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    • NC_Palm_Enthusiast
      By NC_Palm_Enthusiast
      I live right on the 7a/7b line in the western piedmont of NC and I'm looking for some new palms to try. Currently, I have three Sabal Minor var. Louisianas and three potted majesty palms. The majesty palms have grown to be quite large and I'm worried I won't be able to fit them inside next winter. I'd like to replace them with some palms (other than Sabal Minor) that are hardy to my zone and can be planted directly into the ground.  I'm relatively new to palm cultivation so any tips would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
    • PalmTreeDude
      By PalmTreeDude
      Does anyone know if this is a Eucalyptus neglecta? I bought it as Eucalyptus neglecta 'Big O' from a place called Soutgern Eucs, but am not sure if that is what it is, since I looked it up online and in the pictures I found they seem to be a bit different. Could it be a different species? 




    • Manalto
      By Manalto
      I'm not at the house at the moment but my neighbor sent me this photo of my mule palm that has been in the ground about a year. I guess it had blown over in the wind. He staked it for me.
      I noticed, the last time I was there and working in the yard, that it was wobbly. It's in the shade  in the early morning  but  gets full sun for the rest of the day. Are they known for having weak root systems? Any suggestions?

    • SEVA
      By SEVA
      After doing some recent exploring in various areas around southeast Virginia, I've noticed many different forms of live oak.  They range from very small shrubs directly on the coast to large trees as you travel inland.  Since southern live oak reaches it's northernmost limit in southeast Virginia, I thought it'd be interesting to document some of my findings.  Most of the photos that I will be sharing soon are from parts of Virginia Beach that are lesser known to those who visit.
    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      For sale is the total 2019 crop from my Sabal bermudana: 60+ seeds. I grew my mother palm from seeds I received from a resident of Bermuda in 2008. This rare, very slow growing native of Bermuda is endangered on that tiny island by development. It is shorter - up to 20' tall -  and stockier than S. palmetto but just as cold hardy. It prefers sun and heat but unlike most Sabals, can prosper in areas with cooler summers, i.e., CA, PNW. 
      Sabal bermudana: 60+ seeds @ $15.00 for the lot. One Lot Only
      Shipping: $5.00 in padded envelope. No shipping outside the US. No shipping to HI
      Total = $20.00
      Payment via Paypal. PM me if you are interested
      Photos

      Mother palm

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