Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
TedNoah1

Spindle Palm possible infection

Recommended Posts

TedNoah1

 

Good morning!

 

I’m hoping someone can help!

My mother’s spindle appears to have a possible fungus or rot issue. The upper bark is soft when pressing with finger (the area that sheds). In addition to what appears to be spores/fungus, (which are a brown and very dark brown color), there’s also a small amount of a white powdery-type substance along the bark.

I hope the pictures are angled in the positions that showcase it properly .  I’d be happy to directly send  others if needed, the forum is only allowing 2 :-(

I added some more in the comments section.66AA33AE-0FF5-4BE1-81D7-3BFA651EDE57.thumb.jpeg.307ec0db26c3f4d261930e747a10951e.jpeg

3111717E-6BCC-4D92-9D34-F87E34BA458D.jpeg

Edited by TedNoah1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palmsOrl

If this were my palm, I would start giving it systemic fungicide treatments right away.  Propiconazole is one option.  Phyton is also excellent and strong but very expensive.  It also has action against pathogenic bacteria.

Edited by palmsOrl
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merlyn

I agree, and Banrot is another systemic fungicide option.

The blue-green-white crusty stuff at the base of the trunk looks like a lichen.  I'm not aware of that being a problem, but the big hole in the base of the trunk looks like a major problem.  At least it looks like a hole.  I have no idea how to fix that, maybe the spray-on pruning sealer?  That might make it worse if you seal moisture and rot inside without curing that first.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

Welcome to the forum @TedNoah1!  Hope the recommended treatment keeps your nice-looking palm around for a while.  I wouldn't fill in the hole personally.  Seems like it makes the issue worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TedNoah1

Thank you , @kinzyjr , @Merlyn2220 And @palmsOrl! I will be passing on your information to her. I also should’ve added in the initial post, I reached out to Florida University. Had a very nice response from one of the professors. He mentioned he believed it was nutrient deficient, suspected potassium deficient, especially. He also mentioned the trunk (where the hole is) is severely  sunburned?  Thoughts on these items, friends?   I have asked him some more questions but have not heard back yet. 

 

Update - I peeled the upper bark off and discovered another flower pod and the bulk of the trunk bark is fine - no spots.  Upper , near crown is the worst. See photos.

4EEF59A6-91B6-4276-9234-8E655100DD7E.jpeg

5B71B1AE-5C7E-4997-9723-207CAC1D214E.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palmsOrl

Spindle palms are known heavy feeders.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TedNoah1

So that means often fertilizing? She only does it about every 3 mos?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr
38 minutes ago, TedNoah1 said:

So that means often fertilizing? She only does it about every 3 mos?

Fertilize often and correctly.  Once every three months is probably often enough.  Do you know which kind is used and the nutrient profile of the fertilizer?  Here in Florida, it is probably best to use a slow release that is temperature activated rather than moisture activated.  The two most common brands I see mentioned by those of us in Florida are PalmGain and Florikan. 

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Merlyn

I'd agree with the potassium deficiency, that usually shows up as yellowed ends of leaves on the oldest fronds.  It also shows as yellow-orange spots or dead spots on leaves, generally also near the tips of older fronds.  It doesn't look like a severe deficiency, since the vast majority of the leaves are green.  But based on the curly leaves it might be a bit deficient in either (or both) manganese and boron.  Make sure your fertilizer has the micronutrients like magnesium, iron, manganese and boron.

The squishy feeling near the base of each petiole seems like it has to be some kind of fungus or rot.  There's no avoiding overhead rainfall, but hopefully she isn't watering the top, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • Patrick
      By Patrick
      Over the weekend I chose to cut down a queen that had been growing with the arcing spear/ leaning palm syndrome for a few years now. I thought it was a Boron deficiency as I've read, but I never did any soil testing. I was chopping along and everything looked good until I had about 15" of trunk left off the ground- and then I found something.  A brown ring, and it was rotten in the darkest part. I could push my finger into it.


    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      One of my Dypsis pembana is a clump planted near an Aloidendron "Hercules".  A while back the Aloidendron had quite a bit of black mold on it, not too unusual for me to get in the spring when marine layers persist along the coastline.  When we finally got a nice clear dry and hot day, I decided to blast off the mold with the hose and a high pressure nozzle.  Apparently some of that black mold washed into the crownshaft of the tallest and closest trunk of my clump of Dypsis pembana.  I noticed the next emerging leaf appeared stunted, but I didn't do anything.  Fast forward about 18 months and the last healthy leaf base came off in December exposing what was going on underneath.  While there are new leaves and it is struggling to progress, its fate is sealed with the rotten constricted trunk.  I think there are at least 4 other trunks growing right now in the clump, so I will only lose what used to be the tallest in the group.  While Dypsis pembana is fast, the Aloidendron has exceeded the palms growth.  Both were planted in late 2010, the Dypsis pembana from a 7 gallon and the Aloidendron from a 1 gallon.
      My only dilemma is whether to take that trunk from the base, the top, or just wait for it to topple in some wind event.  What would you do if it were in your garden?




×
×
  • Create New...