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newtopalmsMD

Pindo in a pot questions

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newtopalmsMD

I have a pindo (from a big box store last Sept on clearance. ) It was in a 5 gallon pot (or maybe smaller).  It's now in a ten gallon pot full of Miracle Gro all purpose potting mix (plus whatever the big box store used in its smaller pot). I have been roundly chastised in other fora for using MG and peat in general.  So now that it is time to move it to 15 gallons, what should I use as a medium?  Since I live in zone 7a (with a bit of a 6b-ish micro-climate where my palms are planted :( ) this Pindo will forever be living in a pot, and be moved out of the really cold (into a garage with grow lights) during the winter.   Also I have both a 15 inch tall and a 12 inch tall 15 gallon pot,  Would the Pindo prefer taller and thinner  or shorter and wider pot?

Thanks

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Rickybobby

I feel like going from a 5g to a 15g in a year is too fast to plant up. I’m sure a lot will chime in on soil. Miracle grow is too wet and not well draining. One thing I like is coco perlite. It drains awesome plus it’s so light weight moving a 15g palm around is easy peezy 

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Merlyn2220

Pretty much all palms benefit from tall/deep type pots, as do cycads.  Pindos are pretty tough and tolerant of mistreatment, but they can die from excessive moisture and root rot.  They are pretty drought tolerant in the ground, and would probably want a relatively dry soil in a pot too.  I had some problems with a Jubaea x Butia hybrid in too rich of a soil, my mix was MG potting soil, coarse sand and perlite.  It was growing with very light colored (almost white) spear, which is a clear sign of mucky soil and likely root rot.  I repotted it with about 50% perlite and only about 25% MG potting soil and it's much, much happier!

I'm not a potted palm expert, but I'd agree with Rickybobby...Pindos are slow growers and going up to 15g seems like a big jump in 1 year.  A big percentage of inorganics that don't hold a lot of water is probably a good idea.  Perlite, expanded clay, expanded shale, etc.

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Brad Mondel

I grow mine in 100% MG garden soil in the green bag and they do fantastic. I fertilize with osmocote 14-14-14. 

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Brad Mondel

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newtopalmsMD

So here is a picture of  the Pindo including the trunk.  It feels kinda crowded to me (But i'm not a palm!).  The palm is over 3 feet tall.  If that still a lot of room I can hold off.  The second picture shows a few brown threads at the end of the most recent fronds, and the spear that is emerging (just a little right of center in the middle of the picture) is dark brown on the left side.  Anything I should do? or is this kinda normal?  

ThanksIMG_3250.jpg.657d1329c0fb61baaeafef3c02e5e5fe.jpg

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Merlyn2220

That pot is probably big enough for several more years of growth.  Pindos grow roots very slowly, so it's unlikely to fill that pot too soon.  The brown tips could be too much or too little water, generally Pindos want less water.  I see some dead spots and irregular light green areas, so a bit of good pot-safe fertilizer like Osmocote or Nutricote may be a good idea.  But I wouldn't reply it unless your soil is decomposing and becoming mucky, which can cause root rot.  In that case I would highly recommend reading the "soil mix" thread in this forum.

 

Edited by Merlyn2220

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