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Ivorhooper

Northerly Palms

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Ivorhooper

Living in the UK, it amazes me how much influence the jet stream has on our climate.

It's relatively mild all year round - no real hot summers or freezing cold winters. Parts of the south west hardly see any frost, so quite tropical plants can thrive (as long as they don't need serious heat)

Here's some palms I've spotted on my travelsIMG_20190911_151124.thumb.jpg.185a78a128b1fd995cab24cdc29e1eb8.jpg

CIDP @ 50 degrees north in Cornwall

 

IMG_20190911_165229.thumb.jpg.28bcf4d3c856999bada7332ab418fb88.jpg

Butia @ 50 degrees north in CornwallIMG_20190516_162003.thumb.jpg.0a56b9981541407a50e4e063a3251bad.jpg

CIDP @  53 degrees north in Wales

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Ivorhooper

IMG_20180802_130730.thumb.jpg.af727b8cd5233ad31f5e3e30d62303f1.jpg

Mature cordyline @ 56.2 degrees north. West Scotland.IMG_20171125_124556.thumb.jpg.c89b85348f1b332b4281ce80cdd79810.jpg

CIDP @ 54.2 degrees north. Yorkshire

 

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The Silent Seed

I love that first CIDP! Thank you for sharing all of them! 

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Rickybobby

Love it !

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Ivorhooper

Problem for us here is that palms labelled as the hardiest - sabals for example, don't get the heat that they need to grow well and so growth is painfully slow.

One leaf a year tops, so if you lose leaves, it's very slow to replace them. The palm sometimes can't recover and dies. Haven't seen any big sabals in the UK.

 

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oasis371

Yeah, well, we might as well be living on a different planet.  Our seasons are extreme here in the eastern US and if anything, seem to be getting more extreme. 

Summers in urban areas are long, HOT and very HUMID (and worse actually than areas further south into the tropics).  Summer rainfall has become more erratic with flooding alternating with flash droughts (we are currently in drought and continued summer heat).

But, some recent winters have brought record snows. In general, Winters are shorter but freakish, polar vortices are enough to kill even the hardiest palms.  Everything is more unpredictable than it used to be.  Maybe we will one day be more hospitable to palms, but it's still risky as of now.

I have to protect most of my palms despite the high, overall, annual heat values.  I do have yet another Trachycarpus in my front yard..., have lost others.  Sabal minors are the only ones that can be called reliable in an Eastern zone 7A/B climate., I particularly like Sabal Louisiana as it grows faster than minors. (My favorite Sabal though is Sabal bermudana, but still to cold for it.) I have tried Needles, but they don't seem very robust and am not crazy about them at this point. 

Edited by oasis371

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petiole10

Lovely pics.   CIDP,  Butia , and Washingtonia  and Mexican blue Hesper palms grow well alongside the familiar and commonly known Trachycarpus in my location close to the SE coast of the UK.  Some winters have barely seem a frost till beyond Christmas and into January. It would be ideal if this could be better guaranteed though!

This is the warmest part of the UK in summer closest to the European mainland continent and the two most recent summers with record breaking heat would have definitely favored Sabals, but even though summers here are definitely getting hotter year on year against the long term climate trend, there are still enough cloudy and wet periods to pose difficulties. Its no coincidence that my own Washingtonia and Hesper palms, which also love the heat and sun, have thrived especially well these summers and set them up for the shorter days, falling temperatures and the surfeit of rain they are less than impressed with.

I'm surprised that more Jubaea are not grown in the UK , though they are slowly becoming better known - they are quite able to deal with the climate type here and are fantastic looking palms.

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