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djcary

Trachys @ Plant Delights/Juniper Level Botanic Garden

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djcary

A couple weekends ago I went to Plant Delights (just a bit south of Raleigh NC) during their open nursery day and, of course, had to check out their palms they have at their garden. So, I took some pictures and I figured I share some of them.

They had quite a few different ecotypes of Trachys,  but I won't bother posting those, as they all looked the same to me. Also, they had plenty of Sabals too: S. 'Birmingham',  S. minor 'Savannah Silver' (which I hadn't heard of before), S. minor 'McCurtain', S. 'brazoriensis', S. palmetto 'Bald Head Island' (wasn't trunking yet), S. minor 'Louisiana',  S. minor 'Emerald Isle Giant', S. minor 'Wakula Dwarf', and I think a S. etonia, I didn't see a name plate on it though.

 

Trachycarpus fortunei 'Nanital' was definitely the best looker there, at least in my eyes.

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A couple of Trachys weren't looking good. Based off of this pic, I don't think T. takil can survive here long term. I think there was also one in the JC Raulston arboretum that has died too, but I might be wrong about that. This waggie doesn't look too good either, but I think part of that is because it was placed next to the water and maybe that doesn't like that in the winter time.

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The palm I was most excited about when I saw it was T. nanus. It looks like its doing fine here and has lived long enough to start flowering.

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djcary

Yeah, here's a few. I was expecting the Emerald Isle Giant to have more of blue color to it, based on the picture they have on their website. However, it seems to be in a lot of shade so maybe that's why. 

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Allen

That Sabal Savannah Silver is so nice.  Never heard of it.

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Steve in Florida

Thanks for posting the pics.  I believe the palms that went into decline were heavily shaded and thus suffered from prolonged periods of below freezing temperatures.

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NCpalmqueen

I bet I was at PDN the same time you were there, djcary.  I assume you live in Cary?   I think I have tried all of those palms in your list except some of those specific ecotypes of sabals when I lived in Green Level.  I moved west out to Siler City.  Cary has a nice microclimate for palm pushing.     That takil has been dead for awhile....I keep forgetting to ask Tony the real reason.   I had an Emerald Isle giant that grew fast and furious.   Unfortunately Sabals don't like to be transplanted, so I had to leave all of them when we moved.  What types of palms are you growing?  

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djcary
8 hours ago, Steve in Florida said:

Thanks for posting the pics.  I believe the palms that went into decline were heavily shaded and thus suffered from prolonged periods of below freezing temperatures.

Definitely could be factor, though, there were some fortunei's in a good amount of shade too and were fine.

 

1 hour ago, NCpalmqueen said:

I bet I was at PDN the same time you were there, djcary.  I assume you live in Cary?   I think I have tried all of those palms in your list except some of those specific ecotypes of sabals when I lived in Green Level.  I moved west out to Siler City.  Cary has a nice microclimate for palm pushing.     That takil has been dead for awhile....I keep forgetting to ask Tony the real reason.   I had an Emerald Isle giant that grew fast and furious.   Unfortunately Sabals don't like to be transplanted, so I had to leave all of them when we moved.  What types of palms are you growing?  

One would think, but my name is in no relation to the town haha. I do live in downtown Raleigh, though.

All my palms are in pots and I only have a balcony to grow on, so sadly I don't have as many as I wish I did. Right now, I've got a Chamaerops humilis, which was my first palm. It's about four years old from seed.  From Plant Delights, I've got a S. 'Tamaulipas', S. palmetto 'Mocksville', and then I just picked up an Emerald Isle Giant and an etonia. Also, I have some S. miamiensis seedlings. I'm excited to try those out in the ground... when I actually have some ground to plant them in. I feel like they have a chance at surviving here, though, I'd still protect some of them just in case it gets too cold for them. Recently, I picked up a Butia odorata too. I try to go with palms that can survive the winter here without me having to take them inside, except for the few nights when it gets into the low 20s or below.

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NC_Palms

I wonder what happened to that T. takil. Aren't those supposed to be hardier than T. fortunei? 

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Chester B
4 hours ago, NC_Palms said:

I wonder what happened to that T. takil. Aren't those supposed to be hardier than T. fortunei? 

I think that's what a lot of people expected.  In reality they don't seem to be.

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NCpalmqueen
8 hours ago, djcary said:

Definitely could be factor, though, there were some fortunei's in a good amount of shade too and were fine.

 

One would think, but my name is in no relation to the town haha. I do live in downtown Raleigh, though.

All my palms are in pots and I only have a balcony to grow on, so sadly I don't have as many as I wish I did. Right now, I've got a Chamaerops humilis, which was my first palm. It's about four years old from seed.  From Plant Delights, I've got a S. 'Tamaulipas', S. palmetto 'Mocksville', and then I just picked up an Emerald Isle Giant and an etonia. Also, I have some S. miamiensis seedlings. I'm excited to try those out in the ground... when I actually have some ground to plant them in. I feel like they have a chance at surviving here, though, I'd still protect some of them just in case it gets too cold for them. Recently, I picked up a Butia odorata too. I try to go with palms that can survive the winter here without me having to take them inside, except for the few nights when it gets into the low 20s or below.

Sounds like a great collection....all wanting a permanent home.   :-)  

Downtown Raleigh is at least a half zone warmer than my locale.   

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Xhevdet Elezaj

Hi,how are you? I read your message to the end,LUCKY YOU,for your beautiful Palms you've! please can you send me like GIFTS some MIXED  Palm seeds Varieties?

Sincerely:Gjevi Elezzaj!

From Country:Kosovo!

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Tropicdoc

Trachycarpus takil never thrived for me down here either. Too hot/humid? I threw it out. Trachy martianus is a winner for me in my climate and it looks nicer than fortunei.

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Chester B
2 hours ago, Tropicdoc said:

Trachycarpus takil never thrived for me down here either. Too hot/humid? I threw it out. Trachy martianus is a winner for me in my climate and it looks nicer than fortunei.

I agree.  My Takil spear pulled this last week, after a mild dry winter.  25F was the coldest it saw with no more than 4 hours below freezing and only about 4 nights where it dropped to freezing in total.  We'll see if it grows out of it.  Have been treating with peroxide.

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Cikas
On 5/16/2019 at 5:29 PM, NC_Palms said:

I wonder what happened to that T. takil. Aren't those supposed to be hardier than T. fortunei? 

They are not. In Northern Europe they are not as hardy as fortunei. They are proven to be a lot more sensitive. 

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Cikas
23 hours ago, Tropicdoc said:

Trachycarpus takil never thrived for me down here either. Too hot/humid? I threw it out. Trachy martianus is a winner for me in my climate and it looks nicer than fortunei.

You should try Trachycarpus latisectus also. It is native in much hoter climate than other species. And it is very beautiful. 

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Tropicdoc
43 minutes ago, Cikas said:

You should try Trachycarpus latisectus also. It is native in much hoter climate than other species. And it is very beautiful. 

Yes latisectus is on my list to plant thanks

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cm05
6 hours ago, Cikas said:

They are not. In Northern Europe they are not as hardy as fortunei. They are proven to be a lot more sensitive. 

Might be the strain, they should in theory be hardier than fortunei, or at least the same, T. takil grow at higher elevations in the Himalayas than T. fortunei.

They're also somewhat new in cultivation, T. takil only started becoming more popular over the last decade. Perhaps the weaker ones will be weeded out over time. T. fortunei has had a 100+ year head start in that process.

Edited by cm05

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Brad Mondel

Assuming a plant cannot survive based on the fact that one single specimen or so did not make it is kind of jumping the gun. I think more people should try it. 

Edited by Brad Mondel
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NC_Palms
2 hours ago, Brad Mondel said:

Assuming a plant cannot survive based on the fact that one single specimen or so did not make it is kind of jumping the gun. I think more people should try it. 

I agree. Palms can be quite variable  

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