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Silas_Sancona

Plumeria season 2019

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Silas_Sancona

With mid spring heat building, and summer not that far off.. its only a given that Plumeria are starting their flowering season.  After quite the hiatus, and some challenges, looks like some of mine will push inflos this season..  To start things off in the right direction, a plant i stuck out front back in 2017 decided to surprise me with it's first flowering attempt..    Fast forward several weeks, ..and we have the first flowers.. Looking closely at pic #1, you can see that i painted the trunk of the plant.. Did the same w/ all the potted specimens as well.. Sunburn has been a real challenge here. 
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Now comes a somewhat tough decision. As i'd thought, this plant is one of my seedlings i started back in 2008 while in Ohio from plants brought back from my first trip to Florida.  I'd had several ..most of which i had to leave in Florida after they out grew their pots and into the ground. Some were left in the yard, others i planted in the green space between our house and the condos behind us.. wonder if they're still there.. anyway.. Cuttings taken off those ended up suffering fatal sun burn the first summer here. This plant was the only one i was able to save.  Have a little more time, but ..to take with, or leave here??

Anyway, more to come..  And ( as always ) Don't be shy    ..or just read this and not share....     If they're flowering,    share 'em..    Simple enough :greenthumb:

-Nathan

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pj_orlando_z9b

Not flowering yet but getting started. I have a ruby in the ground. Didn't die back this winter so perhaps decent growth this year? Also got a free cutting (white flowers) and excited about my kauka wilder that has started leafing.

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Chris Wilson

I live in Ohio and have 2 plumerias, I plant them in the spring and dig them up in the fall. I just planted them yesterday so no sign of a inflo yet. I got my first inflo last fall, I got a few flowers then it was time to dig them up. Hopefully they will bloom earlier this year.IMG_5661.thumb.JPG.89f3c3b471d333c6dd74864e291a878e.JPGIMG_7072.thumb.JPG.d16910cf3a3266332c7c451a35781188.JPGIMG_7117.thumb.jpg.cd8881f1520b574c9ef175a8f9cb1feb.jpg

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pj_orlando_z9b

Sea World Orlando 5/4

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PalmatierMeg

We have three Plumeria: two in the ground (white and fuschia)  and one cutting (yellow) in a pot we bought at a local plant sale last month. All are currently blooming. They drop their leaves in the fall leaving only gray branches all winter. I don't know the names of their cultivars

#1) White with yellow center flower we've had for several years

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#2) Plumeria with fuschia flowers

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#3) Cutting with yellow flowers

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Silas_Sancona

:greenthumb: Great pictures everyone,

@Chris Wilson As mentioned, this seedling was started in Ohio, Milford / Mulberry area just north east of Cincinnati specifically.  Had told the story sometime ago but basically picked up the mom to the seedlings the summer before the seedpod ripened. Sat in my bedroom w/ the other plants i had picked up on that trip pots/ stems wrapped in towels through a big ice storm we'd had late that winter that knocked out the power for a day. Wasn't sure the developing Pod would make it but once spring arrived, it matured and split. Later, after i returned to CA. the still seedling -sized plants sat in a makeshift greenhouse at my Grandparents. Not sure why but i had forgot to bring them in thru a Frost /freeze we had there.. I thought i would've lost all of them. Surprised me again.  Even if i end up using this plant for crossing attempts later on, vs growing it out, and selling or gifting cuttings, it's story is one of a kind.

@PalmatierMeg As i'm sure you know, with Plumeria, unless tagged when purchased, pretty tough to narrow down an exact cultivar name, especially in places like Florida and Hawaii where they have been grown / crossed, & passed around for sometime..  That said, the second, dark pink flowered plant could be a classic variety i used to see all over Bradenton and Sarasota an expert grower i buy from in Homestead calls "Cranberry Red"  If the last plant ( w/ the yellow flowers ) smells like Peaches or Nectarines, highly likely its a cross involving.. or seedling from.. "Aztec Gold", another classic and common variety.

@pj_orlando_z9b Nice plants, you'll like Kauka Wilder.. It may flower this year, then skip a year or two.. A lot of times, the nurseries will take cuttings off branches old enough to flower. Instead of aborting it, Plumeria cuttings generally have enough reserve to push the inflo. After that, some can take a break to recover before flowering again, focusing on gaining size /root growth. To help things along, esp. w/ any that are old enough to flower but don't this season, throw Potassium and minors at them. I know i probably mention it too much, but keep the Phosphorus low.. or hit them w/ a higher %'age right about now for the year.. Same person in Homestead i referenced for Meg, and some other growers i have spoken to have explained that good fertilization / growth one year will normally result in flowers the next on stubborn plants.. Skip a year?, your plants might do the same next year.. Some are more forgiving ofcourse and flower every year regardless of how well/ not so well they are fed...

You and others around Orlando might be aware of this already but there's good grower in Geneva located between Lake Jessup and Lake Harney worth checking out. The nursery is the only Plumeria grower permitted  to sell cultivars / hybrids directly from a world renowned grower in Thailand.. Thai cultivars, take Plumeria to a whole new level..

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Silas_Sancona

Plumeria X " Maui Beauty on stage in 110F heat..  which is helping to intensify the colors of the flowers..
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Hillizard

I decided not to risk/test my Plumeria cultivars in-ground, and wasn't looking forward to watering them this summer, so I stuffed all eight in one pot. That will also make overwintering them in my garage a lot easier. I predict it'll be at least a month and a half before any of them bloom this year.

Plumeria2019.png

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Zeeth

I got cuttings from some Plumerias at the USDA to see how they do up in Tampa. These ones were the nicest:

Yellow Rainbow:

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Penang Peach:

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Silas_Sancona
1 hour ago, Zeeth said:

I got cuttings from some Plumerias at the USDA to see how they do up in Tampa. These ones were the nicest:

Yellow Rainbow:

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Penang Peach:

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You'll enjoy both of these, esp. Penang Peach. Great cultivar and Pod Parent to some stunning hybrids itself, including Musk Rainbow / George Brown.. 

For everyone,  Premium Plumerias, located in Southern CA. shared some pictures from a trip they'd made to Thailand back in April to visit a Thai Plumeria grower, Dr. Kukiat Tanteerartam who, as i have shared before, has created some eye popping Plumeria cultivars. During the trip, they also visited another grower's farm, Nui Leera. Take a look at that photo Album ( posted April 27th ) Among the pictures is one with a bouquet of flowers.. including some that are nearly Black.. Or, the darkest Red i have ever come across.. Pretty neat and thought i'd share here. Might seem worlds apart but the Plumeria and Palm community have a lot in common. :greenthumb:

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Zeeth
18 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

You'll enjoy both of these, esp. Penang Peach. Great cultivar and Pod Parent to some stunning hybrids itself, including Musk Rainbow / George Brown.

I was actually planning on hybridizing it once it starts flowering. I have some nice varieties like Miami Rose and Pu'u kahea that I wanted to try mixing it with.

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Silas_Sancona
19 minutes ago, Zeeth said:

I was actually planning on hybridizing it once it starts flowering. I have some nice varieties like Miami Rose and Pu'u kahea that I wanted to try mixing it with.

Good choices, Post some updates when you do.

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jimmyt

Nice plumeria pictures all.  Now which ones have the best scent in your opinion?

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Zeeth
2 minutes ago, jimmyt said:

Nice plumeria pictures all.  Now which ones have the best scent in your opinion?

My favorite is Miami rose (pictured below). It smells like coconut scented sunscreen. Aztec gold has a peachy smell that's very nice too.

 

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jimmyt

Very Nice!  I guess that I need to get a Miami rose.  I have an Aztec Gold just not sure it has bloomed.   Celadines are blooming now.  Love those Frangipanis!

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NOT A TA

Last of the flowers still out I have currently here in S FL.   With what I do I need good size plants so I'll get "cuttings" from landscapers who trim what are basically small trees here. So I'll stick branches up to say 3" diameter along with some smaller ones in a 7 gallon bucket to root them.

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Edited by NOT A TA
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Chris Chance

I only have one Plumeria here but seems to do well. Still not sure of the species but has been reliable. This year we had a more prolonged cold spell in February and it was the first year it dropped all the leaves. In past it kept most of them. Anyway I posted a photo of the first bloom of the year to share. 

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palmsOrl

Anybody have Plumeria obtusa?  

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msporty

Season is just getting kicking! Here is Thornton’s Lemon Drop.F64649E3-8EAE-47D2-A745-F394CA8621D6.thumb.jpeg.a22573d4eae4fb905a7305db4d8347c4.jpeg

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pietropuccio

'Pops Red'

 

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Chris Wilson

My Plumeria in Ohio has been blooming since August.

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Makaisland Palms

Just had my second plant ever to bloom!  Of course, October in Austria is not ideal for this, but I'm pretty happy either way!  Just wondering what you guys think about this flower size.  Do you think they are so small because of the time of year?  Maybe not enough nutrients?  Or just the luck of the draw, as they're from seed.

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Silas_Sancona
10 hours ago, Makaisland Palms said:

Just had my second plant ever to bloom!  Of course, October in Austria is not ideal for this, but I'm pretty happy either way!  Just wondering what you guys think about this flower size.  Do you think they are so small because of the time of year?  Maybe not enough nutrients?  Or just the luck of the draw, as they're from seed.

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Nice, and don't look at the timing as unusual. Theyll often flower up until or through October in Califorina and Florida also.  One a neighbor has was flowering in December last year. 

If this one is another seedling, give it another year or so to determine ultimate or average flower size for that particular specimen.  First couple flowering attempts can present different coloration / sized flowers compared to later when the plant is more matured..  Have heard of plants presenting flowers that were white or yellowish the first couple times they flowered, only to end up red or pinkish, on the same plant, later on. 

As far as nutrients, looks good to me.  Do keep in mind, for the rest of its life, Lots of K ( Potassium ) 2 times a year, esp. in pots,  encourages flowers / an overall healthier plant. Go organic if you can.  Only apply Phosphorus once a year..  Easy to ruin their health w/ too much of it. I hit mine with an organic source of it just as they wake up in spring.  ' Couple doses of 8- 10%  Nitrogen during the year is perfect. Too much and they'll grow like crazy, but refuse to flower., or get weak and lanky if in too much shade. 

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Hillizard

This very warm growing season has really pushed the 8 plumerias I stuffed in one pot! But my most dependable bloomer every year, at least where I live, is 'Aztec Gold.' Flowers are a good size, have petals with a heavy texture, great keeping quality and peach-mango scent. I overwinter them outdoors, next to a wall in my pergola. I think it's one more people should try growing wherever they live.

AztecGold2020.png

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Silas_Sancona
7 minutes ago, Hillizard said:

This very warm growing season has really pushed the 8 plumerias I stuffed in one pot! But my most dependable bloomer every year, at least where I live, is 'Aztec Gold.' Flowers are a good size, have petals with a heavy texture, great keeping quality and peach-mango scent. I overwinter them outdoors, next to wall in my pergola. I think it's one more people should try growing wherever they live.

AztecGold2020.png

Nice Jeff.. Agree, Aztec Gold is one of the easiest cultivars. Produces some really nice crosses as well.  Wish i had something to share this year but my collection looks pretty beat up after all the heat ( and non stop spider mite attacks ).. and that is keeping them all under shade cloth, where they also get afternoon shade from the Mesquite.  Compared to a couple others in the neighborhood that are fully exposed to all day sun, no complaints, lol..

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dalmatiansoap

Beautiful plants! I just sticked one small branch in perlite hoping it will root before winter. How long it takes them to get starting from small cuttings? Btw, it's a yellow flower sp.

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Silas_Sancona
10 minutes ago, dalmatiansoap said:

Beautiful plants! I just sticked one small branch in perlite hoping it will root before winter. How long it takes them to get starting from small cuttings? Btw, it's a yellow flower sp.

How long is the cutting?.. Green or grayish wood? Curious because both can factor into how long it might take to root.  Green wood / tip cuts can be more challenging.. i often end up loosing them to rot - not matter what method/ soil medium i use.  Cuttings w/ more mature gray or brown-ish wood tend to seal up/ root better/easier. Length of the cutting also matters. Most growers i learned from advise rooting cuts no shorter than about 11". 14-18" is said to be best.   Can say -after lots of trying- really short cuts, say under 6-7", or those that are really skinny, can be a real challenge... have been for me anyway.

Timing is hard to say but if the cut sealed well after allowing it to dry, and the spot where you have it is warm enough, cuts can start rooting within a few weeks.. That said, most plants in the northern hemisphere, outside Hawaii, Mexico, and S. FL. will start their natural " slow down " cycle for the year soon and this will push back the length of time cuttings can take to root. As you go into winter, would keep the cutting on a heating pad until next spring.. Let it drop any leaves it might have atm, and very little water.. just enough to keep the skin on the branch from wrinkling..  It will be obvious it has rooted when you see lots of new/developing leaves once growth resumes next spring. Even then, i'd let it continue developing in the pot it is in until next fall before repotting, ( if you do ) so that the root system has a season to develop nicely.. Remember, High K / low Phosphorus fert ratio, esp. newly rooted cutting plants.

As mentioned a few times before.. Yellow and White flowered cultivars generally root the easiest. The really nice, dark red/ near black flowered ones can be the most challenging/ often fail...  A big reason why many of those cultivars are often grafted to the root stalk half of a white or yellow flowered variety.

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dalmatiansoap

Thanks for explanation. Now I know that I'm (as always) forced to learn on hard way. I have a green, short cutting on the end of the summer. Not promising but worth trying :)

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Merlyn2220
15 hours ago, Silas_Sancona said:

How long is the cutting?.. Green or grayish wood? Curious because both can factor into how long it might take to root.  Green wood / tip cuts can be more challenging.. i often end up loosing them to rot - not matter what method/ soil medium i use.  Cuttings w/ more mature gray or brown-ish wood tend to seal up/ root better/easier. Length of the cutting also matters. Most growers i learned from advise rooting cuts no shorter than about 11". 14-18" is said to be best.   Can say -after lots of trying- really short cuts, say under 6-7", or those that are really skinny, can be a real challenge... have been for me anyway.

My neighbor gave me two cuttings yesterday, one gray wood and the other gray with some leaves and green wood near the end.  I sliced the ends smooth and set them in a shady spot on my back porch to callous over.  I read this takes a couple of weeks to seal up.  Do you have better success with soil more like cactus/agave soil (i.e. mostly perlite/gravel/sand) or a more generic mix?  They are a white & yellow flower version, so theoretically easier for a newbie to Plumeria like me.

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Silas_Sancona
23 minutes ago, Merlyn2220 said:

My neighbor gave me two cuttings yesterday, one gray wood and the other gray with some leaves and green wood near the end.  I sliced the ends smooth and set them in a shady spot on my back porch to callous over.  I read this takes a couple of weeks to seal up.  Do you have better success with soil more like cactus/agave soil (i.e. mostly perlite/gravel/sand) or a more generic mix?  They are a white & yellow flower version, so theoretically easier for a newbie to Plumeria like me.

Conventional wisdom from many sources suggests " The Grittier, the better" for rooting cuttings.. Has worked well for me in the past.   Some people have had good success using ground Coconut husk also. 

There's someone in California that roots a lot of his cuttings in clear plastic storage bags. Here's the link:  https://www.plumeria.care/rooting/micheles-bag-rooting-method/   and this:  https://southerncaliforniaplumeriasociety.com/bag-rooting-methods/  Want to try this  method this later.    Could use a "Coco Peat/Perlite ( or turface, pumice, etc ) soil mix in place of any of the Peat based, packaged stuff.

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Hillizard
35 minutes ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Conventional wisdom from many sources suggests " The Grittier, the better" for rooting cuttings.. Has worked well for me in the past.   Some people have had good success using ground Coconut husk also. 

There's someone in California that roots a lot of his cuttings in clear plastic storage bags. Here's the link:  https://www.plumeria.care/rooting/micheles-bag-rooting-method/   and this:  https://southerncaliforniaplumeriasociety.com/bag-rooting-methods/  Want to try this  method this later.    Could use a "Coco Peat/Perlite ( or turface, pumice, etc ) soil mix in place of any of the Peat based, packaged stuff.

In the past I've even rooted some Plumeria cuttings in water with rooting hormone, in a warm room in bright sunlight. ;)

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Merlyn2220
1 minute ago, Silas_Sancona said:

Conventional wisdom from many sources suggests " The Grittier, the better" for rooting cuttings.. Has worked well for me in the past.   Some people have had good success using ground Coconut husk also. 

There's someone in California that roots a lot of his cuttings in clear plastic storage bags. Here's the link:  https://www.plumeria.care/rooting/micheles-bag-rooting-method/     Want to try this  method this later.    Could use a "Coco Peat/Perlite ( or turface, pumice, etc ) soil mix in place of any of the Peat based, packaged stuff.

Interesting link, thanks!  A local nursery had a bunch of cuttings in pots out in full blazing sun, and their soil seemed to be pretty rich with a lot of sand and small pine bark chips mixed in.  I read about rooting in water, people seemed to say that it worked okay but the roots were fragile and probably all broke off when transferring to a pot.  But that might not be a big deal, if the plant is already starting to root then it might keep going as though nothing happened.  I, of course, have zero experience trying this.  :D

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Silas_Sancona
1 minute ago, Merlyn2220 said:

Interesting link, thanks!  A local nursery had a bunch of cuttings in pots out in full blazing sun, and their soil seemed to be pretty rich with a lot of sand and small pine bark chips mixed in.  I read about rooting in water, people seemed to say that it worked okay but the roots were fragile and probably all broke off when transferring to a pot.  But that might not be a big deal, if the plant is already starting to root then it might keep going as though nothing happened.  I, of course, have zero experience trying this.  :D

Honestly, I'm too afraid of loosing cuttings to try the water rooting method, lol.  Maybe when i have extras of something easy.. The baggie method(s) would be great for tracking how root development is progressing though. Easier to catch and treat any issues that might occur... and you wouldn't have to lift them out of pots, just re- bag.

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Barry

This is my favorite, called Kimo, great bloomer and nice form to the tree.

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Silas_Sancona
18 minutes ago, Barry said:

This is my favorite, called Kimo, great bloomer and nice form to the tree.

1574E352-0794-4D62-BE54-811A17B0629F.jpeg

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GREAT cultivar.  Nice specimen as well..

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Tracy

First time blossoms on a 2 year old "Fantasia".  Perhaps a combination of less intense sun and heat right on the coast where we are and it being late season, but it is a lighter base color than photos of this species.  We have problems with reds like "Hilo" which grow fine but never bloom here.

20201020-BH3I1380.jpg

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dalmatiansoap
On 8/28/2020 at 10:31 AM, dalmatiansoap said:

Thanks for explanation. Now I know that I'm (as always) forced to learn on hard way. I have a green, short cutting on the end of the summer. Not promising but worth trying :)

Anyway,....

 

IMG_20201111_064507.jpg

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Mangosteen

var plum.jpg

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WaianaeCrider

I can't remember seeing one on sale here on O`ahu unless at some club plant sale.  If you walking or driving down the street and you "spock" one you would like to have all you gotta do if you see the owner is say:  "Hey brah can get one cutting?"   LOL  Most times the reply is : "shoots take two".   LOL

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Tracy
18 hours ago, WaianaeCrider said:

I can't remember seeing one on sale here on O`ahu unless at some club plant sale.  If you walking or driving down the street and you "spock" one you would like to have all you gotta do if you see the owner is say:  "Hey brah can get one cutting?"   LOL  Most times the reply is : "shoots take two".   LOL

Unfortunately, we have had a spate of people not asking and just taking cuttings lately in the San Diego area.  My wife read about the issue on San Diego Gardener in posts from people active with the local plumeria society.  It seems that the red blossomed varieties are the primary targets.  We frequently are giving away cuttings of my San Diego Sunset crawler, as it's always growing onto the walkways and deck, requiring me to remove branches.  It's my ground cover plumeria.

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    • The Germinator
      By The Germinator
      A couple weeks ago I took a friend that is new to this Palm community to go meet Dave. As usual I was not disappointed. I have not been there for several years so the growth of his palms was quite a pleasant surprise. I took advantage of his great deals and brought home this nice souvenir. If anyone knows the registered name for this Plumeria can you chime in. If not I am going to call it "Dave's Delight".  We went back today so my friend could add some really nice Palms and Cycads to his collection.


    • Wodyetia
      By Wodyetia
      I accidentally left a Potted, established plumeria in a very hot spot in my yard. It was neglected and got cooked in a black pot by inland sun. I’ve had experience with sunburn before and it’s usually just unsightly but doesn’t damage the plant. This one I’m not so sure about, seems pretty fried. Leaves haven’t opened. Should I cut and just reroot it?

    • Makaisland Palms
      By Makaisland Palms
      So, just wanted to share an experience, hopefully save someone else some trouble!  After nearly 3 years, I've finally just had my first Plumeria bloom! Yahoo!!! The funny thing is, that I have about fifty plants going, some of which are now nearly 6 feet tall, triple headed and can barely hold themselves up in their pots, but the one that finally flowered, is some squat little two and a half footer, single headed one that I had kind of abandoned in its original small container. So here's the lesson that I think I've learned.  As the other ones were growing, I kept saying to myself, "ooooo yeah!  Get huge! That's the key to flowers coming.  Gotta get these plants as big as I can, that'll definitely get me flowers sooner!" And so, as soon as it grew a bit, I'd pot it up in a bigger container and let it grow even bigger. Loving it!!!!! Buuuuuuuuut, what I figure I've been doing is telling the plant to just keep making new roots. Every time it grows into its container, and it's likely ready to start flowering, I slap it into a bigger container.  Basically saying to it, no! Don't flower, grow more roots!
      And then, outta the blue, one of the puny plants that I wasn't potting up all the time, is the first one to flower!  Ha!  Lesson learned!
       
      Hopefully this saves someone else some time!   
       
      Cheers!

    • Tracy
      By Tracy
      This particular variety of plumeria just wants to crawl along the ground.  This particular plant is growing in the brick planter above.  It's limbs eventually hang over the side and grow down under the weight until they hit the ground and start crawling.  I've removed many sections since I planted it because they eventually get in the way.  It is a hybrid a friend's wife created.  Don't ask me what the parent plants were as I don't recall.  She named it San Diego Sunset, because their home and garden is right above the south end of the San Diego Bay and the various hues of white, pink, orange and yellow reminded them of the sunsets.

    • pspalms
      By pspalms
      I have a forest of 14 of these tropical beauties in large containers that I started from seed over 20 years ago.  The flowers are super fragrant like Plumeria and the 5' - 6' trees are loaded with seed pods.  San Diego Botanical Garden has a large specimen and I am sure SD Zoo has these plants, but I have never found any for sale at local nurseries or online that are larger than 1 gal.
      $275. each      pick up in Vista CA      Gardenia thunbergia | Plantz Africa




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