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Palmsofengland

London’s palmy potential

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Tyrone
7 hours ago, Texyn said:

As a certified meteorologist, I can tell that what I said before is factual. You people continue to make the typical mistakes of amateur climatologists. You swallow the data hook, line and sinker, without even considering the lurking variables. Real climatologists would laugh at the cockamamie theories you people cook up on this forum. Let me provide some interesting factoids about the Italian South:

-The Italian South is the most poleward region of the world where healthy coconut palms can be grown outdoors, especially in Lampedusa, Malta and Pachino.

-The Italian South has the ability to support many tropical animals such as monkeys, lions, hyenas, crocodiles, gazelles, parrots, anhingas, and flamingos.

-Mangrove swamps line the entire Sicilian coast, and the Tyrrhenian coast up to even Campania.

-The Italian South is one of very few subtropical regions in the world to contain a full-fledged tropical climate outside of the tropics.

These feats are such that many other subtropical regions wish they could accomplish. But the Italian South accomplishes them effortlessly.

 

It seems that what you don’t like are actual facts.

Anyway. Each to his own. 

I suggest you go and plant a heap of Cyrtostachys renda and Verschafeltia splendida and enjoy your tropical paradise.

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tim_brissy_13
19 minutes ago, Tyrone said:

It seems that what you don’t like are actual facts.

Anyway. Each to his own. 

I suggest you go and plant a heap of Cyrtostachys renda and Verschafeltia splendida and enjoy your tropical paradise.

The Italian South must also be an ideal climate for growing a range of special crops which our mate may have indulged in. 
 

I must admit this thread has been an entertaining read. 

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GottmitAlex

Bet it's full of Adonidia's, C. renda and Euterpe oleracea as far as the eye can see. 

After this pandemic, I'm booking a flight to the "deep, deep south of Italy".

Probably forgot another "deep" in my previous quote.

Can't wait.

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Silas_Sancona
10 minutes ago, GottmitAlex said:

Bet it's full of Adonidia's, C. renda and Euterpe oleracea as far as the eye can see. 

After this pandemic, I'm booking a flight to the "deep, deep south of Italy".

Probably forgot another "deep" in my previous quote.

Can't wait.

Don't forget to get plenty of pictures of the Native Hyenas, Lions, and endless, Crocodile- filled Mangrove forests you encounter.. Lemonade should be extra refreshing, :lol:

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Texyn
9 hours ago, tim_brissy_13 said:

The Italian South must also be an ideal climate for growing a range of special crops which our mate may have indulged in. 
 

I must admit this thread has been an entertaining read. 

Its great that you are laughing; laughter is good for the heart and soul, and helps to ease the tension from the day. As much as you people are laughing, I'm laughing as well. Do you know what is especially funny though? The inability for you posters to grasp the simple concepts being put forth to you.

Unlike what many of you posters purport to be, real climatologists don't sit around swallowing the data blindly hook, line, and sinker, making false, inaccurate judgments from it; they actually think for themselves, and consider all the possible outside parameters that could have an effect on the implications of such data. As a result, you will never hear any reputable climatologist going around spouting the fable that the Italian South sees the coldest extremes in winter of any subtropical region. Yep, the real players in the field see that claim for the bs it is, so the fact that you amateurs on this forum are stating such things as if they were facts is quite laughable.

All it takes is simple ecological observation to debunk the sophomoric claim of the Italian South's supposed extremes in drought compared to other subtropical climates; in the Italian South, you see thick, undisturbed, evergreen subtropical forest, not too dissimilar to what is seen in subtropical India, as well as the US South. The native vegetation in the ecosystems of the Italian South have practically the same hardiness as the native vegetation of the Subtropical Australia, and India, and are way more tender than the native plants growing in oceanic climates that are supposedly less prone to cold, such as Northwest Europe such as Brest in France. That fact therefore proves that the potential for cold of a certain magnitude in the Italian South is precisely the same as similar latitudes in Southern Japan, and India, and that those oceanic west coast climates I named have a greater potential for cold than the Italian South. Those areas only seem less prone to cold, but that is only because they were lucky enough to escape the cold epoch that plagues Italy. When those areas see cold epochs, I guarantee you that they will approach magnitudes of cold way worse than what was ever seen in the Italian South.

Such extrapolations are what all real climatologists do when judging the climate of a place.

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sandgroper
43 minutes ago, Texyn said:



Such extrapolations are what all real climatologists do when judging the climate of a place.

Do all real climatologists also post pictures of Kentias and pheonix palms and say they're coconuts or is that something unique to you?

 

 

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greysrigging
50 minutes ago, Texyn said:


 in the Italian South, you see thick, undisturbed, evergreen subtropical forest, not too dissimilar to what is seen in subtropical India, as well as the US South. The native vegetation in the ecosystems of the Italian South have practically the same hardiness as the native vegetation of the Subtropical Australia, and India,

 

Ahh right.... got it....
So the forest that looked suspiciously like Northern Thailand was... hang on... it actually was Northern Thailand ! Outstanding ! 
From one BS artist to another....maaaate...luv ya work !
Subtropical_semi-evergreen_seasonal_forest_in_Northern_Thailand.thumb.jpg.4b0d59bcca10cafca12ba53efa29fbf6.jpg.4da8afe3336034c7086c555a5242d1d1.jpg.64af0cab012b939233d05a97b9fc2ba2.jpg
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Subtropical_semi-evergreen_seasonal_forest_in_Northern_Thailand.JPG

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UK_Palms
25 minutes ago, Texyn said:

Its great that you are laughing; laughter is good for the heart and soul, and helps to ease the tension from the day. As much as you people are laughing, I'm laughing as well. Do you know what is especially funny though? The inability for you posters to grasp the simple concepts being put forth to you.

Unlike what many of you posters purport to be, real climatologists don't sit around swallowing the data blindly hook, line, and sinker, making false, inaccurate judgments from it; they actually think for themselves, and consider all the possible outside parameters that could have an effect on the implications of such data. As a result, you will never hear any reputable climatologist going around spouting the fable that the Italian South sees the coldest extremes in winter of any subtropical region. Yep, the real players in the field see that claim for the bs it is, so the fact that you amateurs on this forum are stating such things as if they were facts is quite laughable.

All it takes is simple ecological observation to debunk the sophomoric claim of the Italian South's supposed extremes in drought compared to other subtropical climates; in the Italian South, you see thick, undisturbed, evergreen subtropical forest, not too dissimilar to what is seen in subtropical India, as well as the US South. The native vegetation in the ecosystems of the Italian South have practically the same hardiness as the native vegetation of the Subtropical Australia, and India, and are way more tender than the native plants growing in oceanic climates that are supposedly less prone to cold, such as Northwest Europe such as Brest in France. That fact therefore proves that the potential for cold of a certain magnitude in the Italian South is precisely the same as similar latitudes in Southern Japan, and India, and that those oceanic west coast climates I named have a greater potential for cold than the Italian South. Those areas only seem less prone to cold, but that is only because they were lucky enough to escape the cold epoch that plagues Italy. When those areas see cold epochs, I guarantee you that they will approach magnitudes of cold way worse than what was ever seen in the Italian South.

Such extrapolations are what all real climatologists do when judging the climate of a place.

How is all this dribble even relevant to people growing palms in London? This is the the palm growing section and your posts are neither about palm growing in general, or relevant to the topic weather-wise. 
 

You already have TWO separate threads running in the ‘weather’ section about southern Italy’s ‘tropical’ climate. Go post this crap there. 

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NorCalKing
8 hours ago, Texyn said:

Its great that you are laughing; laughter is good for the heart and soul, and helps to ease the tension from the day. As much as you people are laughing, I'm laughing as well. Do you know what is especially funny though? The inability for you posters to grasp the simple concepts being put forth to you.

Unlike what many of you posters purport to be, real climatologists don't sit around swallowing the data blindly hook, line, and sinker, making false, inaccurate judgments from it; they actually think for themselves, and consider all the possible outside parameters that could have an effect on the implications of such data. As a result, you will never hear any reputable climatologist going around spouting the fable that the Italian South sees the coldest extremes in winter of any subtropical region. Yep, the real players in the field see that claim for the bs it is, so the fact that you amateurs on this forum are stating such things as if they were facts is quite laughable.

All it takes is simple ecological observation to debunk the sophomoric claim of the Italian South's supposed extremes in drought compared to other subtropical climates; in the Italian South, you see thick, undisturbed, evergreen subtropical forest, not too dissimilar to what is seen in subtropical India, as well as the US South. The native vegetation in the ecosystems of the Italian South have practically the same hardiness as the native vegetation of the Subtropical Australia, and India, and are way more tender than the native plants growing in oceanic climates that are supposedly less prone to cold, such as Northwest Europe such as Brest in France. That fact therefore proves that the potential for cold of a certain magnitude in the Italian South is precisely the same as similar latitudes in Southern Japan, and India, and that those oceanic west coast climates I named have a greater potential for cold than the Italian South. Those areas only seem less prone to cold, but that is only because they were lucky enough to escape the cold epoch that plagues Italy. When those areas see cold epochs, I guarantee you that they will approach magnitudes of cold way worse than what was ever seen in the Italian South.

Such extrapolations are what all real climatologists do when judging the climate of a place.

Huh, you are not related to the snake oil salesman that started this thread, by chance?

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UK_Palms

Back on topic...

More CIDP's from around London...

thumbnail_image0-39.jpg.35d84dad54ca291eded61f9c3d1d8862.jpg

thumbnail_image0-38.thumb.jpg.855c89a8ebff03f5492458786a8d30d8.jpg

thumbnail_image1-36.thumb.jpg.f309f5a0fec7ea96a9116a6aa78148ef.jpg

thumbnail_image3-8.jpg.55f6d6984d98c26bfd50ef467afe5abb.jpg

1664011898_ScreenShot2020-08-02at19_47_27.thumb.jpg.350c3ebe0d7395c1077a757a75b92789.jpg

They're even planting CIDP's outside fire stations in London...

19796572_ScreenShot2020-10-01at02_40_35.thumb.jpg.a672c72a23d833e896bee959dbf6196c.jpg

Even the churches are getting kitted out with CIDP's... :lol2:

1021934165_ScreenShot2020-10-01at05_30_50.thumb.jpg.aed55514ad4fd3139974abf28a6d8655.jpg

CIDP's are being planted everywhere, in nearly every neighbourhood, and they're growing rapidly in London...

1716376380_ScreenShot2020-09-30at04_45_36.thumb.jpg.d26fe65e7e1f859ee222f79885122401.jpg

 

Don't know how I left the Burgess Park Butia off my top 25 palms list on the previous page...

EfIXIqKX0AE2dw2.jpg.c036d451e8c52e64df03eba72918ec35.jpg

And another Butia...

thumbnail_image1-37.thumb.jpg.456436aa1cdab571004998a4c61f92cf.jpg

 

Jubaea and Chamaerops in Richmond...

thumbnail_image0-40.thumb.jpg.10b432b4e988b7a13865dc7397054572.jpg

 

Another one of many Chamaerops Humilis plantings...

1259046025_ScreenShot2020-09-30at01_32_10.thumb.jpg.3bc3c3832de65eb3e8a53e2ca433953d.jpg

 

Any guesses to what this Washie is at Battersea Park...? Filibusta hybrid?

thumbnail_image1-35.thumb.jpg.8859ba393afdd54435ef421d0073d567.jpg

 

Not London, but check out these Washies on the south coast, 30 miles south of me... (could do with a trim)

thumbnail_image2-15.jpg.ca39cb1de21fcb4313c5ee71dca35885.jpg

 

 

Edited by UK_Palms
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GottmitAlex

The palms in the last 2 pics look like filiferas.

Thanks for sharing

 

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