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Livinstona chinensis

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NC_Palms

After seeing Livinstona chinensis at the NC Aquarium at Fort Fisher, I decided to get my own and try it here. Ever since I planted this palm, it seems to be a relatively fast grower.  In my climate, this palm will probably act as a perennial and die back to the ground ever winter.  

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Rickybobby

I hope it works out well for you 

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Jim in Los Altos
3 hours ago, NC_Palms said:

After seeing Livinstona chinensis at the NC Aquarium at Fort Fisher, I decided to get my own and try it here. Ever since I planted this palm, it seems to be a relatively fast grower.  In my climate, this palm will probably act as a perennial and die back to the ground ever winter.  

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Ricky, if it dies to the ground, it's dead forever since these are not clumping (clustering trunks) palms. They are pretty cold hardy however taking temperatures in the low twenties as long as you don't get that cold more than once or twice in the winter. 

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Brad Mondel

I've had these return in my former zone 7a garden. Very bud hardy

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Fusca

Tough guys even as seedlings.  This guy was the sole victim of too much sun (and not enough water) when the angle of the sun changed on my back patio 6 weeks ago.  Turned completely brown including the spear, but now it's coming back!  

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buffy
8 hours ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

Ricky, if it dies to the ground, it's dead forever since these are not clumping (clustering trunks) palms. They are pretty cold hardy however taking temperatures in the low twenties as long as you don't get that cold more than once or twice in the winter. 

I think you're missing his point, Jim. In the Zone 8A/8B world, these are not particularly leaf hardy, but they will come back from the low teens. They grow fast enough that they'll recover each year. They never gain much size, but they survive. 

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Jeff985
51 minutes ago, buffy said:

I think you're missing his point, Jim. In the Zone 8A/8B world, these are not particularly leaf hardy, but they will come back from the low teens. They grow fast enough that they'll recover each year. They never gain much size, but they survive. 

I think you’re talking about two different things. Die to the ground implies die to the roots. What you are talking about is simply defoliating. Those are two completely different things. Yes they can defoliate and recover, but they can’t die to the ground and recover like some clustering palms. 

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buffy
3 hours ago, Jeff985 said:

I think you’re talking about two different things. Die to the ground implies die to the roots. What you are talking about is simply defoliating. Those are two completely different things. Yes they can defoliate and recover, but they can’t die to the ground and recover like some clustering palms. 

Jeff: "Die to the ground implies die to the roots". It certainly implies that to you; however, for many landscapers, "die back perennials", in reference to palms, is simply defoliation. I know the difference. You know the difference. And I suspect NC_Palms knows the difference. What he describes with Livistona chinensis is what he will probably experience. It will "act" as a perennial. We have some L. chinensis here that are +20 years old with 2 feet of trunk. 

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NC_Palms

I think I used the wrong terminology. I interchangeably use "defoliation" and "die back perennial" to refer to the palms I am growing that aren't zone hardy but will come back alive when the spring comes. Botanically, Livinstona chinensis is not a perennial palm since it doesn't resprout from the roots but just like what @buffysaid, this palm simply acts like a perennial. L. chinensis is extremely root hardy. I am aware of people growing this palm surviving winters in zone 7. Otherwise, I apologize for the confusion. 

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Jeff985
1 hour ago, buffy said:

Jeff: "Die to the ground implies die to the roots". It certainly implies that to you; however, for many landscapers, "die back perennials", in reference to palms, is simply defoliation. I know the difference. You know the difference. And I suspect NC_Palms knows the difference. What he describes with Livistona chinensis is what he will probably experience. It will "act" as a perennial. We have some L. chinensis here that are +20 years old with 2 feet of trunk. 

I agree with you. However in the original post it says die back to the ground. I was simply pointing out that Jim wasn’t wrong. You and he were both right. You were just talking about two different things. 

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Jeff985
1 hour ago, NC_Palms said:

I think I used the wrong terminology. I interchangeably use "defoliation" and "die back perennial" to refer to the palms I am growing that aren't zone hardy but will come back alive when the spring comes. Botanically, Livinstona chinensis is not a perennial palm since it doesn't resprout from the roots but just like what @buffysaid, this palm simply acts like a perennial. L. chinensis is extremely root hardy. I am aware of people growing this palm surviving winters in zone 7. Otherwise, I apologize for the confusion. 

No need for apologies. We’re all on this website to learn from each other’s experiences. In the process of learning there’s bound to be some confusion. The great thing about this site is there are always plenty of people eager to try to clear up the confusion. 

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Jim in Los Altos

Mine are trunking as many are so when I said they can’t die back to the ground and survive, you can see what I mean. Defoliating on a single stem trunking palm is survivable but not dying to the ground. :)B70A5304-4930-4ACD-A8B3-170156D4EA28.thumb.jpeg.fa10a922a3704b15eb0f979343e92dbe.jpegB188AF23-5E22-4D07-A63B-1D115CFD1CB9.thumb.jpeg.30ff8a2c6fa98a7baaebf1099f3018bc.jpegFFA480EC-BC93-49FD-AB52-37A87FB602BE.thumb.jpeg.d4175159cb06b4bf93c102b88d348264.jpeg

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Jeff985
18 minutes ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

Mine are trunking as many are so when I said they can’t die back to the ground and survive, you can see what I mean. Defoliating on a single stem trunking palm is survivable but not dying to the ground. :)B70A5304-4930-4ACD-A8B3-170156D4EA28.thumb.jpeg.fa10a922a3704b15eb0f979343e92dbe.jpegB188AF23-5E22-4D07-A63B-1D115CFD1CB9.thumb.jpeg.30ff8a2c6fa98a7baaebf1099f3018bc.jpegFFA480EC-BC93-49FD-AB52-37A87FB602BE.thumb.jpeg.d4175159cb06b4bf93c102b88d348264.jpeg

Nice double. I’ve got one like that. Not quite as much trunk though. 

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Jim in Los Altos
20 hours ago, Jeff985 said:

Nice double. I’ve got one like that. Not quite as much trunk though. 

It’s a triple!

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Jeff985
2 minutes ago, Jim in Los Altos said:

It’s a triple!

Now I see it. There is a third trunk. Even better. Those look really good as multiples. There are two doubles with about seven feet of trunk I drive past on my way to work every day. Makes me jealous. 

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NC_Palms
 
 
 
On 5/15/2019 at 2:38 AM, Jim in Los Altos said:

Mine are trunking as many are so when I said they can’t die back to the ground and survive, you can see what I mean. Defoliating on a single stem trunking palm is survivable but not dying to the ground. :)B70A5304-4930-4ACD-A8B3-170156D4EA28.thumb.jpeg.fa10a922a3704b15eb0f979343e92dbe.jpegB188AF23-5E22-4D07-A63B-1D115CFD1CB9.thumb.jpeg.30ff8a2c6fa98a7baaebf1099f3018bc.jpegFFA480EC-BC93-49FD-AB52-37A87FB602BE.thumb.jpeg.d4175159cb06b4bf93c102b88d348264.jpeg

Thanks for sharing Jim. Those are nice looking palms.

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NC_Palms
On 5/15/2019 at 2:38 AM, Jim in Los Altos said:

Mine are trunking as many are so when I said they can’t die back to the ground and survive, you can see what I mean. Defoliating on a single stem trunking palm is survivable but not dying to the ground. :)B70A5304-4930-4ACD-A8B3-170156D4EA28.thumb.jpeg.fa10a922a3704b15eb0f979343e92dbe.jpegB188AF23-5E22-4D07-A63B-1D115CFD1CB9.thumb.jpeg.30ff8a2c6fa98a7baaebf1099f3018bc.jpegFFA480EC-BC93-49FD-AB52-37A87FB602BE.thumb.jpeg.d4175159cb06b4bf93c102b88d348264.jpeg

Thanks for sharing Jim. Those are nice lookin palms

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dalmatiansoap

Absolutely beautiful palms!

And I finally have some seeds:wub2:

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palmfriend

This is one of the great species - besides the Satakentia L. - from here,

slow but as hard as a nail. Keeping them in shade when young will

let them grow long leaflets, out in the sun - no need for it. ;) 

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Here a young one - surrounded by many other plants.

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Here some taller ones, now around 30(+)years old. 

Best regards from Okinawa -

Lars

 

 

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