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cm05

Palms in New York City

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cm05

New York City is a high end zone 7b, cold hardy palms are very rare, but they’re there if you know where to look. Tropical palms, however, are all over the place during the warmer months.

Sabal minor growing out in the open in Tompkins Square Park in Manhattan:

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It’s flowering, hopefully it seeds so I can grab them all lol, anyone want a Manhattan Minor?

30FDCAF5-429A-48AD-93AE-2CB9D572C185.jpeg.5bd0c1f6eed296f4146a2b5f72388bf9.jpeg

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cm05

Here’s Trachycarpus fortunei growing on the Lower East Side of Manhattan:

One in the back looks dead:

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Picture perfect:

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Biggest Trachycarpus I’ve ever seen:

C1CAEF5A-930D-4F20-BCD0-56CBBB0359CA.thumb.jpeg.08be1a5f502dc4c42464975b05e6dc8e.jpeg

Crown looks a bit tattered:

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cm05

The Trachys were growing amongst 50-60 foot bamboo:

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Kind of scary (to me) to be underneath all of this when the wind started blowing, it felt like they were going to snap.

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cm05

Christmas Palms, these are probably second to Majesty Palms as the most popular palm in NYC:

1D7AB974-C95D-4F91-A23D-B25E96DCE1BB.thumb.jpeg.3967869d61f7e831bd2185bd1f14bfad.jpeg

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A nice Roebelenii, these are also super popular:88547D21-CA66-4202-A45B-17F26C6FF1AF.thumb.jpeg.419644fb1192e4161e658ef622265c06.jpeg

Trunking Yucca:

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Edited by cm05
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cm05

Palms (and miscellaneous large plants) for sale:

AF5DED14-9076-400A-8F37-26F54DD743BB.thumb.jpeg.9114c881ec2a0672566040f9cacdbb79.jpeg

Kentias, a bit pricy, small one was $65:

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More Christmas Palms and a Washingtonia at Lido Beach:

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cm05

Last summer I stumbled upon an outdoor restaurant with hoards of tall trunking Coconuts and other palms, I don’t remember where it was and I’m kicking myself for not taking pictures.

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kinzyjr

@cm05 I love seeing Sabal minor and Rhapidophyllum hystrix expand their range as well as seeing Trachycarpus used in marginal areas.  Thanks for sharing!

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palmsOrl

I'm duly impressed.

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Rickybobby

I love this thread!

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