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DAVEinMB

Palms of the Myrtle Beach Area

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DAVEinMB

Stumbled upon this guy today.  I Google mapped the house and it looks like it's been there awhile. Pure Sylvester?

 

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Mr.SamuraiSword
On 4/10/2020 at 5:32 PM, DAVEinMB said:

Stumbled upon this guy today.  I Google mapped the house and it looks like it's been there awhile. Pure Sylvester?

 

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No, looks like a mutt with CIDP.  still good find!

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Mr.SamuraiSword
1 hour ago, DAVEinMB said:

@Mr.SamuraiSword

Bah, haha. Continue to learn I shall. 

Hopefully we all continue.  Great thread and photos!

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DAVEinMB

These butia are at a nursery on hwy 544, owner says they were planted as small trees in the 80s. Ford pickup in the background for size reference

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DAVEinMB

These saw palmetto were at Caledonia Golf Course on the south end. My first time seeing any with trunks in the area. Largest one had roughly 5' of wood. 

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Edited by DAVEinMB
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Mr.SamuraiSword
7 hours ago, DAVEinMB said:

These saw palmetto were at Caledonia Golf Course on the south end. My first time seeing any with trunks in the area. Largest one had roughly 5' of wood. 

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Nice find. They are native around hilton head and a tad bit north, but certainly not that area of SC. Must have been planted a while back as they grow quite slow. 

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DAVEinMB

@Mr.SamuraiSword thanks man, I'm always on the look out for little gems like this. Their website says the course was opened in 1994, if they were part of the initial landscaping they've been in the ground for around 26 years. 

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Mr.SamuraiSword
1 hour ago, DAVEinMB said:

@Mr.SamuraiSword thanks man, I'm always on the look out for little gems like this. Their website says the course was opened in 1994, if they were part of the initial landscaping they've been in the ground for around 26 years. 

I would assume it was planted as an adult plant.  They are slow, but should be bulletproof in myrtle beach. 

Edited by Mr.SamuraiSword
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PalmTreeDude

Saw palmetto will naturalize quite easily in the Myrtle Beach area, there are even some in a few areas that naturalized around Wilmington, NC from plantings. You’ll definitely see them all around Hilton Head like Mr.SamuraiSword said. The northern most area that I’ve seen in person that had what looked to be a natural stand was in Charleston, in a few wooded areas of Mt. Pleasant, I believe they hug the coastline. Nice find! There was a restaurant that I visited frequently during trips to Myrtle Beach as a little kid that I remember had a ton of them planted. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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DAVEinMB
19 hours ago, PalmTreeDude said:

Saw palmetto will naturalize quite easily in the Myrtle Beach area, there are even some in a few areas that naturalized around Wilmington, NC from plantings. You’ll definitely see them all around Hilton Head like Mr.SamuraiSword said. The northern most area that I’ve seen in person that had what looked to be a natural stand was in Charleston, in a few wooded areas of Mt. Pleasant, I believe they hug the coastline. Nice find! There was a restaurant that I visited frequently during trips to Myrtle Beach as a little kid that I remember had a ton of them planted. 

Yea they're a super common planting here for both residential and commercial. Seems like most opt for them over sabal minor for the bush look. 

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JLM

2 queens of mine survived this past winter! Im in 8b. The third queen was planted after spring started. It has only seen upper 40s since in the ground. I dread hurricane season then winter. If anything gets torn up during hurricane season it wont have time to recover before the frost comes.

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DAVEinMB

I posted this in another thread but wanted to have it documented here as well.  Dactylifera x Sylvestris - owner says it was planted from a small bucket about 11 years ago and has never been given any winter protection. 

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Mr.SamuraiSword
On 5/20/2020 at 7:17 AM, DAVEinMB said:

Yea they're a super common planting here for both residential and commercial. Seems like most opt for them over sabal minor for the bush look. 

Cape Hatteras was the most northern area I saw them, oddly enough planted in a small neighborhood among CIDP.  seemed they were going for uncommon stuff, I saw way more CIDP on Hatteras than Saw Palmettos.

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DAVEinMB
38 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Cape Hatteras was the most northern area I saw them, oddly enough planted in a small neighborhood among CIDP.  seemed they were going for uncommon stuff, I saw way more CIDP on Hatteras than Saw Palmettos.

Just googled hatteras and wiki is saying it's zone 9. I wouldn't have guessed that but i guess it makes sense. 

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Mr.SamuraiSword
13 hours ago, DAVEinMB said:

Just googled hatteras and wiki is saying it's zone 9. I wouldn't have guessed that but i guess it makes sense. 

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Its not really zone 9, temps dipped to around 15 degrees in the 2017-2018 winter freeze and those canaries were damaged heavily.  Charleston is a true zone 9, where Canaries survived long long term. 

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RJ

This was from a recent climate study on the SE. I thought it was pretty interesting. 

 

 

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Mr.SamuraiSword
On 5/22/2020 at 6:24 AM, RJ said:

This was from a recent climate study on the SE. I thought it was pretty interesting. 

 

 

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The ancient canaries in Charelston and South must have taken frequent damage back in the day if this was accurate. 

Edited by Mr.SamuraiSword

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RJ
18 minutes ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

The ancient canaries in Charelston and South must have taken frequent damage back in the day if this was accurate. 

Why? 

 

 

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Mr.SamuraiSword
3 hours ago, RJ said:

Why? 

 

 

The old map shows Charleston as 8b. Its currently 9a and they still take damage in the bad winters like 2017-18. 

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RJ
3 hours ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

The old map shows Charleston as 8b. Its currently 9a and they still take damage in the bad winters like 2017-18. 

Charleston saw 6 in 1985.  Those palms were there then. 

 

Look at the current Map below, you can't tell Charleston is a zone 9a. zone-map-south-east-big-5692b5013df78caf

 

If anything the map I showed 1st above shows the SE to be a bit warmer then the current Zone map.  8B could be 19.9 and 9a 20.1 splitting hairs really.  If you went by the 1990 USDA zone map Charleston is considered a zone 8b, 

Edited by RJ

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Mr.SamuraiSword
20 hours ago, RJ said:

Charleston saw 6 in 1985.  Those palms were there then. 

 

Look at the current Map below, you can't tell Charleston is a zone 9a. zone-map-south-east-big-5692b5013df78caf

 

If anything the map I showed 1st above shows the SE to be a bit warmer then the current Zone map.  8B could be 19.9 and 9a 20.1 splitting hairs really.  If you went by the 1990 USDA zone map Charleston is considered a zone 8b, 

Ive seen zone maps that have Charelston as a zone 9a,  6 degrees in 85 though, I cant imagine how the washingtonia and old CIDP survived that. I am sure some did not.

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RJ
3 hours ago, Mr.SamuraiSword said:

Ive seen zone maps that have Charelston as a zone 9a,  6 degrees in 85 though, I cant imagine how the washingtonia and old CIDP survived that. I am sure some did not.

You have seen maps that show that, and most likely the first map I showed you does as well, but is zoomed out too far to tell, just like the second current USDA zone map is. Charleston is just a spec on the map along the coast and you can see it.  The color scheme from zone 8b to 9a is pretty close and Charleston is such a small blip you can tell.  That's why I noted that the original map is actually a bit warmer or at least more detailed then the current USDA zone map.  ;)

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DAVEinMB
On 5/22/2020 at 9:24 AM, RJ said:

This was from a recent climate study on the SE. I thought it was pretty interesting. 

 

 

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They're protecting half the state of sc to be trending towards 9a? Sounds good to me :D

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RJ
28 minutes ago, DAVEinMB said:

They're protecting half the state of sc to be trending towards 9a? Sounds good to me :D

For sure, I'll be pushing my 90's by then though :lol:

 

What I found interesting is that they put Columbia and the lake Murray region in zone 8b, I can say that the zoo is growing quite a few z9a plants successfully. They're quite a few long term phoenix spp around the lake and in Columbia as well. 

 

 

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DAVEinMB
2 hours ago, RJ said:

For sure, I'll be pushing my 90's by then though :lol:

 

What I found interesting is that they put Columbia and the lake Murray region in zone 8b, I can say that the zoo is growing quite a few z9a plants successfully. They're quite a few long term phoenix spp around the lake and in Columbia as well. 

 

 

Hahaha yup, by then we'll be complaining about the heat :lol:. But hey, a trend is still a trend and if we're trending towards zone 9 we should be able to expect milder winters overall moving forward. At least that's what data would suggest...

I've been meaning to get to the Columbia zoo, do you know if they're open to the public yet?

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RJ
53 minutes ago, DAVEinMB said:

Hahaha yup, by then we'll be complaining about the heat :lol:. But hey, a trend is still a trend and if we're trending towards zone 9 we should be able to expect milder winters overall moving forward. At least that's what data would suggest...

I've been meaning to get to the Columbia zoo, do you know if they're open to the public yet?

They were closed. We are members there and we got word they are doing "Timed Tickets" now. Essentially from the sounds of it you make an appointment and are allowed in during that time slot. 

Great zoo and gardens!

 

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RJ

I found the Climate report for those that are interested in reading it. This chapter is specific to the SE. As usual you need to weed through some of the global warming hysteria but there is some good historical data in here: 

 

"The Southeast region experienced high annual average temperatures in the 1920s and 1930s, followed by cooler temperatures until the 1970s. Since then, annual average temperatures have warmed to levels above the 1930s; the decade of the 2010s through 2017 has been warmer than any previous decade (App. 5: FAQs, Figure A5.14), both for average daily maximum and average daily minimum temperature. Seasonal warming has varied. The decade of the 2010s through 2017 is the warmest in all seasons for average daily minimum temperature and in winter and spring for average daily maximum temperature. However, for average daily maximum temperature, the summers of the 1930s and 1950s and the falls of the 1930s were warmer on average. The southeastern United States is one of the few regions in the world that has experienced little overall warming of daily maximum temperatures since 1900. The reasons for this have been the subject of much research, and hypothesized causes include both human and natural influences.13,14,15,16,17 However, since the early 1960s, the Southeast has been warming at a similar rate as the rest of the United States (Ch. 2: Climate, Figure 2.4). During the 2010s, the number of nights with minimum temperatures greater than 75°F was nearly double the long-term average for 1901–1960 (Figure 19.1), while the length of the freeze-free season was nearly 1.5 weeks greater than any other period in the historical record (Figure 19.2). These increases were widespread across the region and can have important effects on both humans and the natural environment.18 By contrast, the number of days above 95°F has been lower since 1960 compared to the pre-1960 period, with the highest numbers occurring in the 1930s and 1950s, both periods of severe drought (Figure 19.1). The differing trends in hot days and warm nights reflect the seasonal differences in average daily maximum and average daily minimum temperature trends." 

 

https://nca2018.globalchange.gov/chapter/19/

 

 

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DAVEinMB
21 hours ago, RJ said:

They were closed. We are members there and we got word they are doing "Timed Tickets" now. Essentially from the sounds of it you make an appointment and are allowed in during that time slot. 

Great zoo and gardens!

 

Awesome man, thanks for the info!

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howfam
On 4/2/2020 at 7:33 PM, howfam said:

Well, the filiferas are hardy to low teens , even single digits in their native California. If they lose any hardiness in the Southeastern U.S., it shouldn't be very much. I think the biggest threat to the Washies anywhere these days is the fusarium wilt that's killing them in California and other places. Check out the 2 filiferas in the pic below here in Jacksonville, Fl. ; there are others in town and they always look healthy.507.thumb.JPG.003aa91f64994420763a3e549d4ca4a9.JPG

DAVEinMB: Just to follow up on the W. filifera palms I recently posted, located here in Jacksonville , Fl. off I-95 at a Denny's restaurant. As you can see one of them has recently died since that 2012 photo.  Notice the height difference of the remaining one since then. Notice also the native sabal palmettos in the background, how much they've grown./howfam 

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DAVEinMB

Really full pindo I came across yesterday

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DAVEinMB

Interesting looking butia. The trunk is about a foot in diameter, can't say I've seen any others in the area like this. 

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DAVEinMB

Found two decent sized mules yesterday in a coastal residential area. Some health CIDP as well. 

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DAVEinMB

A nursery in town planted a couple large sylvestris on the corner of their lot. Have some large ones for sale as well. 

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CodyORB
On 9/23/2019 at 12:48 PM, DAVEinMB said:

Anyone wanna take a stab at what this one is? The crown is pretty disheveled so it's tough to make out. Doesn't look like canary to me but who knows. 

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A poorly trimmed Phoenix Sylvesteris?

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DAVEinMB
17 minutes ago, CodyORB said:

A poorly trimmed Phoenix Sylvesteris?

I was leaning towards that are perhaps a hybrid. Sadly I think that palm last the battle to the spot light its crown was up against. 

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DAVEinMB

Some more washies, these all look old enough to have gone through the week of ice storms in 14 and the polar vortex of 18.

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SailorBold

Great area for palms... 

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DAVEinMB

Drove by this Phoenix today so thought I'd share its current state. 

January 2019 vs July 2020. 

This one may not be a hybrid 

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DAVEinMB

This one is pretty 

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