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SilverDragon

Seedling assistance

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SilverDragon

Hey guys. For the past few months my Washingtonian adonidia have been growing quite happily. I'm just wondering if I should move them up to slightly larger pots now?

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Neil C

Those pots are still huge. I wouldn't move them for at least a year, maybe two.

Regards Neil

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HtownPalms

I am growing my first batch of palm seedlings ever.  My seedlings are about the same size as yours. Two weeks ago I decided to move a few from their starter pots to 3 gallon pots. I transplanted 10 Chamaerops humilis and 3 Archontophoenix maxima.  So far I have lost all 3 A. Maxima and about 4 C. Humilis. Fortunately I have many more seedlings, but I am going to wait a lot longer on the rest before transplanting them. 

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Rickybobby

I myself put sprouted seeds in a community pot or beer cups and leave them in there for a year before Transplanting them. Mainly for drainage and of course space. It adds up when you have 100 seedlings 

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PalmatierMeg

Leave them alone.They (Adonidias) will be a tough grow for you in OH under any circumstances. Once your weather is reliably hot and humid, consider moving them outdoors in a protected spot and away from your dark, dry house.

What do you mean Washingtonian Adonidias? Two species? Adonidias are tropical Asian species, very cold sensitive. Washingtonians are temperate palms that are much hardier. You can't treat them both exactly the same. The Washies will benefit from being outdoors during your humid summers and can take colder temps.

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SilverDragon
3 minutes ago, PalmatierMeg said:

Leave them alone.They (Adonidias) will be a tough grow for you in OH under any circumstances. Once your weather is reliably hot and humid, consider moving them outdoors in a protected spot and away from your dark, dry house.

What do you mean Washingtonian Adonidias? Two species? Adonidias are tropical Asian species, very cold sensitive. Washingtonians are temperate palms that are much hardier. You can't treat them both exactly the same. The Washies will benefit from being outdoors during your humid summers and can take colder temps.

That must've been a typo. I have A merrillii and W robusta.

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