Jump to content
NC_Palm_Enthusiast

Tips for Sabal "Louisiana"

Recommended Posts

NC_Palm_Enthusiast

I potted these sabals about a month ago and they don't seem to be doing too well. I ordered all three of them online from a palm nursery in Florida and they did arrive with a few wilting/discolored fronds. What worries me is that there has been little to no improvement in their condition since. I water them once every 1-2 days, make sure they get plenty of sun, and I potted them in well draining, palm specific soil. I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong but any tips would be greatly appreciated. (BTW: I plan to overwinter them inside in pots and then plant them in the ground next spring if they're still alive)

Here's a few pictures of them:

Sabal1.jpg.a0fde1e017855f83d29b5e64020f1430.jpgSabal2.jpg.3145e708ccfc72d3ed847a0df35e4f54.jpgSabal3.jpg.2badbb5a24a3ccac0d3af7de09c669f4.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OC2Texaspalmlvr

How much sun do they get ? Were these palms shade grown ? Mine gets about 8 hrs a day and grows like a weed. Mark the new spears and check to see how much there growing. The brown tipping could be from not enough water these palms cant be drowned =) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RJ

Were they shipped bare root? I find certain palms , Sabals included take a month or two to get back in the swing of things if they have been shipped bare root. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Turtlesteve

I agree with RJ - they don't like being bare rooted.  Should be OK with time.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
NC_Palm_Enthusiast
4 hours ago, RJ said:

Were they shipped bare root? I find certain palms , Sabals included take a month or two to get back in the swing of things if they have been shipped bare root. 

Yes, they were shipped bare root. Hopefully that’s the only problem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OC2Texaspalmlvr

For all my bare root seedlings i over water the palms when first planted, to get the soil air free around your roots 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chester B
5 hours ago, Turtlesteve said:

I agree with RJ - they don't like being bare rooted.  Should be OK with time.

Same experience for me.  I find small sabals grow very slow and pick up speed with size.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hillizard

It's possible your plants are putting their energy first into developing an underground stem, as an evolutionary survival mechanism, before developing new leaves: http://w3.biosci.utexas.edu/prc/DigFlora/Waller/trunk/SAMI8-undergnd.html

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmTreeDude

My Sabal minor 'Dallas' that I planted as bare root seedlings into the ground took about one and a half months to do anything. Then they all got new spears coming up and have been pumping out fronds ever since. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      Several days ago I received a request for an update on our world famous Sabal Row. But first, some background. I joined PalmTalk and IPS in Jan. 2008 and soon decided I wanted to germinate palm seeds. I chose (and recommend) the Sabal genus for beginning palm growers. Sabal palmetto is FL's State Tree and ubiquitous and I managed to beg, buy and barter Sabals domingensis and maritima. From early 2008 into 2009 I germinated a slew of seedlings. A quick tangent: In 2003 during the housing bubble, some HGTV rejects decided to build a spec home four lots east of our little cottage. Then that spec home bounced through a series of flippers, sustained roof damage in Hurricane Charley and thereafter sat empty and abandoned year after year until well into the housing bust. I looked across the vacant lot next door at that never-lived-in stack of cinder blocks and decided to plant my side of the vacant lot with Sabal seedlings to block views at and from that abandoned edifice. What you see in the following photos grew up since 2009 (the house sold in 2010; the neighbors are nice people). None of these palms are technically mine but I hope if anyone ever builds there, they appreciate privacy as much as we.
      Note: Sabals domingensis and maritima are really large palms. Sabal palmetto is the smallest trunking Sabal and one of the slowest growing. Sabal causiarum is a total behemoth. I added a seedling one to the Row after the others and it dwarfs them all.
      Sabal Row, March 2020, Cape Coral, FL

      Sabal Trunks x3: Palm on left is S. palmetto. Other two may be domingensis and maritima (ID tags disappeared long ago)

      Sabal maritima (left), Sabal palmetto (right) - Same age but look at size differential.

      Opposite view: Sabal palmetto (right) and Sabal maritima (left)

      Sabal palmetto Trunk

      Sabal maritima trunk

    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      I germinated the little stemless Sabal in the photos below 11+ years ago from seeds sent to me as "Sabal etonia." My recollection is that these seeds came from a generous PTer in Europe, which complicates matters more than a bit but I was eager to find seeds of S. etonia to test my germination skills. This is the only remaining palm from that lot of seedlings. As I have never met a Sabal etonia in the flesh, I have assumed for years mine is a true etonia. But now I wonder if it might not be a Sabal minor and a "uber dwarf" minor at that. For a Sabal that may be nearly 12 years old, it has remained remarkably tiny: 24" tall by 30" wide. It flowers yearly and produces fewer than 100 fairly small seeds. Its leaves are green but show occasional blue hints and are almost flat. Sabal minor has flat leaves while Sabal etonia leaves are quite costapalmate.
      Please study the photos and help me decide which stemless Sabal this guy is.

    • The Steve
      By The Steve
      I’ve been growing these up for a few years now, and I was wondering how much longer before I can start to spot the true lisas.  I’m thinking that I’ll need to pot them up to one gallons.  Thoughts?
    • SEVA
      By SEVA
      I'm not sure if this belongs in the weather/climate section, but I read this phenomenon occurs after extended periods without rain and little/no wind allowing the natural oils to develop on the surface of the water. I captured these photos recently at a local swamp.


    • NC_Palm_Enthusiast
      By NC_Palm_Enthusiast
      This afternoon while walking the Piedmont Trail (off Strawberry Road) in Greensboro, I stumbled upon a couple dozen or more sabal minors growing in a swampy area parallel to Lake Brandt. There were volunteers coming up everywhere, along with several older palms. My guess is somebody threw some seeds along the trail or planted a couple and they reproduced. Greensboro is around 80 miles west of the fall line, so pretty far away from the native range of dwarf palmettos. Here are some pictures I took:


      I also saw some of what I think are Southern Magnolias coming up. Here they are:

×
×
  • Create New...