:

really stunning garden Kim. I am trying to find some more of them but really looking to get those nice red and thick stems like yours. Where did you get them from?

Thank you Janaiy. These were sourced locally on the Big Island of Hawaii. Unfortunately, the first source closed due to inundation by lava. A second source, a backyard nursery, terminated business years ago. And the third, where I bought 2 plants to replace 1 that didn't make it, I'm unsure, as it was also a backyard nursery, no shipping. I buy them where I find them locally at good prices. These were all either small or tiny at the time of acquisition, but color was good, and they have grown well. We get rain 12 months a year, and no cold spells, both key factors. Fertilizer also helps. Good luck with your search!

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JANAIY
11 hours ago, Kim said:

Thank you Janaiy. These were sourced locally on the Big Island of Hawaii. Unfortunately, the first source closed due to inundation by lava. A second source, a backyard nursery, terminated business years ago. And the third, where I bought 2 plants to replace 1 that didn't make it, I'm unsure, as it was also a backyard nursery, no shipping. I buy them where I find them locally at good prices. These were all either small or tiny at the time of acquisition, but color was good, and they have grown well. We get rain 12 months a year, and no cold spells, both key factors. Fertilizer also helps. Good luck with your search!

Thanks for your info Kim.

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PatientPalms

Newly planted lipsticks at the front gate to the farm; can you see the snow in the background on Mauna Kea?! 

EBD0E49F-1FED-4578-854F-E54D8C56CED0.jpeg

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JANAIY
1 hour ago, PersistentPalms said:

Newly planted lipsticks at the front gate to the farm; can you see the snow in the background on Mauna Kea?! 

EBD0E49F-1FED-4578-854F-E54D8C56CED0.jpeg

WoW, that’s pretty cool picture and interesting 

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JohnLight

Looks like I lost a seedling during the few South Florida cold snaps we have had this year. I have 4 others with only 2 showing cold damage. I have two others in 3g that don’t show any damage. The only thing is they are sooooooooo slow!!!

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Mangosteen

red sealing.jpg

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Kaname-kun

New planting. I removed several Rhapis, a dying Robellini, and an overgrown Artabotrys hexapetalus and replaced with Cyrtostachys. Here's hoping! South-facing, against brick wall of house, and surrounded by pavers . . . may they all contribute to radiating heat. But it hasn't been below 40 degrees here since 2010, so I'm optimistic. 

IMG_3791.jpg

IMG_3835.jpg

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