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Palm crazy

Anyone try these Super cold Hardy Mules?

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Palm crazy
1 hour ago, Trustandi said:

@Palm crazy that is a good price for the 1g. How much is the last year ones? Where to order them from?

I did not get a price for the 1gallons since they were not totally rooted in the pot yet. Last years seedlings are $15.00 each, I was quoted for 4 seedlings plus shipping would be $86.00. shipping for me was 25.00.  Really good deal. 

1 hour ago, Steve in Florida said:

I had the great opportunity to visit with Merrill before he passed, and his son, and they said their hybrid palm did not like temperatures below 19-20F due to it's Syagrus genes.

I have one of Merrill mule palm and with protection and overhead canopy mine has gone through 15F a few times, its also in a good microclimate so maybe more like 18F.  depending on Age is how cold mules palms can take. The one I have in the ground is BxS.  even with protection, I did have spear pull at 16F a few years ago, but like I said it could have been warmer in its microclimate location.  But planted out if the open below 20F would be really bad. 

Edited by Palm crazy

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Palm crazy
1 hour ago, Trustandi said:

@Palm crazy that is a good price for the 1g. How much is the last year ones? Where to order them from?

From Moultrie Palms In Florida... (904) 794- 1363

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Palm crazy
1 hour ago, Swolte said:

These are the two "supermules" from Moultrie Palms which, according to the owners, are: (B xJ) xB)  xS). 

The first image is the one close to the house. Upon planting in the Spring of 2018 it had a 3" trunk diameter and it was about 3' tall. By January 2019, it was 5.5"/4' and today it stands at 8"(!!)/5'.  It looks better in real life than in the picture! 

The second image is the one that went through all the punishment described earlier and I was surprised it even survived. In the spring of 2018 it was 3"/3', by January 2019 it was 3.5"/3', and today it is 4"/3'. As you can see, I mounded it up with better draining soil. Although this one is still in an non-irrigated spot, I am currently spoiling it back to life.

JBS_1.jpg

JBS_2.jpg

So if I understand this right it really only has about 1/4% Jubaea in it but 50% Syagrus?

Edited by Palm crazy

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

 

18 minutes ago, Palm crazy said:

So if I understand this right it really only has about 1/4% Jubaea in it but 50% Syagrus

I'm not even sure how the math works, there could be even less Jubaea then that. I'm with you wish there was more Jubaea gene is this palm

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Trustandi

Thank you @Palm crazy

I am thinking that maybe @Ben in Norcal  is better since it  is (bxj) x (bxs) less Syagrus trait and more jubaea? 

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OC2Texaspalmlvr
26 minutes ago, Trustandi said:

Thank you @Palm crazy

I am thinking that maybe @Ben in Norcal  is better since it  is (bxj) x (bxs) less Syagrus trait and more jubaea? 

I think your absolutely right in that fact. Ben has a pretty comprehensive hybrid selection and a direct Line to Patrick experiments =)

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Palm crazy

Yeah for our area Ben's palm would be better... (BXJ) x (BXS).  

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Chester B

Although the genetic transfer between parents isn't an exact percentage, if you treated it that way to keep it simple you're looking at:

37.5% Butia, 12.5% Jubea and 50% Syagrus.

I don't see these being all that hardy below 9a.

That being said, the only way to prove or disprove this is to try them out in a colder zone.

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Swolte
15 hours ago, Chester B said:

Although the genetic transfer between parents isn't an exact percentage, if you treated it that way to keep it simple you're looking at:

37.5% Butia, 12.5% Jubea and 50% Syagrus.

I don't see these being all that hardy below 9a.

That being said, the only way to prove or disprove this is to try them out in a colder zone.

Yes, true. The fast growth rate also seems to confirm the 50% Syagrus (and they look like regular mules). I am not expecting them to be very different from regular mules and I am skeptical of the claims by Moultrie Palms about them possibly surviving single digits. But yeah, you never know if you don't try. I'll keep you all posted as to how mine fare in 8b Central Texas. They haven't really been through a tough winter yet!

Edited by Swolte

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Fusca
15 hours ago, Chester B said:

That being said, the only way to prove or disprove this is to try them out in a colder zone.

This.  I've read where the hybrid (can't remember off hand which one) is more cold hardy than either parent which isn't logical but still happens.  But regular mules are so variable in appearance (and possibly cold hardiness) it must be a crap shoot to get an especially hardy "super mule" if that were even possible.  The marketing claim of cold hardiness might be based on performance of one in a thousand if it's based on any data at all.

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Chester B
25 minutes ago, Fusca said:

This.  I've read where the hybrid (can't remember off hand which one) is more cold hardy than either parent which isn't logical but still happens.  But regular mules are so variable in appearance (and possibly cold hardiness) it must be a crap shoot to get an especially hardy "super mule" if that were even possible.  The marketing claim of cold hardiness might be based on performance of one in a thousand if it's based on any data at all.

Hybrid vigor is the term that is used.  Just because something is a hybrid doesn't automatically mean it has an advantage, it may even have a disadvantage.  I think your second point is completely valid as well.  It would be nice to get feedback here from different areas of the country where people have purchased.  Swolte lives in 8B just like me, but they are totally different.  He can grow a wider variety of palms than me due to my extended cool wet weather for 4-5 months of the year.  It doesn't get cold enough to kill Brahea's or Washingtonia's here but the winter moisture will eventually take them out.

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Palm crazy

Hey Y'all, I just found a photo of my BxJXS from 2012, I bought the mule palm in 2010. Here's a picture of it after being three years in the ground.  If you like to read more about mule palms back then do a PT search under the tile:    let's talk about Patrick Schafer's X Breeds....

DSC00006-2-1.jpg

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Love them palms
On 6/6/2019 at 10:28 AM, Palm crazy said:

Hey all you PNW gardeners if anyone would like to go together on an order of the super cold mules PM and I will give you a price. Shipping is the same for one palm as for four palms.  I am looking at ordering early July.  The One gallons are not ready right now but extra large tree pot seedlings are ready and these are from last years batch so they will be ready to go into 3-gallon pots.  PM if interested and for price. Prices are good. 

I ordered 5 in March as liners ,I put 2 in the ground, 2 in pots,gave away 1.they are now just snapping out of shock.

Edited by Love them palms
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Joe NC

Here is mine, 2 gal watering can for scale.  Purchased as a strap seedling in June 2016, from Penny's palms via a Florida source. Went in the ground the following year.  Gets Christmas lights, thermo cube, and covered each winter during anything below 20 F.  Has had damage or partial spear pull every year (even when it was in a pot for the first winter and was brought inside for anything below 34).  Isn't as fast as the other 2 mules I have grown from seedlings.  Also is a bit more squat, kind of like a green flimsy leaf pindo?  The older leaves tend to get black spots.20190623_103051.thumb.jpg.197405b34e63708f28628076dad47594.jpg

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RJ
4 hours ago, Joe NC said:

Here is mine, 2 gal watering can for scale.  Purchased as a strap seedling in June 2016, from Penny's palms via a Florida source. Went in the ground the following year.  Gets Christmas lights, thermo cube, and covered each winter during anything below 20 F.  Has had damage or partial spear pull every year (even when it was in a pot for the first winter and was brought inside for anything below 34).  Isn't as fast as the other 2 mules I have grown from seedlings.  Also is a bit more squat, kind of like a green flimsy leaf pindo?  The older leaves tend to get black spots.

You planted that out pretty small. Kudo's. In your location would you protect a pindo that size? 

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Joe NC
40 minutes ago, RJ said:

You planted that out pretty small. Kudo's. In your location would you protect a pindo that size? 

Yes I would need to.  I'm down to one pindo after the awful Jan 2018 freeze.  It seems like any butia at any size is a gamble in my heavy clay soil in 8a. I've had a 7foot overall height one die in the summer due to some sort of funk associated with the wet, and getting them established from the 3gal blue pot specials has been tough.  At least with non palms, the smaller I can plant something out, the better chance it has.  That way it can put it's roots out in the 6 to 12 inches of topsoil I have before hitting clay.  Digging a hole any more deep than a 3 gal pot seems to just make a poorly drained pit into the clay where the rootball in potting media sits.  I know the mules will not be long term, but they are much more user friendly to protect than a marginal washy washy or Phoenix. 

Edited by Joe NC
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Tropicdoc
On 6/23/2019 at 9:57 AM, Joe NC said:

Here is mine, 2 gal watering can for scale.  Purchased as a strap seedling in June 2016, from Penny's palms via a Florida source. Went in the ground the following year.  Gets Christmas lights, thermo cube, and covered each winter during anything below 20 F.  Has had damage or partial spear pull every year (even when it was in a pot for the first winter and was brought inside for anything below 34).  Isn't as fast as the other 2 mules I have grown from seedlings.  Also is a bit more squat, kind of like a green flimsy leaf pindo?  The older leaves tend to get black spots.20190623_103051.thumb.jpg.197405b34e63708f28628076dad47594.jpg

I have 2 bxjxq and they get black spots too. Not sure if it’s the jubaea blood or what

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Chester B

I have a straight Butia and it gets the spots too from our cool, wet winters.

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