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NC_Palm_Enthusiast

Tips for Sabal "Louisiana"

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast

I potted these sabals about a month ago and they don't seem to be doing too well. I ordered all three of them online from a palm nursery in Florida and they did arrive with a few wilting/discolored fronds. What worries me is that there has been little to no improvement in their condition since. I water them once every 1-2 days, make sure they get plenty of sun, and I potted them in well draining, palm specific soil. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong but any tips would be greatly appreciated. (BTW: I plan to overwinter them inside in pots and then plant them in the ground next spring if they're still alive)

Here's a few pictures of them:

Sabal1.jpg.a0fde1e017855f83d29b5e64020f1430.jpgSabal2.jpg.3145e708ccfc72d3ed847a0df35e4f54.jpgSabal3.jpg.2badbb5a24a3ccac0d3af7de09c669f4.jpg

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

How much sun do they get ? Were these palms shade grown ? Mine gets about 8 hrs a day and grows like a weed. Mark the new spears and check to see how much there growing. The brown tipping could be from not enough water these palms cant be drowned =) 

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RJ

Were they shipped bare root? I find certain palms , Sabals included take a month or two to get back in the swing of things if they have been shipped bare root. 

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Turtlesteve

I agree with RJ - they don't like being bare rooted.  Should be OK with time.

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
4 hours ago, RJ said:

Were they shipped bare root? I find certain palms , Sabals included take a month or two to get back in the swing of things if they have been shipped bare root. 

Yes, they were shipped bare root. Hopefully that’s the only problem

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

For all my bare root seedlings i over water the palms when first planted, to get the soil air free around your roots 

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Chester B
5 hours ago, Turtlesteve said:

I agree with RJ - they don't like being bare rooted.  Should be OK with time.

Same experience for me.  I find small sabals grow very slow and pick up speed with size.

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Hillizard

It's possible your plants are putting their energy first into developing an underground stem, as an evolutionary survival mechanism, before developing new leaves: http://w3.biosci.utexas.edu/prc/DigFlora/Waller/trunk/SAMI8-undergnd.html

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PalmTreeDude

My Sabal minor 'Dallas' that I planted as bare root seedlings into the ground took about one and a half months to do anything. Then they all got new spears coming up and have been pumping out fronds ever since. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
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