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climate change virginia
13 hours ago, SEVA said:

 

 

Nice! How large are the Washingtonia sp. palms? I'm trialing a Washingtonia robusta and a few Syagrus romanzoffiana in Virginia Beach, which I planted over the summer. 

I dont know if they are but there around 1 foot of trunk

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SEVA

Chamaedorea cataractarum that survived last winter with only straw over it. 

B056D138-8246-490B-AD23-D5901E1FAB56.jpeg

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SEVA

Update on my largest Sabal Birmingham.

9B85B5A4-82CA-455A-BAF5-EDF861D508C7.jpeg

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SEVA

Fortunately, I still haven’t had to wrap the newest queens I planted earlier this year. So far, I’ve only seen it drop to 30F. I have these 2 and then a clump of queen palm seedlings. My largest queen, which is farther inland, has already been wrapped after seeing a low of 26F.

2E531CB3-53DE-467E-8B23-FF218E9B2748.jpeg

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Dartolution

@SEVA are the new queens any specific cultivar? Litoralis? Santa Catarina? 

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SEVA
17 minutes ago, Dartolution said:

@SEVA are the new queens any specific cultivar? Litoralis? Santa Catarina? 

The 2 in the photo are just regular queens from a big-box store. The clump is from regular queen palm seeds I germinated. I still have about 50 seedlings that I’m still deciding what to do with. Hopefully, someday I’ll get to grow a litoralis or Santa Catarina.

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climate change virginia
On 12/14/2020 at 11:22 AM, SEVA said:

Fortunately, I still haven’t had to wrap the newest queens I planted earlier this year. So far, I’ve only seen it drop to 30F. I have these 2 and then a clump of queen palm seedlings. My largest queen, which is farther inland, has already been wrapped after seeing a low of 26F.

2E531CB3-53DE-467E-8B23-FF218E9B2748.jpeg

how are you planning to protect them?

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Palm Man

I love your garden! It's beautiful and demonstrates what can be accomplished in zone 8a. How do you protect the queen? I have a large one in a container that I need to plant out and protect if possible. It's one of the Santa Catarina highlands queen palms. 

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Palm Man

I love your garden! It's beautiful and demonstrates what can be accomplished in zone 8a. How do you protect the queen? I have a large one in a container that I need to plant out and protect if possible. It's one of the Santa Catarina highlands queen palms. 

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DAVEinMB
On 11/17/2020 at 11:39 PM, SEVA said:

Chamaedorea cataractarum that survived last winter with only straw over it. 

B056D138-8246-490B-AD23-D5901E1FAB56.jpeg

That's pretty impressive. What was your ultimate low?

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EastCanadaTropicals
On 12/14/2020 at 12:14 PM, SEVA said:

The 2 in the photo are just regular queens from a big-box store. The clump is from regular queen palm seeds I germinated. I still have about 50 seedlings that I’m still deciding what to do with. Hopefully, someday I’ll get to grow a litoralis or Santa Catarina.

Where you from?

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happy1892
On 7/7/2019 at 11:28 PM, SEVA said:

Some kind of citrus. The root stock took over after a navel orange died.  It's been in the ground for a few years now and remains evergreen.

0704191758.jpg

Poncirus trifoliata.  Trifoliate Orange.  They are cold hardy to zone 5.  They graft oranges to Trifoliate orange rootstock to get more cold hardiness from what I read.  I believe they are native to South Korea and other areas in East Asia.

 

Cold hardy citrus article on Wikipedia, if you are interested. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold-hardy_citrus

In the wiki article there are Chinese manderin oranges (Citrus reticulata) listed that are hardy down to the teens and even one variety of Manderin orange able to go down to 9F.

Edited by happy1892
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amh
1 hour ago, happy1892 said:

Poncirus trifoliata.  Trifoliate Orange.  They are cold hardy to zone 5.  They graft oranges to Trifoliate orange rootstock to get more cold hardiness from what I read.  I believe they are native to South Korea and other areas in East Asia.

 

Cold hardy citrus article on Wikipedia, if you are interested. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold-hardy_citrus

In the wiki article there are Chinese manderin oranges (Citrus reticulata) listed that are hardy down to the teens and even one variety of Manderin orange able to go down to 9F.

Changsha mandarin is a great cold hardy variety that will grow true to seed.

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SEVA
On 1/19/2021 at 9:16 AM, climate change virginia said:

how are you planning to protect them?

I’ll probably use a similar protection method as my largest queen, if necessary. 
 

On 1/19/2021 at 9:44 AM, Palm Man said:

I love your garden! It's beautiful and demonstrates what can be accomplished in zone 8a. How do you protect the queen? I have a large one in a container that I need to plant out and protect if possible. It's one of the Santa Catarina highlands queen palms. 

Thank you. I use burlap and Christmas lights, with the lights plugged into a thermocube. 

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SEVA
On 1/19/2021 at 11:39 AM, DAVEinMB said:

That's pretty impressive. What was your ultimate low?

I want to say the lowest temperature was 21F, but I can’t remember for sure. I just know it never dropped into the teens that winter.

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SEVA
3 hours ago, happy1892 said:

Poncirus trifoliata.  Trifoliate Orange.  They are cold hardy to zone 5.  They graft oranges to Trifoliate orange rootstock to get more cold hardiness from what I read.  I believe they are native to South Korea and other areas in East Asia.

 

Cold hardy citrus article on Wikipedia, if you are interested. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cold-hardy_citrus

In the wiki article there are Chinese manderin oranges (Citrus reticulata) listed that are hardy down to the teens and even one variety of Manderin orange able to go down to 9F.

I don’t think what I have is Poncirus trifoliataP. trifoliata is deciduous, but the Citrus sp. I have is evergreen.  I’m hoping it blooms this year and produces fruit, so I can potentially figure it out. Thank you for the article, I might have to add that one to the garden. I have hardy grapefruits as well, but they’re just seedlings. 

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happy1892
1 hour ago, SEVA said:

I don’t think what I have is Poncirus trifoliataP. trifoliata is deciduous, but the Citrus sp. I have is evergreen.  I’m hoping it blooms this year and produces fruit, so I can potentially figure it out. Thank you for the article, I might have to add that one to the garden. I have hardy grapefruits as well, but they’re just seedlings. 

Yes indeed they are deciduous!  But I think they could be evergreen in milder winter areas.  I have one that was from a rootstock, too, and it is evergreen here in North Carolina.  A family from our Church has the curly branched variety of what looks like Trifoliate orange, and it too is evergreen through our mild winters.  They let me to pull up the seedlings of the curly orange for me to grow, which they were mowing over.   They didn't know what it was till I told them.

 

I didn't know there were cold hardy grapefruit trees!  I had one seedling of grapefruit under the Trifoliate orange bush in our garden and it has survived a few winters so far.  But it never grows because it keeps getting frost damage.

 

-Nathaniel Long IV

Edited by happy1892

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amh
27 minutes ago, SEVA said:

I don’t think what I have is Poncirus trifoliataP. trifoliata is deciduous, but the Citrus sp. I have is evergreen.  I’m hoping it blooms this year and produces fruit, so I can potentially figure it out. Thank you for the article, I might have to add that one to the garden. I have hardy grapefruits as well, but they’re just seedlings. 

I cant identify the root stock, but there are a few trifoliate orange hybrids used for root stock.

http://citruspages.free.fr/trifoliates.php

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SEVA
22 hours ago, happy1892 said:

Yes indeed they are deciduous!  But I think they could be evergreen in milder winter areas.  I have one that was from a rootstock, too, and it is evergreen here in North Carolina.  A family from our Church has the curly branched variety of what looks like Trifoliate orange, and it too is evergreen through our mild winters.  They let me to pull up the seedlings of the curly orange for me to grow, which they were mowing over.   They didn't know what it was till I told them.

 

I didn't know there were cold hardy grapefruit trees!  I had one seedling of grapefruit under the Trifoliate orange bush in our garden and it has survived a few winters so far.  But it never grows because it keeps getting frost damage.

 

-Nathaniel Long IV

That’s interesting that the trifoliate oranges in your area have retained their foliage through mild winters. I collected fruit from a local trifoliate orange flying dragon recently and it has dropped all of its leaves. The lowest temperature my weather station has recorded so far this winter is 25.8F. Of course the temperature there could have been slightly lower or higher.  At what temperature do the ones in your area drop their leaves? I don’t think I’ve seen a trifoliate orange retain its leaves throughout a winter. I’m still thinking my Citrus sp. isn’t a trifoliate orange, at least not pure. Maybe a hybrid with trifoliate orange. My reason other than being evergreen, is that it has exhibited dieback in the colder winters. Even if we had a repeat of our record low temperatures, I don’t think that would be cold enough to damage a pure trifoliate orange. 
 

The tree referred to as a hardy grapefruit was labeled Poncirus trifoliata Citrus paradisi. After seeing one in Norfolk, I just had to find one. 

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happy1892
On 1/24/2021 at 8:01 PM, SEVA said:

That’s interesting that the trifoliate oranges in your area have retained their foliage through mild winters. I collected fruit from a local trifoliate orange flying dragon recently and it has dropped all of its leaves. The lowest temperature my weather station has recorded so far this winter is 25.8F. Of course the temperature there could have been slightly lower or higher.  At what temperature do the ones in your area drop their leaves? I don’t think I’ve seen a trifoliate orange retain its leaves throughout a winter. I’m still thinking my Citrus sp. isn’t a trifoliate orange, at least not pure. Maybe a hybrid with trifoliate orange. My reason other than being evergreen, is that it has exhibited dieback in the colder winters. Even if we had a repeat of our record low temperatures, I don’t think that would be cold enough to damage a pure trifoliate orange. 
 

The tree referred to as a hardy grapefruit was labeled Poncirus trifoliata Citrus paradisi. After seeing one in Norfolk, I just had to find one. 

Interesting.  We have already been as low as 19F one night some weeks ago, which is colder than what you had in Southeastern Virginia.  You are a bit farther north than we are in North Carolina, but since you are on the coast it makes the winters milder for how far north you are.  Could the daylight or average winter temperature be different enough in Southeastern Virginia to cause leaves to drop?  Our Trifoliate orange that I got from a rootstock has not lost its leaves from winter before.  The first year I planted it outside it did loose its leaves, and some branches died back in later Spring, but I think that was rather something like a disease from bad drainage or damp weather?  It was fine through the coldest nights in mid-winter, until Spring came.  

I am not 100 percent confident that mine or yours are pure Trifoliate orange.  As you said there is the possibility of it being a hybrid that makes it look quite similar to a pure Poncirus trifoliata.

 

-Nathaniel Long IV

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amh
20 hours ago, happy1892 said:

Interesting.  We have already been as low as 19F one night some weeks ago, which is colder than what you had in Southeastern Virginia.  You are a bit farther north than we are in North Carolina, but since you are on the coast it makes the winters milder for how far north you are.  Could the daylight or average winter temperature be different enough in Southeastern Virginia to cause leaves to drop?  Our Trifoliate orange that I got from a rootstock has not lost its leaves from winter before.  The first year I planted it outside it did loose its leaves, and some branches died back in later Spring, but I think that was rather something like a disease from bad drainage or damp weather?  It was fine through the coldest nights in mid-winter, until Spring came.  

I am not 100 percent confident that mine or yours are pure Trifoliate orange.  As you said there is the possibility of it being a hybrid that makes it look quite similar to a pure Poncirus trifoliata.

 

-Nathaniel Long IV

My trifoliate orange plants are variable in being deciduous, some plants have retained leaves, some plants have lost their leaves, some plants have red and orange leaves, and some have dead leaves. These are all the standard type and from the same source.

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SEVA

Picture sent to me this morning of the queen lit up. First snow this winter, and we got more than previously expected. 

EC55D650-FCF3-4E84-A996-CA2193BFEF92.jpeg

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SEVA

Washingtonia robusta

B439FA2E-A5AE-4D8F-8BF2-A11132415C89.jpeg

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happy1892
On 1/28/2021 at 2:21 PM, amh said:

My trifoliate orange plants are variable in being deciduous, some plants have retained leaves, some plants have lost their leaves, some plants have red and orange leaves, and some have dead leaves. These are all the standard type and from the same source.

Okay.  I just recently looked at the curly branched Trifoliate orange bushes at the house where our Church meets and they have lost their leaves...  the seedlings that I took have kept their leaves though.  I have noticed that juvenile plants or trees tend to keep their leaves through winter.  Maybe it is the same with the Trifoliate orange.

-Nathaniel Long

Edited by happy1892
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climate change virginia
On 1/15/2020 at 12:18 AM, SEVA said:

Closer view of the largest Sabal Birmingham.

0114201212.jpg

WOAH THATS A MONSTER NICE :greenthumb:

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SEVA
On 2/4/2021 at 7:29 PM, happy1892 said:

Okay.  I just recently looked at the curly branched Trifoliate orange bushes at the house where our Church meets and they have lost their leaves...  the seedlings that I took have kept their leaves though.  I have noticed that juvenile plants or trees tend to keep their leaves through winter.  Maybe it is the same with the Trifoliate orange.

-Nathaniel Long

It’s certainly possible, I’ve seen that as well in the juvenile deciduous oaks around here. 

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SEVA
On 2/5/2021 at 8:03 AM, climate change virginia said:

WOAH THATS A MONSTER NICE :greenthumb:

It’s gaining some size, but slowly! I just can’t wait until it produces inflorescences, if it does.

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SEVA
On 1/20/2021 at 6:08 PM, EastCanadaTropicals said:

Where you from?

Virginia

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