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TexasColdHardyPalms

Odessa, TX Sabal Mexicana

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TexasColdHardyPalms

I stumbled across these quite old Mexicana in an odessa neighborhood a few weeks ago.  This small subdivision has them planted throughout and there are plenty of seedlings and juveniles that have grown through the years.  The tallest specimens are roughly 20' CT. 

20190826_133939.jpg

20190826_133853.jpg

20190826_133910.jpg

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

There looking right at home there, very nice specimens 

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TexasColdHardyPalms

Those are by far the largest Sabals I've seen in West Texas. 

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OC2Texaspalmlvr
16 minutes ago, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

Those are by far the largest Sabals I've seen in West 

Are mexicanas normally not as tall as regular palmettos ? 

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TexasColdHardyPalms

I believe they top out at roughly the same height but they both take forever to attain their terminal height.

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SailorBold

Very nice!   I think that may be a good palm for Albuquerque...  I was thinking of a uresana too.. but that may be the one..  Those are amazing!

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TexasColdHardyPalms

Mexicana are more leaf hardy than uresana, but smaller and less pretty IMO.

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Jcalvin
On 9/16/2019 at 2:42 PM, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

I believe they top out at roughly the same height but they both take forever to attain their terminal height.

Is the slower growing due to the amount of rain they get, considering they grow in a drier environment? Would the growth rate would be just as fast as other sabal palms, palms grown in the southeast and tropical regions, if they received the same amount of water. 

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Austinpalm

I have both sabals in my  yard.  Both are watered the same.  Mexicana grows faster. Uresana is the slowest sabal in my experience.

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TexasColdHardyPalms

Uresana are not fast.  Mexicana seem to grow faster than a palmetto too here. But that may be due to precipitation. 

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jimmyt
On 9/16/2019 at 10:00 AM, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

I stumbled across these quite old Mexicana in an odessa neighborhood a few weeks ago.  This small subdivision has them planted throughout and there are plenty of seedlings and juveniles that have grown through the years.  The tallest specimens are roughly 20' CT. 

20190826_133939.jpg

20190826_133853.jpg

20190826_133910.jpg

Odessa needs to change the name of that street from Fair Palm to Great Palm.  For sure!

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Jcalvin
On ‎9‎/‎16‎/‎2019 at 11:00 AM, TexasColdHardyPalms said:

I stumbled across these quite old Mexicana in an odessa neighborhood a few weeks ago.  This small subdivision has them planted throughout and there are plenty of seedlings and juveniles that have grown through the years.  The tallest specimens are roughly 20' CT. 

20190826_133939.jpg

20190826_133853.jpg

20190826_133910.jpg

Is the skirt of dead fronds a normal trait of Mexicana? The sabals we have here stay much cleaner at the trunk (the dead fronds self-clean at a faster rate).

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Fusca
1 hour ago, Jcalvin said:

Is the skirt of dead fronds a normal trait of Mexicana? The sabals we have here stay much cleaner at the trunk (the dead fronds self-clean at a faster rate).

Seems to be a normal trait.  The mexicana I've seen in habitat almost always had several dead fronds on them and some had "skirts" like Washingtonias. They tend to retain the leaf boots longer than palmettos as well.  Unfortunately many commercial plantings here tend to be over-trimmed like the palmettos in Florida.

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Brian F. Austin
On 10/4/2019 at 2:15 PM, Fusca said:

Seems to be a normal trait.  The mexicana I've seen in habitat almost always had several dead fronds on them and some had "skirts" like Washingtonias. They tend to retain the leaf boots longer than palmettos as well.  Unfortunately many commercial plantings here tend to be over-trimmed like the palmettos in Florida.

Here's one in Austin that has a skirt. It's a pretty massive tree. The second pic has small camp in front of it for scale.

 

 

 

IMG_0657.jpg

IMG_2476.jpeg

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Brian F. Austin

This isn't my photo but it shows a crazy skirt on some sabal uresanas. I'm thinking in their natural habitat fire happens every so often and torches the skirts.

 

IMG_0010.jpg.334b18f236ec593f708f43ee1c65549a.jpg

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RJ
1 hour ago, Brian F. Austin said:

Here's one in Austin that has a skirt. It's a pretty massive tree. The second pic has small camp in front of it for scale.

 

 

 

 

IMG_2476.jpeg

That's a massive sable. :yay:

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Silas_Sancona
6 hours ago, Brian F. Austin said:

This isn't my photo but it shows a crazy skirt on some sabal uresanas. I'm thinking in their natural habitat fire happens every so often and torches the skirts.

 

IMG_0010.jpg.334b18f236ec593f708f43ee1c65549a.jpg

Possible, though I think fire doesnt play as much of a role in most of the ecosystems in that area of Sonora where S. uresana occurres ( Tropical Deciduous Forest, Thornscrub, etc ) in comparison with other more fire prone / adapted habitats in California, Texas, or Florida/ US Southeastern states. Could be too that what fires occur there are infrequent, at least naturallycaused ones. Fire is extremely detrimental to our section of the overall Sonoran region for sure. 

Thinking use of the fronds for thatching by both local natives and ranchers plays a big part on some of the cleaner looking specimens you might see pictures of from habitat. 

Great to see these with their skirts regardless:greenthumb:

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PalmTreeDude

It seems like mexicana form a good sized skirt compared to some other Sabals. Here is a skirt on a Sabal palmetto that I saw in habitat (South Carolina). It's definitely not like the skirts that more western Sabals can form! 

IMG_1653.JPG

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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RJ

The humidity of the SE vs W. Texas I'm sure plays a role in the skirts. 

 

 

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