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NC_Palm_Enthusiast

Sabal Minor "Louisiana" in Zone 7

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast

I just potted some sabal minor "Louisiana" seedlings I purchased online from a palm nursery in Florida. I've done some research on this variety and my plan is to overwinter them inside and then plant them in the ground next May. If any of you have had any experience with this specific palm in I would appreciate some advice/tips. Thanks

Here's a picture of them:

 

sabal louisiana.jpg

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast
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PalmatierMeg

You can leave them outside in pots as long as you don't get hard freezes. They will be much happier outdoors overall than in a dark, dry house. You may not have to keep them indoors except for coldest part of winter.

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
1 hour ago, PalmatierMeg said:

You can leave them outside in pots as long as you don't get hard freezes. They will be much happier outdoors overall than in a dark, dry house. You may not have to keep them indoors except for coldest part of winter.

Freezes aren't all that common here but they do happen. I was going to keep them in my basement under a lamp during this winter just to grow them a little bit before I plant them in the ground permanently. I've heard the bigger/more mature the palm is, the hardier it will be. Do you think they'll be ok if they get constant light from the lamp during the day? My basement is typically pretty humid, as well. I just want to make sure I don't kill them somehow over the winter.

Edited by NC_Palm_Enthusiast

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PalmatierMeg

They will appreciate the light and any extra heat indoors.

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palmsOrl

You can probably plant them around April 15 without any worries.

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oasis371

This variety is my favorite of the Sabal minors, as they show robust growth.  I would NOT overwinter them in containers outside in your zone, as the pots would freeze..., the ground is much warmer and less prone to wild temperature fluctuations.  I overwinter my containerized Louisianas in a relatively cold (but largely frost free garage) without any problems.  Temps probably average 40-55 in the Winter but can drop to 30 F..  You can then transplant them into the ground the Spring. Not sure how they would respond though, if your only option was an overly warm area of you house. (I have a few Louisianas, and Sabal mexicana, and bermudana--my favorite Sabal).

Edited by oasis371
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Allen

They could probably be planted now and just mulched with a pile of leaves if it gets cold if you want to do that.  Better is wait till next April.  When they are small they stay much closer to the warm ground and should have few problems unless temps go under 5F

Edited by Allen
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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
On 8/25/2019 at 4:52 PM, oasis371 said:

This variety is my favorite of the Sabal minors, as they show robust growth.  I would NOT overwinter them in containers outside in your zone, as the pots would freeze..., the ground is much warmer and less prone to wild temperature fluctuations.  I overwinter my containerized Louisianas in a relatively cold (but largely frost free garage) without any problems.  Temps probably average 40-55 in the Winter but can drop to 30 F..  You can then transplant them into the ground the Spring. Not sure how they would respond though, if your only option was an overly warm area of you house. (I have a few Louisianas, and Sabal mexicana, and bermudana--my favorite Sabal).

Interesting, I was thinking about storing them in the basement with a lamp over them. The only thing I worry about down there is a lack of humidity. 

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RaleighNC

Low relative humidity in the air does not seem to be a problem for them, as long as they are well watered.  How much light will they get? I've grown them indoors over winter under high-output t5 lamps, and it gives them quite a boost, relative to those in the ground (which do not grow over winter). But if you cannot give them a decent amount of light, you might not get much benefit.

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
22 hours ago, RaleighNC said:

Low relative humidity in the air does not seem to be a problem for them, as long as they are well watered.  How much light will they get? I've grown them indoors over winter under high-output t5 lamps, and it gives them quite a boost, relative to those in the ground (which do not grow over winter). But if you cannot give them a decent amount of light, you might not get much benefit.

I see, I'll have to look into getting a couple of those t5 bulbs/tubes to put over them.

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mdsonofthesouth

How cold can they reliably take once mature?

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RaleighNC
On 8/27/2019 at 6:10 PM, NC_Palm_Enthusiast said:

I see, I'll have to look into getting a couple of those t5 bulbs/tubes to put over them.

If you do, try to get the high-output types. There is a "normal" t5 type as well, but are not nearly as bright. And generally you cannot put the T5HO bulbs into a normal t5 fixture because they need different ballasts.

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Allen
16 hours ago, mdsonofthesouth said:

How cold can they reliably take once mature?

I don't think anyone knows answers to stuff like this for sure.  Reliably they can take 32F  LOL .  Anyway these sabals are probably all different in some ways and have different characteristics.  For the ones I have under 5F I'd worry about Louisiana or Birmingham.  But The hardier sabals may take dips below 0F and be fine.   I expect my Minors to take 0F or below to -5F.  But they are all different even different minor varieties.

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mdsonofthesouth

I really like the idea of sabal Louisiana but I don't want to have to protect one every year after the establishment period seeing as the past 7 or 8 winters have had some pretty bellow average temps. Lowest I have seen was 3F, so Im thinking I should scrap the idea and just go with rhapidophyllum and regular sabal minor.  The former survived unprotected as a strap leaf its first winter (out in the open on the north side of the property) that was planted in early to mid July last year.  I will have 2 palms Ill have to protect almost every year and the trachycarpus most likely for a few years at least maybe forever. I want trouble free in my garden too lol. 

Edited by mdsonofthesouth
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Allen

My minors took 0F in 2018 and those stupid cold days here so they are pretty tough but even those have different varieties that are hardier or at least supposed to be.  All I know is I'm impressed that mine just had some cold spotting on the fronds after 2018.  They were about 4' tall.  I just planted 2 more Sabal Minor (Baker County) from Steve this year that were great size and I ordered 2 dwarf minors from Plant Delight just the other day.  

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NC_Palm_Enthusiast
On 8/30/2019 at 2:49 PM, mdsonofthesouth said:

I really like the idea of sabal Louisiana but I don't want to have to protect one every year after the establishment period seeing as the past 7 or 8 winters have had some pretty bellow average temps. Lowest I have seen was 3F, so Im thinking I should scrap the idea and just go with rhapidophyllum and regular sabal minor.  The former survived unprotected as a strap leaf its first winter (out in the open on the north side of the property) that was planted in early to mid July last year.  I will have 2 palms Ill have to protect almost every year and the trachycarpus most likely for a few years at least maybe forever. I want trouble free in my garden too lol. 

Sabal "louisiana" is supposed to be very cold hardy. According to the grower I purchased them from, they are good down to 5F. Where I live it's very rare for it to ever get below 15 and we don't get a whole lot of freezes so I don't think I'll have to worry about it as much as you might.

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PalmTreeDude

I planted Sabal minor 'Dallas' this Spring. They come from an area that regularly sees freezes (just not super intense freezes, for the most part) and can be pretty cold in the winter. I think they will be alright here, maybe you should check them out? 

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cm05

I don’t know much about their cold tolerance, although I remember someone on here shared photos of Sabal Louisiana in Wichita, KS that looked undamaged after below zero temperatures.

I just know that once established they’re faster than regular minor. My Louisiana is a frond or two ahead of all of my other minors so far this year.

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