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SilverDragon

Coconuts and Adonidias in NE Ohio Garden Center

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SilverDragon

It pains me to know that who ever buys these will probably throw them out when they die in the fall and winter...unless they somehow have space indoors??

IMG_20190516_140040.jpg

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PalmatierMeg

More and more people in colder climates buy these tropical palms and treat them as annuals. While they may be expensive on the retail end, they are cheap as dirt in FL where they are shipped en masse to garden centers & nurseries up north. Gives a new meaning to "disposable." Those in your photo are already almost as tall as most homes' ceilings and will be toast on the first frosty morning.

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SilverDragon
8 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

More and more people in colder climates buy these tropical palms and treat them as annuals. While they may be expensive on the retail end, they are cheap as dirt in FL where they are shipped en masse to garden centers & nurseries up north. Gives a new meaning to "disposable." Those in your photo are already almost as tall as most homes' ceilings and will be toast on the first frosty morning.

It's like a punch in the gut seeing such beautiful palms be doomed...I would kill to have a coconut and these people throw them away lol.

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PalmatierMeg

No argument. Chalk it up to people with more money than brains opting for conspicuous consumption.

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Rickybobby

Well I am one of those people who grow or purchase these awesome plants and do everything I can to keep them going year after year 

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HtownPalms

It is a shame to know what their fate is going to be. It's not much different here. People buy tropical plants in Houston knowing that they will eventually die in the next big cold snap. The only difference for us is the next big cold snap might not be for a few years. 

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SilverDragon
57 minutes ago, Rickybobby said:

Well I am one of those people who grow or purchase these awesome plants and do everything I can to keep them going year after year 

You and me both. Just trying to keep things alive but small until I move to SW Florida someday.

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