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PalmatierMeg

Amorphophallus konjac Flower Opens

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PalmatierMeg

The aroid Amorphophallus is a genus of mostly tropical bulbs, aka voodoo lilies, notable for elaborate sometimes bizarre flowers, followed by a single stalked, branched palmlike leaf that lasts from spring to fall (dry season) here in SWFL. The most common voodoo lily is Amorphophallus konjac, the bulb of which is used in some OTC weight loss supplements. While the leaf is frost sensitive, the underground bulb can survive underground in zone 7/8. I keep all my voodoo lilies potted so they don't escape and become invasive. In the fall after the leaves die back, I unpot them, hose them off, sun dry them, coat with copper fungicide powder, then store them in bags or boxes in my garden shed over winter. The following spring I pot them up with a dose of bone meal and set them in partial shade. A. konjac bulbs begin flowering when the size of grapefruit, can reach up to 50 lbs in weight and offset readily. On April 30 I noticed my largest bulb (~5 lbs) sending up a flower. Over the course of a week I photographed it daily. Once the flower fully opened it lasted 1-2 days then started to die back. Then my bulb will send up its leaf. Here is the week-long lifespan of an A. konjac flower.

April 30

Amorphophallus_hooded_flower_01_04-30-19.thumb.JPG.22ed06835dbcb592b0a14e277cce2094.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_hooded_flower_02_04-30-19.thumb.JPG.b7614af0071bb502fc21251afc93b867.JPG

May 1

Amorphophallus_konjac_01_05-01-19.thumb.JPG.4ad4ea193b045acecb75f4ca8056251b.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_02_05-01-19.thumb.JPG.91f907219d756c7912ce5c0ed5502bc2.JPG

May 2

Amorphophallus_konjac_05_05-02-19.thumb.JPG.6389f90eb70b58a0f35937f1a158cc76.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_04_05-02-19.thumb.JPG.db986e07e609158ab9c39876b88e30bd.JPG

May 4

Amorphophallus_konjac_01_05-04-19.thumb.JPG.e6d83bffd685e4601dd2e16f45d2cd51.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_05_05-04-19.thumb.JPG.318a4361dce679651d09d00ca6db77f5.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_03_05-04-19.thumb.JPG.3873dfeab70c20f1dbc31164a1b60b30.JPG

May 5

Amorphophallus_konjac_05_05-05-19.thumb.JPG.d6a1657ea384dbd17a525261f68c6d09.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_04_05-05-19.thumb.JPG.51878f27ed8b7b4a63e0d17d3f3147df.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_04_05-05-19_copy.thumb.JPG.7ba883fe0b65e32d6e17e3cc828a089c.JPG

May 6-7

Amorphophallus_konjac_06_05-06-19.thumb.JPG.9587399857d4d0428319e9f61768d896.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_04_05-07-19.thumb.JPG.7a05f28d445ef8608ec1e615e2c31a8a.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_05_05-07-19.thumb.JPG.437506e752faf707ae5cb2127dae0ca5.JPG

 

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PalmatierMeg

Amorphophallus konjac flowering.

May 8

Amorphophallus_konjac_04_05-08-19.thumb.JPG.29105eeb922f594926930f2ffaeec972.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_07_-5-08-19.thumb.JPG.0a65ef6b8594ccc30cc8827d96abb8a8.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_08_05-08-19.thumb.JPG.ea4f78715c052918044e308e9fab727e.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_09_05-08-19.thumb.JPG.2537b76b1cfbb16812a9dd588c20ad1f.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_10_05-08-19.thumb.JPG.8ac98675aa16abee0829392aa99a583d.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_06_05-08-19.thumb.JPG.96630b4faa3efc5264f919d6e618de0b.JPGAmorphophallus_konjac_03_05-09-19.thumb.JPG.4eac3e4c96d87fa484e8a13afd80116f.JPG

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greysrigging

There are two species of Amorphophallus native to the Darwin region of the Northern Territory. Paeonifolius ( Elephant Foot Yam in Asian countries or 'Cheeky Yam' in Darwin ) and A. galbra. The bulbs are edible, but not highly regarded as a food source by the local Indigenous peoples hence the naming 'Cheeky'. 
Paeonifolius flower.
42854484_1845201902253671_9093756323362766848_n.jpg.7045880b08a38534ea724722dc2451c3.jpg
Amorphophallus bulbifer ( what we know as 'Snake Lily or Voodoo lily is also a  relatively common garden plant.
42898071_10156605040578965_251312817255219200_n.jpg.2bdec8b12db62d26752ba435f719ca7c.jpg44412536_2239024002788454_8475214997616590848_n.jpg.d897ce5a39b794c10bfe42f4855832c5.jpg44520845_2207771019546550_5039623138028027904_n.jpg.cbfab4034b23d200d14ceade321a3940.jpg
Here is a tutorial on how to take leaf cuttings to propagate the Amorphophallus group of plants. I have had success with this method with a 95% strike rate.
https://www.abc.net.au/gardening/factsheets/an-unusual-edible/9436836?fbclid=IwAR3v6iTSBEqHqcfwCPIUoBgSyxOvd8U-8cxTe3Hclh7HjIKfrRsyr_Duexs

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Palm crazy

Graysrigging nice photos! :greenthumb:

Meg what a wonderful surprise for your garden. It's a testament to your garden skills! :greenthumb:

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PalmatierMeg

@Palmcrazy, thanks.

@greysrigging, I recently got a small paeonifolius so won't see a flower for a few years. I've not heard of A. galbra but I'll watch for it. I have an A. mossambicensis Inhajange Form opening a small flower on a long stem. I may post a few photos of it soon.

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Palmaceae

That is awesome Meg!

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tropicbreeze

That first plant of Megs is an Amorphophallus paeoniifolius. The A. konjac has a different inflorescence, more like the usual aroid type rather than that of the A. paeoniifolius.

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PalmatierMeg
12 hours ago, tropicbreeze said:

That first plant of Megs is an Amorphophallus paeoniifolius. The A. konjac has a different inflorescence, more like the usual aroid type rather than that of the A. paeoniifolius.

Thanks for the correction. It was sold to me as A. konjac. I like it anyway

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tropicbreeze

A. konjac seems to be the most common Amorph in the US, going by internet forums, but isn't so common in Australia. Here A. bulbifer seems the most common but it's very invasive. I'm having trouble getting it out of the garden after mistakenly planting some.

A. paeoniifolius will clump producing a lot of pups but doesn't really spread. It's leaf is quite beautiful, my tallest got up to 2.4 metres and I've seen them taller out bush.Their trunk (petiole) is fairly brittle and can snap in winds without support. Grown out in the sun they become more stocky and wind resistant.

About A. titanum, they're not so rare these days although still not all that common. I have a small one but a friend has a couple over 2 metres tall. They're different to many other common Amorphs, can't be allowed to dry out. The soil has to be kept moist even during dormancy. Also, they're very susceptible to nematodes, I lost one that way.

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greysrigging
48 minutes ago, tropicbreeze said:

A. konjac seems to be the most common Amorph in the US, going by internet forums, but isn't so common in Australia. Here A. bulbifer seems the most common but it's very invasive. I'm having trouble getting it out of the garden after mistakenly planting some.

A. paeoniifolius will clump producing a lot of pups but doesn't really spread. It's leaf is quite beautiful, my tallest got up to 2.4 metres and I've seen them taller out bush.Their trunk (petiole) is fairly brittle and can snap in winds without support. Grown out in the sun they become more stocky and wind resistant.

About A. titanum, they're not so rare these days although still not all that common. I have a small one but a friend has a couple over 2 metres tall. They're different to many other common Amorphs, can't be allowed to dry out. The soil has to be kept moist even during dormancy. Also, they're very susceptible to nematodes, I lost one that way.

Yes I think the leaf stem cutting method has helped with the propagation of A. titanum and hopefully takes the pressure off harvesting the tubers in its native habitat.
As for A. bulbifer, it is invasive......as any plant with the name 'bulbifer' seems to be.

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tropicbreeze

For anyone with A. titanum leaf cuttings are a good back-up. For anyone with A. bulbifer an incinerator close by is handy.

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