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SEVA

The early signs of autumn are here.  A few trees are showing some fall color (or maybe it's drought-induced), but most are still green here.  These are a few photos from southeast VA that either show fall colors or at least remind me of fall.  

Please share photos that you associate with fall.  Could be anything such as fall foliage, this season's harvest, etc.  It'd be interesting to see some fall foliage with palms as well (once the leaves change).  We don't really have the best fall colors here, but I'll try to post some photos of my palms once the nearby deciduous trees begin to change.

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Poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans)

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Sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum): the sun was hitting it just right

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SEVA

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Common persimmon (Diospyros virginiana): not ripe yet, but getting closer. Have to wait for a freeze of course before it's ready to consume.

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Fig (Ficus carica): not just a fall producer, but I think of them since they typically produce fruit until the first freeze.

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SEVA

The cotton bolls are open now.

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SEVA

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Sabal minor infructescence

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Baccharis halimifolia

 

Edited by SEVA
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SEVA

And of course, always have to watch out for these.

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Silas_Sancona

No fall colors here, but signs of change at the house. Of the 6 Bursera sp I have, 2 drop all their leaves each fall / winter. One, bought as B. laxiflora ( likely a cross of some sort ) leafs out later than the rest ( mid June here ) and is already turning yellow and dropping it's leaves ( does the same thing each year ) Already seeing a few leave on B. silver starting to turn atm. This sp. will turn gold / orange-ish in another couple weeks. B. fageroides can color up too when going dormant for the year, but leaves usually turn brown before dropping for me here.   The rest hold onto most / all their leaves thru our winter.

Other stuff I have that can / does throw around fall color here includes Buttercup Tree, Cochlospermum vitifolium,  Erythrina flabelliformis, and Caesalpinia platyloba though my largest specimen seems to hang on to most of its foliage thru winter before turning shades of red, orange, and purplish maroon near the start of spring. 

One would never think it but Tropical Deciduous Forests in Sonora present as close to a " classic fall foliage "season" as you can get in the sub tropics. There are " fall season " pictures from the Alamos region ( in Sonora, Mex. ) on the AZ / Sonora Desert Museum's research section that could be mistaken for somewhere in the Northeastern U.S. or up in the Rockies..  

As far as traditional fall color?  A few areas up by Flagstaff are starting to turn, but likely won't near peak color until the end of the month, couple weeks later than normal. Most other areas of the state where you can see the trees change are also expected to peak later than normal this year also. 

Here in the Valley, if you're lucky ( and it gets cool enough, long enough ) Chinese Pistache are the only things that will present any color. Most years, they barely change, before pushing new growth.

Back in San Jose, same sp. of tree used to turn many streets in my old neighborhood bright Scarlet, Orange, Yellow, Purplish Brown, and Maroon.  Liquidamber ( Sweetgum ) and Ginko are also still seen there and color up nicely also in the fall / early winter.

Will add that this is the time of year both my Marlberry ( Ardisia escalloides) and Saffron Plum ( Sideroxylon celestranum ) start getting ready to flower. Not sure whay but both flower in winter here..  new growth is already showing signs of flower buds atm on the Marlberry.  Great plant. 

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kinzyjr

Air gets drier, grass gets browner, and every coffee shop has pumpkin spice <fill in the blank> :)

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SEVA
48 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

No fall colors here, but signs of change at the house. Of the 6 Bursera sp I have, 2 drop all their leaves each fall / winter. One, bought as B. laxiflora ( likely a cross of some sort ) leafs out later than the rest ( mid June here ) and is already turning yellow and dropping it's leaves ( does the same thing each year ) Already seeing a few leave on B. silver starting to turn atm. This sp. will turn gold / orange-ish in another couple weeks. B. fageroides can color up too when going dormant for the year, but leaves usually turn brown before dropping for me here.   The rest hold onto most / all their leaves thru our winter.

Other stuff I have that can / does throw around fall color here includes Buttercup Tree, Cochlospermum vitifolium,  Erythrina flabelliformis, and Caesalpinia platyloba though my largest specimen seems to hang on to most of its foliage thru winter before turning shades of red, orange, and purplish maroon near the start of spring. 

One would never think it but Tropical Deciduous Forests in Sonora present as close to a " classic fall foliage "season" as you can get in the sub tropics. There are " fall season " pictures from the Alamos region ( in Sonora, Mex. ) on the AZ / Sonora Desert Museum's research section that could be mistaken for somewhere in the Northeastern U.S. or up in the Rockies..  

As far as traditional fall color?  A few areas up by Flagstaff are starting to turn, but likely won't near peak color until the end of the month, couple weeks later than normal. Most other areas of the state where you can see the trees change are also expected to peak later than normal this year also. 

Here in the Valley, if you're lucky ( and it gets cool enough, long enough ) Chinese Pistache are the only things that will present any color. Most years, they barely change, before pushing new growth.

Back in San Jose, same sp. of tree used to turn many streets in my old neighborhood bright Scarlet, Orange, Yellow, Purplish Brown, and Maroon.  Liquidamber ( Sweetgum ) and Ginko are also still seen there and color up nicely also in the fall / early winter.

Will add that this is the time of year both my Marlberry ( Ardisia escalloides) and Saffron Plum ( Sideroxylon celestranum ) start getting ready to flower. Not sure whay but both flower in winter here..  new growth is already showing signs of flower buds atm on the Marlberry.  Great plant. 

I'll have to research most of those, since I'm not familiar. Lol. We certainly don't get the vibrant colors like one sees in the Northeast. Unfortunately, I've never had the chance to take a drive north to see them.  The mountains can have nice colors, but probably not this year due to the drought.  It's so dry, burn bans are in effect for several counties.

Other than the baccharis in one of the photos above, we have a few other fall/early winter-blooming shrubs that are pretty common across the South.  The buds on my camellias are beginning to swell, and will likely be blooming in about a month or so.  And do palms count? Lol.  My Butias are still blooming and keep pushing up new spathes. And oddly, one of my needle palms and a Sabal minor are showing signs of blooming soon.  And I know what you mean about Ginkgo biloba; the color on those are fantastic in the fall.  I have a few seedlings that will be ready to put in the ground once they go dormant.

Also, I've read that the leaves of Illicium parviflorum 'Florida sunshine' is supposed to turn gold/yellow in winter.  I planted one in shade that never turned, but I think it needs full sun.  I just planted another in full sun that I recently purchased from a local big big store.  Hopefully, this one turns yellow this winter.

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SEVA

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Strawberry bush or hearts-a-bustin' (Euonymus americanus)

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And of course acorns.  It's always interesting to walk around and see the different acorns.  These are southern live oak (Quercus virginiana) acorns.

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Silas_Sancona
55 minutes ago, kinzyjr said:

Air gets drier, grass gets browner, and every coffee shop has pumpkin spice <fill in the blank>:)

Funny you mention grass, evil Bermuda I have here doesn't brown out / die off for the year until.. mid winter.  Most other places nearby have already started scalping / prepping for spreading Winter Rye. 

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Silas_Sancona
56 minutes ago, SEVA said:

I'll have to research most of those, since I'm not familiar. Lol. We certainly don't get the vibrant colors like one sees in the Northeast. Unfortunately, I've never had the chance to take a drive north to see them.  The mountains can have nice colors, but probably not this year due to the drought.  It's so dry, burn bans are in effect for several counties.

Other than the baccharis in one of the photos above, we have a few other fall/early winter-blooming shrubs that are pretty common across the South.  The buds on my camellias are beginning to swell, and will likely be blooming in about a month or so.  And do palms count? Lol.  My Butias are still blooming and keep pushing up new spathes. And oddly, one of my needle palms and a Sabal minor are showing signs of blooming soon.  And I know what you mean about Ginkgo biloba; the color on those are fantastic in the fall.  I have a few seedlings that will be ready to put in the ground once they go dormant.

Also, I've read that the leaves of Illicium parviflorum 'Florida sunshine' is supposed to turn gold/yellow in winter.  I planted one in shade that never turned, but I think it needs full sun.  I just planted another in full sun that I recently purchased from a local big big store.  Hopefully, this one turns yellow this winter.

Yea, will be interesting how this summers drought effects the trees up on the rim, mountains in the east / southeast parts of the state. Had we not had any rain last week, there were 2 active fires that could have spread more than they did. Fire season here usually ends once the Monsoon season sets in in July. Not this year.. Had fires all summer. 

Out of all the plants I listed ( most I have discussed at various times here ) the Erythrina would be the most trial-able able there. Hangs out in some of the colder canyons in the southeastern part of the state ( 8a-9a ) down there. Others, you'd have to bring in during the winter.  Neat stuff regardless.  Almost Camelia season back in CA also.. or, when we'd start stocking tons of them.  ..And yes, lol Palms count. Can't remember which Sabal ( possibly mauritiiformis ) seed was ripe around Thanksgiving back in Florida. 

Tried the Yellow flowered Fl native Anise but lost it for some reason. Really wanted the red flowered one.  Might try again.. that and another sp. from northeastern Mexico when back in CA. if I can get a hold of either. Also want to trial Magnolia macrophylla and ashi out there, just to see how either perform in a favorable spot.  If you like them, there's a Clethera sp. from Mexico Woodlanders Nursery sells ( Clethera pringlei ) Seems odd but apparently numerous things from northeastern Mexico seem to tolerate a lot of cold and have been trailed ( several apparently successfully ) in the south east, in colder parts of central Texas, and the Pac. Northwest.  There's even a native Podocarpus sp, Maples and Liquidamber in the forests down there, ..covered with Orchids and various Bromeliads..  interesting combo of plants. 

I'm sure you know this already,  if your Ginko seedlings turn out to be both male and female, get rid of the females ( or males ), unless you have the space to plant both away from anywhere anyone will be able to smell the fruit..  Cant think of anything else that smells worse than those fruit, lol. 

 

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SEVA
11 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Yea, will be interesting how this summers drought effects the trees up on the rim, mountains in the east / southeast parts of the state. Had we not had any rain last week, there were 2 active fires that could have spread more than they did. Fire season here usually ends once the Monsoon season sets in in July. Not this year.. Had fires all summer. 

Out of all the plants I listed ( most I have discussed at various times here ) the Erythrina would be the most trial-able able there. Hangs out in some of the colder canyons in the southeastern part of the state ( 8a-9a ) down there. Others, you'd have to bring in during the winter.  Neat stuff regardless.  Almost Camelia season back in CA also.. or, when we'd start stocking tons of them.  ..And yes, lol Palms count. Can't remember which Sabal ( possibly mauritiiformis ) seed was ripe around Thanksgiving back in Florida. 

Tried the Yellow flowered Fl native Anise but lost it for some reason. Really wanted the red flowered one.  Might try again.. that and another sp. from northeastern Mexico when back in CA. if I can get a hold of either. Also want to trial Magnolia macrophylla and ashi out there, just to see how either perform in a favorable spot.  If you like them, there's a Clethera sp. from Mexico Woodlanders Nursery sells ( Clethera pringlei ) Seems odd but apparently numerous things from northeastern Mexico seem to tolerate a lot of cold and have been trailed ( several apparently successfully ) in the south east, in colder parts of central Texas, and the Pac. Northwest.  There's even a native Podocarpus sp, Maples and Liquidamber in the forests down there, ..covered with Orchids and various Bromeliads..  interesting combo of plants. 

I'm sure you know this already,  if your Ginko seedlings turn out to be both male and female, get rid of the females ( or males ), unless you have the space to plant both away from anywhere anyone will be able to smell the fruit..  Cant think of anything else that smells worse than those fruit, lol. 

 

Hopefully we get some rain soon.  I don't want a repeat of 2011 when the dismal swamp caught fire.  It burned for months and the smoke was so thick it frequently blocked out the sun.  Even had ash falling in the yard.

The only Sabals I have that are of flowering/fruiting size are Sabal minor, and their fruits are ripening now.  I've just never seen them produce an inflorescence this time of year.  It's starting to send up an inflorescence as the infructescence is ripening.

Here is the Illicium parviflorum 'Florida sunshine' that I recently planted.

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Did you have early high temperatures when you lost the Illicium?  I have a young Illicium floridanum that lost it's new leaves back in May during a 100F degree heat wave.  It still doesn't look great, but I'm hoping it'll do better next year.  The photo below is of one in Norfolk that I saw this past August.  Since the one in Norfolk is doing so well, I wonder if it didn't get as hot since it's closer to the bay.

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I do grow Clethras. I have our native Clethra alnifolia growing wild near the swamp and the pink-flowering Clethra alnifolia.

Are you referring to sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua)?  That's native here too and I actually try to remove it.  It pops up everywhere and can quickly take over an area if you let it.  Also, I'm hoping for both male and female ginkgo trees.  The smell isn't great, but I can tolerate it.

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Silas_Sancona

 

8 minutes ago, SEVA said:

Did you have early high temperatures when you lost the Illicium?  I have a young Illicium floridanum that lost it's new leaves back in May during a 100F degree heat wave.  It still doesn't look great, but I'm hoping it'll do better next year.  The photo below is of one in Norfolk that I saw this past August.  Since the one in Norfolk is doing so well, I wonder if it didn't get as hot since it's closer to the bay.

 

I do grow Clethras. I have our native Clethra alnifolia growing wild near the swamp and the pink-flowering Clethra alnifolia.

Are you referring to sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua)?  That's native here too and I actually try to remove it.  It pops up everywhere and can quickly take over an area if you let it.  Also, I'm hoping for both male and female ginkgo trees.  The smell isn't great, but I can tolerate it.

Not really,  was still in Florida when I purchased it and kept it on the east facing side of our front porch so it was sheltered from afternoon sun..  looked great for awhile, then dropped most of its foliage and died.  Weird since I don't remember Illicium being particularly sensitive..  Probably something I did. It happens, lol. 

Yes, same sp. of Liquidamber ( Sweetgum ) native to the U.S.  also grows in Mexico, and down to Guatemala as well.   Was planted extensively  in the Bay Area ( San Jose in  particular ) back in the 50s- early 70s? ..I think,  anyway,  rarely find any seedlings but the fruit themselves could be a nightmare.  Specimens in my old neighborhood have been slowly succumbing to drought, increased heat, and whatever pests they have a harder time fending off now. On the other hand, there are Sweetgum planted in another neighborhood near by that easily exceed 35ft in height and still look healthy. Only obvious difference between locations is the healthier trees have much more room to grow between the sidewalk / street as homes there have wider lots. Soil profile might be better there also because that area of town was part of an extensive plum / prune orchard ( often referred to as the Prune Yard by anyone living in that part of San Jose long enough ).  Regardless of location, they color up nicely in the fall most years.  

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SEVA
5 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

 

Not really,  was still in Florida when I purchased it and kept it on the east facing side of our front porch so it was sheltered from afternoon sun..  looked great for awhile, then dropped most of its foliage and died.  Weird since I don't remember Illicium being particularly sensitive..  Probably something I did. It happens, lol. 

Yes, same sp. of Liquidamber ( Sweetgum ) native to the U.S.  also grows in Mexico, and down to Guatemala as well.   Was planted extensively  in the Bay Area ( San Jose in  particular ) back in the 50s- early 70s? ..I think,  anyway,  rarely find any seedlings but the fruit themselves could be a nightmare.  Specimens in my old neighborhood have been slowly succumbing to drought, increased heat, and whatever pests they have a harder time fending off now. On the other hand, there are Sweetgum planted in another neighborhood near by that easily exceed 35ft in height and still look healthy. Only obvious difference between locations is the healthier trees have much more room to grow between the sidewalk / street as homes there have wider lots. Soil profile might be better there also because that area of town was part of an extensive plum / prune orchard ( often referred to as the Prune Yard by anyone living in that part of San Jose long enough ).  Regardless of location, they color up nicely in the fall most years.  

The fruits, which we call gumballs, aren't fun to step on that's for sure.  Yeah, they can have nice colors such as yellow, red, and purple.  The sap and crushed leaves have a nice aroma.  Even still, I'd probably only plant one if I happened to find one that was variegated or something.  I actually saw a sweetgum planted in Raleigh that had rounded leaves and didn't produce many gumballs.  That could be a nice one to have.

And I'm thinking that sourwood I posted earlier is suffering from water stress.  They're still green on the wetter sites like the one in the photo below.  I'll try to post photos once the actual fall colors arrive.  The peak color here is usually late October/ early November.

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SEVA

Took some better pics of the cotton this morning here in Suffolk, VA.  It's a bit more noticeable.

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SEVA

More cotton behind a row of loblolly pines.  Not too many gravel/dirt roads left around here.

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NOT A TA

Here in S FL it's Avacado and Sugar apple Annona squamosa season. 

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Ryagra

Hints of autumn beginning along the Virgin River. Autumn brings winds and clouds, also. 

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SEVA

Lagerstroemia indica and Sabal minor.  The tree with the most fall foliage so far (in my yard).

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SEVA

The camellias are beginning to bloom. The flowers on this one have a divine fragrance. And the Butias just continue to push out inflorescences.

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PalmTreeDude

My bananas trees, needle palm, and one of my Sabal minor seedlings covered in maple leaves. 

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SEVA

American beautyberry (Callicarpa americana)

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SEVA

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Silas_Sancona

Pretty much the only real standout I have that colors up in the fall.

Other Bursera and Jatropha sp. which also present color this time of year are still a bit too small to really put on any kind of show atm. 

Camera died recently, so I'm stuck with using the tablets cam.. and the softer than I'd like picture quality.  Will call these, and other pics I'll take " The soft/ fuzzy pictures edition". Lol

Bursera silviae,  native to Oaxaca, Mexico.  Might be one of the largest potted specimens locally.  Have had it since 2013. Purchased as a 4 inch.

Taken about a week ago.

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Taken this morning.

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foliage detail..

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SEVA

Loquats are beginning to bloom.  These aren't in my yard, but I have a few seedlings that I plan to plant out next spring.

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SEVA

I've seen bananas bloom this time of year, but this was nice to see.

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SEVA

The red maple is finally changing. Nice color this year too. I'm quite surprised.

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