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newtopalmsMD

Trachy root size

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newtopalmsMD

I am planting a Trachycarpus Nainital in my pool area.  My question is, how far from the trunk will the roots grow?  I want to leave enough room from the cement decking  and some of the underground pipes that make the pool work.  Also I don't want to be planting annuals too close to the trachy and disturbing the trachy roots when I lift annuals for the winter.  

Also I have very well-draining clay (sounds odd I know).  Any thoughts on what medium I should plant in?  Just the native soil/clay.  Native clay emended with garden soil/humus? vermiculite? builders' sand?  Are there really 10 different ideas all of which work pretty much the same?

Many thanks!

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mdsonofthesouth

The root system shouldn't be too large. Palms typically don't root out like hardwoods or conifers. 

Edited by mdsonofthesouth

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newtopalmsMD

Thanks  And one more question.  It will reach the high 90's in each of the next three days.  Is that too hot to plant this trachy (maybe  foot of trunk and 4 feet of fronds.  It will be in the sun from 9am - 2:30pm once planted.  It arrived last night and the root ball is sitting in the plastic bag it was shipped in.  Its sitting in the shade right now

Thanks

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Rickybobby

The 90s won’t hurt the trachy. It will grow like a weed. Up here they love the hot days and cooler nights. They don’t like intense heat throughout the entire year a few months of it is fine from my experience anyway 

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Chester B

Trachys are great due to their non invasive root system.  You can plant them right up to structures unlike a maple oak.  Do you know if this palm was out in full sun?  It should probably be fine planting out even if it wasn't.  I've not seen one experience sun burn before, just some yellowing.  I would amend the soil somewhat and make sure it gets plenty of water this summer. 

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mdsonofthesouth

Id say plant away so long as you water it regularly. My trachycarpus love the heat, and honestly love all of our DMV weather save for the .5-5 days a year where we get abnormal winter temperatures. 

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Allen

Make sure to plant high in a mound is my suggestion so water doesn't pool around it in winter and when you protect it.

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mdsonofthesouth
7 hours ago, Allen said:

Make sure to plant high in a mound is my suggestion so water doesn't pool around it in winter and when you protect it.

 

I usually mound up mulch for winter in hopes of keeping water out. But I agree plant a little higher.

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RaleighNC

Even if your clay drains well, I would add plenty of organic matter, as this will help the soil retain nutrients, and depending on the type you use, will probably itself be a source of nutrients.

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mdsonofthesouth
9 hours ago, RaleighNC said:

Even if your clay drains well, I would add plenty of organic matter, as this will help the soil retain nutrients, and depending on the type you use, will probably itself be a source of nutrients.

I feel like trachycarpus do pretty well in my red clay, but better drainage would be nice!

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