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Tracy

Dypsis ambositrae speed of growth?

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Tracy

I was very impressed when I was first exposed to this palm while visiting Jason's (Hilo now, Fallbrook then) garden on a Palm Society tour several years back.  Fast forward a couple of years, and I decided to try a couple myself.  I'm curious what others experience on speed of growth is.  While these seem to put out consistent new leaves, it seems that at least while still young there isn't a lot of change in girth or height.  If you have grown this, is there a magic size when they suddenly begin to accelerate?  If so how old, or what size when they hit the accelerator.  I won't say gas pedal, because maybe that will date this thread someday :D.  Please share your experience and/or a time series set of photos to really allow visualization.  Danke, Merci, Gracias and Thanks in advance for your feedback!

20190509-104A3176.jpg

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Tracy

To provide my experience, here is the same one above, shown when I planted it in May 2016.  The other one is a year older planted in March 2015, but this one has always looked the best of the two.

20160518-104A1767_Dypsis_ambositrae_planting_front.jpg

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Ben in Norcal

Err, only 3 years?  That sure seems like fast growth?

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DoomsDave

My limited observation is that D. ambositrae really really likes cool coastal conditions best. @Tracy's growth rate is par for the course near the beach; further inland, even for me, they're about half or a third the speed and they don't seem to get that nice glossy coloration as much.

 

There were also some great specimens up in the Bay Area.

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Matt in OC

I have a one gal from Floribunda that I put in the ground last year. It was in shade all winter in a poor draining area and I was really impressed how good it looked and continued to grow. I’ve tried a few in sun and heat before and they were not happy. It seems to me that is/was the conventional wisdom. I think yours looks pretty good Tracy!

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Ben in Norcal

They do great here in anything from full shade to full baking 100+ degree sun.  They aren't fast, but are one of the four Dypsis that do really well here (decipiens, baronii, and onilahensis being the others.)  Just impossible to find up here, thus my trips down to SoCal!  Now that the trip is pretty well free for me (unlimited free supercharging), I expect I will be doing it more.  It's a good winter activity to visit Josh and Joe!

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Darold Petty

This palm even grows for me in the cold, humid, marine overcast conditions ! :mrlooney:

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LJG

Tracy, mine that Marcus is selling are super fast too. I bought some overgrown 4 inch pots from him last spring. I planted two right into the ground in almost full sun and they hardly burned and grow year round. Great Dypsis. 

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Tracy
25 minutes ago, Darold Petty said:

This palm even grows for me in the cold, humid, marine overcast conditions ! :mrlooney:

What sort of pace?

 

14 hours ago, Ben in Norcal said:

Err, only 3 years?  That sure seems like fast growth?

Not when compared to some of the other Dypsis I have, particularly the clumping ones.  Dypsis heteromorpha over the same 3 year period below is one that I'm comparing it to .  In the older photo it is in the far right of the potted triangle, which is also another one which is much faster.  I had already transplanted the triangle into that bigger pot, later put it in my front.  It reaches up well overhead now too (photo of that D decaryi from last month posted below too).  There are others from that period too that outpace my ambositraes; ncluding a Dypsis plumosa in a 3"x9" band which is now as tall as I am (still no trunk but amazing growth all the same).

20190411-104A2917.jpg

20160306-104A1140.jpg

20190415-104A2971.jpg

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Ben in Norcal
3 minutes ago, Tracy said:

Not when compared to some of the other Dypsis I have, particularly the clumping ones.  Dypsis heteromorpha over the same 3 year period below is one that I'm comparing it to .  In the older photo it is in the far right of the potted triangle, which is also another one which is much faster.  I had already transplanted the triangle into that bigger pot, later put it in my front.  It reaches up well overhead now too (photo of that D decaryi from last month posted below too).  There are others from that period too that outpace my ambositraes; ncluding a Dypsis plumosa in a 3"x9" band which is now as tall as I am (still no trunk but amazing growth all the same).

20190411-104A2917.jpg

20160306-104A1140.jpg

20190415-104A2971.jpg

Fair enough, but I think you are doing pretty well!  I'd be shocked to see much faster growth than you are achieving on these.

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enigma99

Yeah I agree with Ben. Those are some of the fastest I’ve seen. Thanks for sharing 

Edited by enigma99

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Hilo Jason

Wow, some great growth in 3 years on all the palms pictured in this thread.  Great job Tracy.  

As for Ambositrae, it looks like yours is growing at a nice rate.  I had 10 or so planted in my Fallbrook garden and some were slow and some were fast.  There were some differences to how they looked in my opinion as well, and I bought from several different sources over the years.  So I think there was some variation going around within Ambositrae.  

I have 2 planted here in Hilo so I'm looking forward to seeing how they do here.  Here's my larger of the two I planted.  

IMG_0438.thumb.JPG.a86329d7a8903c4d893a43070c9bf439.JPG

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richnorm

Growth rate varies hugely from plant to plant for me. I think it might depend on the seed source.

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Tyrone

I've always found them slow. I think the sun is stronger in the Southern Hemisphere or something else is going on but mine need part shade or they just burn. Once you get that right spot they are happy consistent growers but not the fastest by far. 

Tracy you are getting a wonderful speed of growth out of yours and many of your other palms too so keep posting pics. 

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Tracy
1 hour ago, Tyrone said:

I think the sun is stronger in the Southern Hemisphere or something else is going on but mine need part shade or they just burn. Once you get that right spot they are happy consistent growers but not the fastest by far. 

Being close to the ocean, I get plenty of fog and marine layer days in the late spring and early summer, so it isn't always fair to compare what I give full sun versus some other areas close but just a little further inland.  You may have similar micro-climates close to the water and a little further back, similar to what we experience here.  I see Albany is very similar in proximity to the equator at 35 degrees south  compared to me north of the equator at 33 degrees.  I'm not complaining about the growth of mine, but was more curious if these hit a point where they really speed up.  For example, Dypsis prestoniana seems to really hit the acceleration button once it gets to near trunking size and just keep pressing forward.  All plants seem to like the sandy soil here better than my previous home which had clay soil and is only 3.5 miles away.  I know because everything seems to grow faster here than in the other garden.

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richnorm

Yes, you do get that "S" curve growth with Ambo's. 

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Tyrone
8 hours ago, Tracy said:

Being close to the ocean, I get plenty of fog and marine layer days in the late spring and early summer, so it isn't always fair to compare what I give full sun versus some other areas close but just a little further inland.  You may have similar micro-climates close to the water and a little further back, similar to what we experience here.  I see Albany is very similar in proximity to the equator at 35 degrees south  compared to me north of the equator at 33 degrees.  I'm not complaining about the growth of mine, but was more curious if these hit a point where they really speed up.  For example, Dypsis prestoniana seems to really hit the acceleration button once it gets to near trunking size and just keep pressing forward.  All plants seem to like the sandy soil here better than my previous home which had clay soil and is only 3.5 miles away.  I know because everything seems to grow faster here than in the other garden.

I'm about 5.5 miles inland from the southern ocean and am pretty much at the most southerly point in Western Australia. We do get lots of cloud and low cloud here. Spring can be a gloomy affair, but fog etc is much more common in the cooler time of the year. You can get it in summer and more likely in spring than summer but it burns off pretty quickly.  My strongest UV for some reason is in late spring. I've recorded a UV index of 15 in spring and then in summer it dropped off.

You seem to be able to grow D ambositrae really well in your full sun. I wonder how our sea temps compare. At the moment at the end of autumn the SST here is 21C around 70F.

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Tracy
2 hours ago, Tyrone said:

At the moment at the end of autumn the SST here is 21C around 70F

While there have been recent years where we still have near we have water temps at 21C in our equivalent season, I can remember plenty of very cold mornings a month before our winter solstice with water temps at 15.5C or 60F.  Low water temps normally hover between 60 and 57 in winter with some exceptionally cold mornings dropping to 12C or 54F normally associated with windswell upwelling.  Scripps Pier in La Jolla hit a summer record temp of 78.6F or 25.9C this last summer, with exceptionally warm water lasting all summer in the mid 70's F or 22 to 24.5C.   I pay attention to water temps not only because I surf year round, but my business is solar evaporation of seawater to produce salt.  While our system's intake is in the San Diego Bay which is always warmer than the ocean just across the Silver Strand, we continually monitor water temps of both the bay and our ponds.  Depending on evaporation for our production, the weather is not just a hobby for me.

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Tyrone

I don't think our SST ever drop below 18C here in the spring, but they never get anywhere near 26C. 21, 22C is about it down here. Very narrow temp range. 

Getting back to D ambositrae I find I need to put a bit of a shade sail over the young ones in the ground to prevent them burning.

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Tracy

Since I was out in the garden with the camera earlier this week, I snapped a couple of photos of the nicer of my two Dypsis ambositrae because I was so impressed with the great color contrast of the emergent spear and most recent petiole against the white leaf sheath and green leaves.  What an attractive palm these are!  The progressively closer look provided in this sequence.

20200109-104A5444.jpg

20200109-104A5445.jpg

20200109-104A5446.jpg

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OC2Texaspalmlvr

Great looking palm , I'm so jealous of anyone who can grow dypsis <_<

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The Gerg

I love the coloring on the D. Ambositrae’s. Mine is not as far along as yours @Tracy. I can’t wait for the white powdery crown shaft. Mine actually just recently developed a second growing point. So I think as soon as the lowest leaf sheath comes off a second stem may be exposed. As far as it’s speed....I find it to be kind of average. I don’t find it to be real slow. You know, compared to some others. It’s much faster than a D. Decipiens for example, but much slower than a D. Leptocheilos. (Ya, I know I picked one of the fastest Dypsis and one of the slowest Dypsis, so I guess I left a pretty large window which doesn’t really narrow it down too much). Of course, the “speed of growth” I’m referring too is more about new leaf openings. As far as putting on some real size, that will have to be a wait and see for me. That very well may be slow for all I know. I do have two others in pots though and one of those is really putting on some size. So I stand by my “average speed” assessment.

980BBCA2-064E-431E-B41B-BC5D1024B0AA.thumb.jpeg.9f8793c1030097b8ab82135be3019886.jpegE1A201AC-F695-4DDE-9F64-D47C15CFD1AA.thumb.jpeg.fca82671a2902318e26e7c6689d7d79f.jpeg

Edited by The Gerg
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Tracy
20 hours ago, The Gerg said:

Of course, the “speed of growth” I’m referring too is more about new leaf openings. As far as putting on some real size, that will have to be a wait and see for me. That very well may be slow for all I know. I do have two others in pots though and one of those is really putting on some size. So I stand by my “average speed” assessment.

I'm seeing significant increase in the size of each new leaf now, which started to become noticeable at about the size yours is in the photo above.   Yours looks very healthy!

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Hilo Jason

Looking really nice Tracy!  One of my favorites, especially for California. 

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Rafael

Great thread and superb ambositrae visuals!

i started with a small one, last summer and i expect lots of grwoth in the next 2/3 years, here in my atlantic climate 

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Tracy
23 hours ago, Rafael said:

Great thread and superb ambositrae visuals!

i started with a small one, last summer and i expect lots of grwoth in the next 2/3 years, here in my atlantic climate 

You should do well with it based on the experiences of many in this thread.  Darold is north in a little cooler climate than I am and your climate is probably somewhere between what he and I experience.  I visited Praia da Costa Nova and Barra which are near you in Ovar about a year ago, while traveling between Porto & Peniche.  Porto reminded me more of Northern California, while Peniche's climate more closely resembled my home climate in Southern California.  You will have to share some photos of your D ambositrae as it progresses!  Hopefully you will pave a path for others in the coastal area of Portugal to grow this palm!  Wishing you success!

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Tyrone
On 1/16/2020 at 8:29 AM, Rafael said:

Great thread and superb ambositrae visuals!

i started with a small one, last summer and i expect lots of grwoth in the next 2/3 years, here in my atlantic climate 

Rafael, it will do well for you. The climate down here is Portugal like if you know what I mean. The temps are good for this species.

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tim_brissy_13

Here’s mine that I’ve recently planted at my new property. It has always been quite slow but happy. Growth rate probably not helped by the recent transplant from my previous property. I’ve had it about 4 years now and was about half this size when I got it. 

F213F134-DA03-4B34-8C1A-5DAB07A88E65.jpeg

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Tracy
On 1/11/2020 at 6:17 PM, Tracy said:

Since I was out in the garden with the camera earlier this week, I snapped a couple of photos of the nicer of my two Dypsis ambositrae because I was so impressed with the great color contrast of the emergent spear and most recent petiole against the white leaf sheath and green leaves. 

When given plenty of sun, water and fast draining soil, Dypsis ambositrae is a fantastic solitary Dypsis species with pretty fast growth.  When the most recent leaf base came off it showed it's first ring of trunk above the soil.  The one in my back yard doesn't get as much sun due to filtering from some nearby palms and it hasn't kept up pace with this one.  That said, it looks like it will be equally attractive.

20200901-BH3I0972.jpg

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Jan Jo
11 minutes ago, Tracy said:

When given plenty of sun, water and fast draining soil, Dypsis ambositrae is a fantastic solitary Dypsis species with pretty fast growth.  When the most recent leaf base came off it showed it's first ring of trunk above the soil.  The one in my back yard doesn't get as much sun due to filtering from some nearby palms and it hasn't kept up pace with this one.  That said, it looks like it will be equally attractive.

20200901-BH3I0972.jpg

Amazing, I can't believe how well Dypsis grow for you! Mine are snails in comparison... 

BTW, what's the palm to the far left in this photo? 

J

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Ben in Norcal
1 minute ago, Jan Jo said:

Amazing, I can't believe how well Dypsis grow for you! Mine are snails in comparison... 

BTW, what's the palm to the far left in this photo? 

J

I guess Gaussia.

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Tracy
15 minutes ago, Ben in Norcal said:

I guess Gaussia.

Ben is correct!

 

20 minutes ago, Jan Jo said:

BTW, what's the palm to the far left in this photo? 

Gaussia princeps on the left, Arenga engleri clump behind it and Copernicia x textilis to the right.  Encephalartos trispinosis & Encephalartos horridus Steytlerville form also behind it.  The Aloe/Aloidendron in the pot was acquired as bainsii, but I'm not sure at this point.

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doubravsky

I've got three growing in Riverside. They get morning sun but shade by about noon. They've been slow (planted 2003 from 1 gallon pots), but always look really healthy. Interestingly, two of them (first picture) have a good 6' of trunk, while the third (same batch,planted same time, right next to the two and get the same water and fert) is still only about 2' tall.   

 

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Jan Jo
43 minutes ago, Tracy said:

Ben is correct!

 

Gaussia princeps on the left, Arenga engleri clump behind it and Copernicia x textilis to the right.  Encephalartos trispinosis & Encephalartos horridus Steytlerville form also behind it.  The Aloe/Aloidendron in the pot was acquired as bainsii, but I'm not sure at this point.

It looks great! Never thought Gaussia would look so good in a California climate, so I never tried growing them here in Spain. Maybe I should! 

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      I planted these in spring, and they were in really poor shape, which they are still trying to grow out of.
      The one on he left has pretty much stalled, and the spear doesn't seem to be growing - but it was for a while, and has thrown out a new leaf since I planted it. It gets a good bit of shade, and probably plenty of water. Perhaps it has started to grow into the clay? The one on the right is growing fine.

      Any thoughts?


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