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Kim

A Little Experiment

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Kim

In the Moku Garden, four Clinostigma have died, one after the other. The pattern seems to have stopped for now, but a couple of stumps were left in the garden. One spot in particular had been so perfect for the large elegant palm, so I decided to try a little experiment. 

On top of the stump,  which measures about 15 inches across, I placed 2 seeds of Clinostigma samoense.  I checked them in April -- no sign of life. In July, still nothing. But a couple of days ago -- boom!

IMG_9771.thumb.jpg.3564ea2ef5a34c90f24be3d31bcde092.jpg

 

IMG_9770.thumb.jpg.31b212241f531d0df91240a7e907dca8.jpg

 

The question is -- will the seed continue to grow on the stump as the stump gradually rots? Curious if anyone has done this? If so, how did it work out? Any photos?

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Fusca

That's an interesting experiment Kim!  I don't imagine it being much different than seedlings growing in the old leaf boots like I've seen a lot with Butia odorata.  Once I pulled out a Butia seedling with a stem the size of my fist and fully pinnate leaves so it must have been growing there at least 4 or 5 years before I "rescued" it.  The only difference I see in your case is full sun exposure which may not be a problem if it gets plenty of irrigation.

Jon

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Kim

Thanks for your comments, Fusca. Fortunately, full sun exposure in this part of Hawaii has no ill effects on small palms. Your story about the Butia odorata gives me hope. B)

 

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Jeff Searle

Interesting Kim. I think with the stump being organic in nature, coupled with Hawaii's abundant rainfall, heat and humidity......you have a perfect storm. Or should I say, a very nice condition for growing. The only thing I see that will prevent the seedling from growing and doing well would be, if the trunk base is still hard and won't allow the roots to grow properly. A little liquid fertilizer every week would do wonders I'm sure. keep us posted.

Jeff

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realarch

Hi Kim, I had to remove three large Clinos awhile back and left about 3' of stump to use as pedestals for other plants. having left so much mass, the partial trunks oozed for months and were rather smelly. Eventually they dried out and I planted bromeliads in the soft center and they grew quite well. Over a period of time they just degraded and started to collapse, so I put a band around the top to prolong the pedestal, but eventually they are in the process of total decay. I use what's left of the trunk as mulch which is an incredible amount of organic material. Whenever I cut palms down, I just stack the trunks somewhere and use as mulch after they break down.  

Be careful that what's left of the trunk where you're planting, isn't too soggy and that it does dry out and drain. 

Here are a couple of photos of the last one standing with the band around the top.

Tim

P1080078.jpg

P1080080.jpg

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Kim

Jeff and Tim, thanks for the comments and illustrations. Bo and I were talking about it, and we think the roots of the fast-growing Clinostigma will be quite aggressive and take hold through the rotting stump with no trouble. At this point I am actually more concerned about my garden help and the weed whacker. :lol:  I am curious to see how well the palm grows. 

The trunk from this stump produces a fresh crop of mushrooms once a week, but I do not intend to taste them...  It's lying nearby. I had another Clino stump that was maybe 5 ft. high, and it eventually collapsed from within, the inside almost like sawdust. Good mulch for sure.

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