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Rickybobby

Possible Phoenix roebelliini hybrid

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Rickybobby

Ok everyone I have two 7 gallon roebellinis 

first is a clump of 4 I got last year. Look at the old growth and the crown and the fronds overall height

pic two is a so called roebellini but the crown and dead cuts are still very green the fronds stretching (maybe shade grown? But there’s a yellow line that runs on the sides of the petiole which the first one doesn’t have. Also I cut the spikes off these when I can since there on my patio. The first with the cuts stays green. The second turns yellow  

911DC7B3-434B-4B8E-AAA1-FF0A88EC96EB.jpeg

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Rickybobby

74976168-FC40-456D-989D-3F30202E9B9D.jpeg

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Rickybobby

0AC940A6-235C-4943-BF85-C144C9F0F088.jpeg

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Rickybobby

As you can see the two bottom pics look different r from the top clump of 4 

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gyuseppe

not hybrids, they are all roebelenii

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Phoenikakias

Agree with Giuseppe. In this context I would like to shed some light on the sexual dimorphism of this sp. Botanists are already aware of this fact according to testimony of Alex Nessanelis. Female specimens are more robust with  longer fronds.

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Rickybobby
3 hours ago, Phoenikakias said:

Agree with Giuseppe. In this context I would like to shed some light on the sexual dimorphism of this sp. Botanists are already aware of this fact according to testimony of Alex Nessanelis. Female specimens are more robust with  longer fronds.

Interesting and thank you 

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gilles06

Yes roebelenii clustering form.

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Jim in Los Altos
19 hours ago, gilles06 said:

Yes roebelenii clustering form.

It may be clumping form or just several single stem roebelenii planted per pot. Most of the commercially available ones are just that, several palms plated together. 

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gilles06

The first picture make me say that is the clustering form...

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Hombre de Palmas

Great info here, I appreciate these posts. I did not know that there was a clustering and non-clustering form.

 

I also did not realize these palms were dimorphic. I planted several in the landscape, and I now wonder which is which? I also find myself trying to guess while we take our walks in the neighborhood, as they are quite ubiquitous in my area.

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Pal Meir
1 hour ago, Hombre de Palmas said:

Great info here, I appreciate these posts. I did not know that there was a clustering and non-clustering form.

The so-called Mekong type is clustering:

2057926741_PhoenixroebeleniiMekong.thumb.jpg.2991d29413233f8382bc334bffe87cbc.jpg

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Hombre de Palmas

Very interesting, hard to tell for sure, but those look to be over 12FT (3.6 Meters) which is the usual limit on height.

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Phoenikakias
1 hour ago, Hombre de Palmas said:

Great info here, I appreciate these posts. I did not know that there was a clustering and non-clustering form.

 

I also did not realize these palms were dimorphic. I planted several in the landscape, and I now wonder which is which? I also find myself trying to guess while we take our walks in the neighborhood, as they are quite ubiquitous in my area.

I wish I lived in such a palmy neighborhood...

Edited by Phoenikakias

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palmsOrl

Pal Meir, I wonder if many of the ones in Central and South Florida will get that type of height to them once they get really old (say 75 plus years).  Those are really attractive.

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Pal Meir

This was one of my Mekong seedlings which I gave away in 2008 to a botanical garden; the photo shows it when it was 2.5 yr old pushing its 9th leaf:

156690764_Phoenixroebelenii2006-09-18.thumb.jpg.edfd8d9be80f5607b8750e280d728b7a.jpg

 

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