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Rickybobby

My indoor container ranch has transitioned outdoors

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Rickybobby

This is year 2 for me doing an indoor ranch. Last year I kept everything Indoors. This year I have in vested in a folding table that I can put in the shed in fall. So anyway here is my palms minus trachycarpus which are still inside and my (picks) are in decorative pots by the pool. The spot has been chosen for a few reasons. Eh it’s on the east side of the house in a courtyard. So it’s sheltered from the strong west winds here. Also it will get some sun from 10am till mid aft and give them shade as well. But I’m hoping the heat will be good we had a bad cold wet spring but now we are good into summer. 80s everyday and I hope to get them to take off more now than they were indoors. Indoors was warm but that hot sun hitting the soil is obviously way stronger 

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Rickybobby

If germination goes well indoors in my station I should be adding a few hundred more to this collection. If anyone lives in southern. Ontario pop by for a palm. A date palm went home to Windsor ontario last night 

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Rickybobby

Added my trachys might as well. Now my indoor room can be shutdown. Save some hydro and clean it up 

F5D2866D-81D7-430E-8261-3A845C27B2EA.jpeg

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Chester B

I found the palms grew significantly faster outside in the summer even when neglected.  The warm nights and all the humidity they seemed to love.  Personally I wouldn't bother putting them on that table.  Just as fine on the ground and less risk of being blown off the table.  Wouldn't want a bad storm to hit while you're out.

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Rickybobby
7 minutes ago, Chester B said:

I found the palms grew significantly faster outside in the summer even when neglected.  The warm nights and all the humidity they seemed to love.  Personally I wouldn't bother putting them on that table.  Just as fine on the ground and less risk of being blown off the table.  Wouldn't want a bad storm to hit while you're out.

We will see about the storms. There in a courtyard and very protected. But I wanted them on a table because it’s easy on my back and also help to keep critters away 

hopefully it works ok. If not on the ground they go

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Rickybobby

And agree again. The very high temps. Humidity and the fact the sun cooks the pots should really get them rocking and rolling this summer. This is my first time bringing the whole ranch outside so we shall see. Temps here are now 28-30c

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Chester B

Before I moved to the US, I spent the last 2 years up in Erin on a house in the country with acreage at high elevation (>1300 feet).  Much, much colder up there and very little humidity with cool/cold nights.  Most summer nights would dip down in the high single digits. In the 2 summers I was up there we ran the AC maybe 3 or 4 days only.  Quite the shock moving from Oakville right on the lake.  Previous to that Toronto, Burlington, St. Catharines and London.   Needless to say I was glad to leave.  At the time I gave my Dad a couple of Chaemerops seedlings and he was living in Hamilton at the time.  By the end of summer his were twice the size of mine, and he has a black thumb.  If I remember correctly you are located in Paris so you should see some substantial growth.  If I were you I'd be getting some Sabal minors and needle palms and getting them into the ground.  I think with minimal winter protection they'd do well.  I have seen palms in Niagara region as well as Burlington.

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Rickybobby
3 hours ago, Chester B said:

Before I moved to the US, I spent the last 2 years up in Erin on a house in the country with acreage at high elevation (>1300 feet).  Much, much colder up there and very little humidity with cool/cold nights.  Most summer nights would dip down in the high single digits. In the 2 summers I was up there we ran the AC maybe 3 or 4 days only.  Quite the shock moving from Oakville right on the lake.  Previous to that Toronto, Burlington, St. Catharines and London.   Needless to say I was glad to leave.  At the time I gave my Dad a couple of Chaemerops seedlings and he was living in Hamilton at the time.  By the end of summer his were twice the size of mine, and he has a black thumb.  If I remember correctly you are located in Paris so you should see some substantial growth.  If I were you I'd be getting some Sabal minors and needle palms and getting them into the ground.  I think with minimal winter protection they'd do well.  I have seen palms in Niagara region as well as Burlington.

I’m in rural Scotland Ontario south of Paris yes sabal minor needle abs trachys do fine here with protection and as you know it’s gets very hot here and actually in the spring I’m hotter than the golden. Horseshoe because Lake Ontario keeps everything so cold for quite a while. You will see 30c here and 20c in Burlington 

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Rickybobby
3 hours ago, Chester B said:

Before I moved to the US, I spent the last 2 years up in Erin on a house in the country with acreage at high elevation (>1300 feet).  Much, much colder up there and very little humidity with cool/cold nights.  Most summer nights would dip down in the high single digits. In the 2 summers I was up there we ran the AC maybe 3 or 4 days only.  Quite the shock moving from Oakville right on the lake.  Previous to that Toronto, Burlington, St. Catharines and London.   Needless to say I was glad to leave.  At the time I gave my Dad a couple of Chaemerops seedlings and he was living in Hamilton at the time.  By the end of summer his were twice the size of mine, and he has a black thumb.  If I remember correctly you are located in Paris so you should see some substantial growth.  If I were you I'd be getting some Sabal minors and needle palms and getting them into the ground.  I think with minimal winter protection they'd do well.  I have seen palms in Niagara region as well as Burlington.

Oh i forgot. I have sabals and sabal minors that I’ve grown from seed. Maybe I will throw one in the ground when they are bigger. 

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Chester B

Not sure if you know the place Rice Road Greenhouses.  It's in Pelham and they carry a lot of cold hardy tropicals there, so if you wanted something larger they could very well have it.  I used to buy from them when I lived in Ontario.  They have some pretty big plants there, especially the Yucca rostratas.

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RJ

I always get a kick of you guys way up north growing palms. When I lived in Northern New England (about 20 shy of the 45th parallel) I was a cold 5a. Only reason for that was close proximity to a large body of water that some years would freeze but most years wouldn't. When it would freeze all bets where off but I went to work at -25F on several occasions. Growing palms for me was never even in the books. I gotta say kudos for you growing palms, either indoors or outdoors. :greenthumb:

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Rickybobby
46 minutes ago, RJ said:

I always get a kick of you guys way up north growing palms. When I lived in Northern New England (about 20 shy of the 45th parallel) I was a cold 5a. Only reason for that was close proximity to a large body of water that some years would freeze but most years wouldn't. When it would freeze all bets where off but I went to work at -25F on several occasions. Growing palms for me was never even in the books. I gotta say kudos for you growing palms, either indoors or outdoors. :greenthumb:

Thanks it’s not really that difficult 

with room money and a lot of experience it works out well. In saying that even though some of these plans could monsters. The months they are indoors helps for me to enjoy them longer. 

I’ve experimented with lights. Soil mixes temps you name it. And slowly I’m getting f there. It will be fun to post in a few years. I also will sell some and I give them away all the time as gifts 

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Chester B
13 hours ago, RJ said:

I always get a kick of you guys way up north growing palms. When I lived in Northern New England (about 20 shy of the 45th parallel) I was a cold 5a.

It's a lot warmer than you think.  Many areas of South and South Western Ontario are 6B, with some places 7A.  The Great lakes have a substantial moderating effect.

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RJ
47 minutes ago, Chester B said:

It's a lot warmer than you think.  Many areas of South and South Western Ontario are 6B, with some places 7A.  The Great lakes have a substantial moderating effect.

Yes I know. My brother used to live in Michigan, out on the peninsula. I was amazed how the lakes moderated his temps. I just never enjoyed anything like that. It certainly would of made living up north more bearable, other then the lack of light during the winter months. :rage: I went to work when it was dark and returned when it was dark during December/January. No fun. Now living in the carolina's even in the dead of winter I get substantially more light.  

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Rickybobby

We snowmobile and enjoy the snow it’s nice. It’s the transition months like November and March that are cold and wet 

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Chester B
1 hour ago, RJ said:

I went to work when it was dark and returned when it was dark during December/January. No fun. Now living in the carolina's even in the dead of winter I get substantially more light.  

Believe it or not where I'm from in Canada is 3 hours south of where I live now in Oregon if you draw a straight line across.  Winter days are about 15 minutes shorter here.  Dec 21 sunset is at 4:29 pm.

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