Jump to content
Shiveringtropicals

Sabal minor 'cherokee'

Recommended Posts

Shiveringtropicals

I got these seeds from Rarepalmseeds a couple of months ago and they have finaly began sprouting.

Anyone confirmed if they are as cold tolerant as rps says? on the site they where supposed to be able to take -22°C / -8°F but that could be in dry climates only.

The only palm i have germinated before was Washingtonia robusta but for me most of them died during winter at -6°C 21°F.

We can get fairly wet winters here so any advice or tips would be greatly appreciated. Has anyone else germinated these or similar varieties what were your results?

DSC03483.thumb.JPG.50b2b60fb78dbc8a862a7b300a016c32.JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

@Shiveringtropicals This variety is from the Weiss Lake area in Cherokee county (northern Alabama.  This locale is considered zone 7b (half a zone lower than McCurtain).  I have a few of these growing here, but their hardiness will not be tested by my climate at all.

Here are the climate averages and records in the area:

201906161430_CedarBluff_AL.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shiveringtropicals
54 minutes ago, kinzyjr said:

@Shiveringtropicals This variety is from the Weiss Lake area in Cherokee county (northern Alabama.  This locale is considered zone 7b (half a zone lower than McCurtain).  I have a few of these growing here, but their hardiness will not be tested by my climate at all.

Here are the climate averages and records in the area:

201906161430_CedarBluff_AL.png

thanks for the info. Looking at this graph they should definitely be able to grow in my climate.

The average precipitation is higher then in my area and average low is similar to mine so its looking pretty good for these palms.:yay:

Now i just have to wait for them to get bigger, i hope they have a decent growth rate here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Your biggest issue is not your ultimate low but how much sun and heat your seedlings receive in Summer, i.e., the more the better. Sabals need sunny, hot and humid summers to enable them to survive cold winters. They will also grow faster in hot summers. Cherokee is supposedly now the cold hardiest Sabal minor. Washingtonias are wimps compared to Sabal minor.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmTreeDude

I have some seeds sitting in a community pot, none germinated yet, but it's good to hear that after a few months yours germinated, it gives me hope. 

Edited by PalmTreeDude

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shiveringtropicals

2 week later they seem to be growing well, we've had a couple of hot days and they really seem to like it.

Other than some bird taking of with 2 seedlings i've not had any problems yet. 

Also none of the remaining seed germinated, they all came up within 2 weeks and then stopped (no worries i got 88 now):lol:.

DSC03493.thumb.JPG.306c7b4fc6aa802cacfb08e2acc0fd4a.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Good work. Your seedlings will love the heat wave you are having.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Steve in Florida

I witnessed the devastation that -11F did to palms across North Alabama in January of 1985.  Sabal minor burnt to the ground and took up to two years in shady areas to regenerate new leaves above ground.  I also saw a single non-trunking palmetto do the same thing.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
palmsOrl

Steve, I would be interested in reading more details of said event or even photos if you have them.   -11F would certainly kill any arborescent palms like Sabal palmetto and most Trachycarpus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OC2Texaspalmlvr
13 hours ago, Steve in Florida said:

I witnessed the devastation that -11F did to palms across North Alabama in January of 1985.  Sabal minor burnt to the ground and took up to two years in shady areas to regenerate new leaves above ground.  I also saw a single non-trunking palmetto do the same thing.

-11F and the palms actually still made a comeback is rather impressive right. At that temp i figured there isnt a palm out there that could survive. Myself included haha 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Steve in Florida
13 hours ago, palmsOrl said:

Steve, I would be interested in reading more details of said event or even photos if you have them.   -11F would certainly kill any arborescent palms like Sabal palmetto and most Trachycarpus.

I didn't take any pics of the burnt palms because it was too cold and I didn't want to waste money on having depressing photos printed.  The palmetto was planted as a two gallon or trade three gallon with half a dozen fan leaves in September or October in 1978.  It defoliated in January of 1982 and regrew.  It defoliated and regrew again in 1984.  After January 1985 I thought the cold was too much for it because it took twice as long to regrow above ground.  This time it grew to six feet tall when it was only 4-4-5 feet two years earlier.  I took a pic of it a few years later when it was about eight feet tall.    

DVC00075.JPG

  • Like 4
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shiveringtropicals

Here's on update on the seedlings.

They continued growing throughout the summer albeit rather slowly.

It looks like they like hotter summers than we have here, atleast none of them died.

I'm now storing them under a shelter alongside with my agave's and other wet sensitive plants to prevent them from getting to wet and maybe getting root rot.

I hope they can take a bit of shade as the dark gloomy winter months are now upon us.

DSC03563.thumb.JPG.2e31a37292ca5c3bcafc34f67fdc73b5.JPG

DSC03555.thumb.JPG.dcbd388467356d2bccdc886cd6b5c6fa.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Manalto
On 6/16/2019 at 3:38 PM, PalmatierMeg said:

Your biggest issue is not your ultimate low but how much sun and heat your seedlings receive in Summer, i.e., the more the better. Sabals need sunny, hot and humid summers to enable them to survive cold winters. They will also grow faster in hot summers. Cherokee is supposedly now the cold hardiest Sabal minor. Washingtonias are wimps compared to Sabal minor.

Meg, I'm pretty new here so I'm just beginning to recognize the people behind the names but I have to say what a lot of people here probably already know - it's always a delight to see your comments. They're informative, helpful and interesting. One of these nights I'm just going to sit and read through the comments you've made on this forum. Many thanks for your contributions.

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Thanks for the kind words. Eleven years ago I was ignorant. I owe what I know to this forum, study and personal experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bigfish
On 6/16/2019 at 2:18 PM, Shiveringtropicals said:

I got these seeds from Rarepalmseeds a couple of months ago and they have finaly began sprouting.

Anyone confirmed if they are as cold tolerant as rps says? on the site they where supposed to be able to take -22°C / -8°F but that could be in dry climates only.

The only palm i have germinated before was Washingtonia robusta but for me most of them died during winter at -6°C 21°F.

We can get fairly wet winters here so any advice or tips would be greatly appreciated. Has anyone else germinated these or similar varieties what were your results?

DSC03483.thumb.JPG.50b2b60fb78dbc8a862a7b300a016c32.JPG

That’s great!  I can confirm the -8°F temperature, because that was the actual temperature recorded from the closest weather station to those palms (January 1985).  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
kinzyjr

There are some cold hardiness observations for Sabal minor from various forum members here: https://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/17218-sabal-minor/

The ecotypes from Oklahoma, Arkansas and Alabama are certainly hardy below 0F in hot summer climates once they are established.  See @Steve in Florida's post above regarding the -11F freeze in 1985.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Similar Content

    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      My Sabal minor Emerald Isle Giant has produced a crop of 250 seeds this year. For info on this beautiful NC native Sabal minor check out link below from last year:
      https://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/58162-sabal-minor-emerald-isle-giant-wseeds-any-interest/&tab=comments#comment-868587
      I am selling this year's crop as follows:
      Sabal minor Emerald Isle Giant seeds: 50 @ $10.00
      Shipping: $5.00 in padded envelope. No shipping outside the US. No shipping to HI
      Total = $15.00
      Payment via Paypal. Pm me if you are interested.
      Photos

      Mother palm

    • PalmTreeDude
      By PalmTreeDude
      The Sabal minor population in and around Congaree National Park, which is just Southeast of Columbia, South Carolina, look really cool. They have basically 360° fronds that stick kind of upright. Look at this observation of them that I saw on iNaturalist in their habitat. I would recommend looking around the observation map as well, you can literally see the different ecotypes around the Southeast. 
       https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/10726721
    • Hillizard
      By Hillizard
      An Unflinching Look, a documentary photo series by Benjamin Dimmitt, is set in Florida and focuses its gaze on rising sea levels. Dimmitt has been photographing in the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge north of Tampa since 2004, after an initial visit more than 30 years ago. https://www.thisiscolossal.com/2019/10/an-unflinching-look/
       
       

    • PalmatierMeg
      By PalmatierMeg
      I have a group of 12 seedlings from this rare, endangered blue Sabal minor from Emerald Isle, NC. Refer to topic below for info about this Sabal variety:
      https://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/58162-sabal-minor-emerald-isle-giant-wseeds-any-interest/&tab=comments#comment-868587
      Seedlings for sale were germinated from the last of the 2018 crop of seeds and are the only ones I have. I haven't harvested and tested this year's crop yet. If you collect varieties of Sabal minor don't let this beautiful palm get away.
      Sabal minor Emerald Isle Giant Seedlings: 12 = $20.00 for the lot.
      Shipping = $10.00  Seedlings will be sent without pots and soil with roots wrapped in damp orchid moss, clear wrap and foil
      Total - $30.00
      Payment via Paypal
      No shipping outside the US. No shipping to HI. PM me if you are interested
      Photos

      Mother palm

×