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SilverDragon

Mexican Giant Dioon (Dioon spinulosa) seed care

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SilverDragon

I received three giant dioon seeds from Seedman.com today, how do I properly germinate them? Do I soak them like palm seeds? They are massive, like the size of small eggs, and I hear rattling inside when I shake them.

Edited by SilverDragon
Clarification of species name

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CharltonEJ10

This is what works for me. Soak seeds in water for 2 days. Place sideways on damp pumice, at a temperature between 28-35 degrees celsius. Once seeds germinate pot them up in pumice.

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SilverDragon
23 minutes ago, CharltonEJ10 said:

This is what works for me. Soak seeds in water for 2 days. Place sideways on damp pumice, at a temperature between 28-35 degrees celsius. Once seeds germinate pot them up in pumice.

Thanks!

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TropiLocal

Did they float or sink initially?  And what about after their soak?  I don't like being the negative one, but usually rattling isn't a good sign. It doesn't mean they aren't viable, but their chances are better if the interior parts haven't separated from the exterior shell.  I think it means they were allowed to dry, but could be incorrect.  Sorry for the poor terminology.   Again, not trying to be a downer, just trying to help understand if germination doesn't work out. 

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SilverDragon

I started soaking them this morning and they all initially floated. So far, however, one has sank to the bottom of the cup they're in.

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