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Palm Beach Palm & Cycad Society - January Ramble - Stuart, Florida

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Palm Beach Palm & Cycad Society - January Ramble

A Tour of three Gardens in Stuart, Florida

January 5th, 2019

 

1. Dominic Colonna Garden

2. Jack Miller Residence

3. Tracy Sutherland Collection

The society had planned an early winter garden tour to take place in Stuart Florida in Martin County, the next county north of Palm Beach. Any garden tour can be interesting, but when the society stretches beyond its regular boundaries, then you have the opportunity to see gardens and collections you otherwise may never see. All three were new to me. I thought the timing was unique. This is the probably the first palm or plant related event I have attended during the first weekend in January. The weather had turned out to be perfect in every way possible, but it could have been very cold. The first week in January is notorious for being one of the coldest of the year for S. Florida, so we lucked out. The tour was divided into three locations, all close to one another. Minus the trip north, the longest route during the tour was only fifteen minutes. The tour was scheduled to give a fair amount of time at each stop, with lunch at the last location.

 

1. Dominic Colonna Garden

- 10:40AM - "Does this look like the right spot?" - Jeff asking from the driver's seat. "Yeah, I see a lot of cars and a yard full of palms." - I replied. After a decent drive up from Broward County, Jeff Searle and I arrived at the first location just as the tour was starting. We had to find a parking spot without upsetting a neighbor ("stay off the grass!") then jumped out and walked over. First palm I saw was a tall coconut that anchored an oval planting bed at the center of the front yard. (B) "ehh Jeff... the tour is behind you."

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- We were not the first to arrive and certainly not the last. Cars were finding places to park as we walked over to the group. (B) As we got closer, we heard host Dominic (plaid shirt) naming species and describing the overall plan for this particular bed.

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- It was a mix of different palms, cycads, crotons, and a few agave. (B) Left of Dominic standing on the mound, PBPCS Events Chairman Terry Lynch listens to the tour and adds his insight to the cold tolerance of the palms mentioned.

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- A mature and trunk-bearing Dictyosperma album var. conjugatum was the focal point of the bed. It was pushing out those silvery leaves and inflorescences at the same time. (B) The tour was slowly moving from the planting bed to the front of the house.

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Ryan

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- 10:44AM - A Beccariophoenix alfredii, growing ever so well in a prominent position. It will shrug off any cold it receives at this latitude. (B,C) Our host led us across the yard to the planting areas closest to the house. He pointed out a more recently-planted line of Kentiopsis oliviformis.

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- Dominic points out a bushy Old Man Palm, Coccothrinax crinita, that is growing right at the point of the bed. (B) Terry goes in for a closer look. (C) In the background, Society Vice-President Don Bittle (white shirt, hat) checks out the K. oliviformis.

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- The Old Man Palm was perfect, with a full rosette of green leaves and leaf bases packed full of hair. (B,C) We were following the landscaping from right to left, aiming for the the side yard. Numerous smaller plants and bromeliads were tucked in underneath along with a few landscape boulders. Robust and full of color, a clumping specimen of Dypsis pembana was the key palm at the front of the house. It had a perfect spot and thick trunks with broad internode rings.

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- Section by section, we were led across to the side of the yard. A few attendees went in to check on every little plant while others were happy with the wide angle view.

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Ryan

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- 10:46AM - A small Coccothrinax caught my eye. It was growing along the edge of the landscaping right where it begins to turn and end at the side of the house. The soil and the top surface had been amended with seashells. I asked for what species it was but no one had a sure answer. It resembles C. montana to a degree.

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- A Princess gets felt up. Dictyosperma album specimens have all the fun. (B) Nearing the side of the property, a small scattering of Veitchia arecina (and one small Cabada Palm, Dypsis cabadae) take up residence. Dominic had a reason for this small paddock of palms, but I didn't hear it. (C) I began to wonder how many people were going to trip over that seemingly innocuous PVC pipe 'junction' sticking out of the ground. I counted two. 

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- Our host mentioned many of the palms and plants we saw were planted by him in the last few years, while the larger specimens are originals dating back to when the house was built. A fat Sabal palmetto marked the exact edge of the property and guarded the nearby gate... (B) While on the other side, a veteran Areca Palm, Dypsis lutescens, protected the corner of the house.

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- The tour shifted from the front yard to the side yard. With Terry's guidance, everyone was directed through the gate, creating a bit of a bottleneck.

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Ryan

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- 10:52AM - With tour host Doug Wood holding open the gate, Terry continued to usher people through. (B) The front of the pack reached Dominic and slowed down with more attendees still waiting to make it through the gate. I figured I ain't getting through there any time soon, so I took a different route...

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- I entered Dominic's neighbors' yard and followed along the fence from the other side. I reached the front of the pack and listened in as Dominic was describing the newer additions to his collection. Behind him on the left, a Coccothrinax borhidiana near the pool enclosure and in front of him with the stake supports, a Chambeyronia macrocarpa. (B) The pack moved up and waited for more to get through the gate. In the center of the photo, collectors, growers and veterans of more Biennials and PRA's that I can count, Lew & Cathy Burger smiled, as they noticed me taking photos.

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- Our host moved further down, leading the tour to different spots as they approached the back yard. He went in circles pointing out palms and plants in all directions. Right near the fence, a Dypsis prestoniana was getting a lot of attention. (B) Tour attendee and Forum member Raney (raneysurfs) gets in closer and feels the leaflets.

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- It shall get larger. It should get most of its crown over the fence, long enough to start packing on trunk.

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Ryan

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Jeff Searle

Ryan and I were really glad that we came up for this palm tour. Like Ryan said, it was 3 new gardens for both of us to see and a nice chance to meet up with good palmy friends. 

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- 10:54AM - We reached one corner of the backyard that was planted thick with palms and plants. Dominic went in turn describing the species and the planned aspects of this section. That structure made of segmented wooden posts and shade cloth had been protecting something and had been pulled away to better show it, of what I didn't hear. (B) In the left of the image, Dominic is looking down and showcasing a Hydriastele beguinii var. 'Obi Island Form' to the nearby crowd as those more to the right were craning their heads up to look at a variegated Fishtail Palm that was one of the dominant palms of the corner spot. (C) There was a lot of palmness to see and admire, we had about an hour to look around at the first garden.

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- The Variegated Fishtail Palm, Caryota mitis var. 'Variegated', was big. It has a couple large trunks and numerous suckers. The variegation was complete and found on every leaf base, leaflet and pinnule. One leaf here and there might have the variegation in that seldom-seen "half and half" type, where only one half of the leaf is variegated and the other is green.

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- Some of the more striking variegation was found on the smaller suckers. Some of those creamy white stripes look as if they were painted on. (they weren't)

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- Occupying a nice footprint of its own, a broad Licuala ramsayi was pushing out larger and larger leaves. The nearby fence line made a convenient way to both run and elevate irrigation. (B) A good portion of any palm-related-activity is the camaraderie among palm and tropical plant people in attendance. If they weren't talking about the plants in front of them, they were talking about similar ones elsewhere, during another tour, etc.

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Ryan

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- 10:56AM - The tour began to enter the backyard, with the pack catching up. As Raney photographs the Licuala ramsayi, I decided to change my viewpoint.

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- I moved back around and entered through the gate, looking over the items I only saw from afar. I snapped some close-ups of the Coccothrinax borhidiana and the (B) Chambeyronia macrocarpa seen earlier. Many of the smaller and more recently planted palms were staked. I couldn't tell if they were all wobbly when planted or needed the added protection, from wind perhaps?

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- The backyard featured a huge view of palms from left to right. Many were planted along the perimeter and located in groups in different landscape beds. If you were a palm, more than likely you were getting petted today, like the Kentiopsis oliviformis on the far left, getting a rub from PBPCS Director Gerry Valentini. (B) In the far corner of the yard, in the middle of the frame next to the shed, a shadehouse was sheltering a number of seedlings and small plants.

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- The shadehouse and the area in front of the shed had a lot of containerized material for attendees to look through.

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Ryan

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- 10:58AM - A vast planting area dominated the back edge of the property. It had a lot of material planted in close proximity to one another. Among the palms found in this area, one stood out quite vibrantly. It was a densely clustering, blunt-edged & thin-leaflet form of Ivory Crownshaft Palm, Pinanga coronata var. 'blunt, thin leaflet form'. First photo was without flash, (B) second with flash. (C) A shot closer to the crownshafts and leaf bases. This palm was enjoying the full sun and became shorter and more compact as a result.

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- The center of the backyard had another oval planting bed. It was decorated with Crotons, Bromeliads, Cordylines and one Encephalartos. It looks like E. ferox. (B) The outer margin of the pool enclosure had alternating plantings of taller Dypsis pembana and shorter Key Thatch Palms, Leucothrinax morrisii. A small Teddy Bear Palm, Dypsis leptocheilos, was fighting to get into the shot.

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- Attendees followed Dominic as he was pointing out items in the planting areas in the back. (B) Another species often considered a shade palm, Licuala spinosa, was soaking up the full sun. One of the few Licualas that can do that.

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- Positioned out in front of the shadehouse and the shed, is what many here on Palmtalk refer to as a 'Container Ranch'. I figured it consisted of all the containerized plants that were now too large for the shadehouse, or those that could now handle full sun, or both. I didn't see any Ranch Hands at work though. (B) The tour made a right turn and headed along the south edge of the property.

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Ryan

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- 11:01AM - Every plant gets a good looking over. Bromeliads were a focus in the island planting bed. They appear to have been long-time residents and were forming colonies.

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- Looking to the right in the green shirt and sunglasses, SFPS Director Rick Johnson notices something interesting the tour hadn't yet reached. (B) In that mass of plant people, somewhere, our host was directing the tour near the fence line.

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- The tour moved quickly through some areas and had to slow down and take their time in others.

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- Another view of the container ranch seen above. Everything was perfectly grown, weeded and happy. (B) A nicely grown Dypsis psammophila enjoying filtered light.

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Ryan

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- 11:04AM - A look inside the shadehouse shows a lot of growing going on - along with a bit of glare. (B) Right in front of the shadehouse, a showy Satakentia liukiuensis was standing guard. I could not tell for sure, but it looked as if it was planted not long ago. 

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- The tour reached that vast planting area near the edge of the back yard. It blended in with the opposite corner. (B) Our host points out one palm in the far back, a Pinanga dicksonii, seen with an inflorescence. (viewed to the left of Don's hat). (C) This jungle area is densely planted. Tour host and FM. Dominic (dmc) continues through the section, pointing out plant after plant.

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- We rounded the corner and worked our way to the side yard while looking in nooks and crannies for plants. (C) We received a tour notification. It was now time to head over to the next destination, which was about fifteen minutes away.

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- Everything about this tour was new to me, so I looked forward to what the next stop was going to bring. Attendees began to file out of the backyard, while taking a last look around. When we reached the front yard, attendees headed down the driveway to their vehicles. I had to stop and photograph this perfect Teddy Bear Palm, Dypsis leptocheilos. (B) When I first arrived, I noticed inflorescences on the Dictyosperma album var. conjugatum, so I figured it needed a second look.

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Ryan

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- 11:10AM - The palm was mature and looked as if it had been flowering for a while now. Reaching maturity with a very short trunk is a popular feature of this variety. The waxy leaf bases are white to light tan in color. This specimen was showcasing a set of inflorescences in different stages. It had an unopened spathe covering the newest bract on the right and an older, developing (past flowered) one on the left.

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- The older inflorescence was past the flowering stage and the very beginnings of immature fruit can be seen forming. (B) And on the opposite side of the crownshaft... [poof] Pollen everywhere. This flower factory was at the point of staminate anthesis, or all the male flowers were open in full dispersal mode. It is hard to see in this shot, but the flowers were being visited by both bees and wasps. I could not tell if the lower-placed female flowers were open at the same time or not.

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- Not far away, this cycad captured my attention when I first arrived, but I had just missed its tour debut. I think it is a Dioon merolae.

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With high spirits and enthusiasm, attendees left Dominic's impressive yard with new garden ideas and images of plants seldom seen. We made our way towards the coast to visit an older residence belonging to an original palm grower and mainstay of the palm industry in South Florida, Jack Miller.

Ryan

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Jack Miller Residence

- 11:29AM - Jeff and I followed a group of attendees across the city of Stuart. The trip was straight forward and before we arrived at our destination we were told to look for a parking lot belonging to a nearby golf course. That would be the place for attendees to park and it turned out to be very convenient. There was plenty of room for parking and the lot was right across the street. As I was crossing said street I took a random photo showing the landscaping in front of a line of driveways and entrances. (B) While standing in the street (not recommended) I captured a photo of Jeff walking down the gravel driveway that led inside to Jack Miller's place. Notice the huge American Oil Palms, Attalea cohune, on both sides. You will see more of them later.

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- I made it across alive and reached the threshold. Past the entrance, a serious palm world was waiting. (B) Another A. cohune, one of several in the immediate vicinity. They were tall and impressive. Their feather-duster crowns were pushing their way towards the sky, acting simultaneously as both emergent palm and canopy.

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- As one would enter, the bright midday sun vanished and was replaced by filtered streams of light. It felt cooler instantly. The sixth sense of the palm nut took over and made one stop in their tracts to beginning admiring, looking and absorbing everything at once, with special care as to not miss anything. A gathering was up ahead creating conversation. We were still in the transition phase between tour locations as many were still in transit. (B) I tried to capture the scale of yet another A. cohune in the area but it was tricky.

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- Somehow, even though I thought we took the long way here, we were among the first to arrive. These early attendees began to loiter while waiting for the rest of the pack. Many took the time to introduce themselves to our second host of the day, Jack Miller (obscured, third from the right).

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Ryan

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The Gerg

Ryan, thank you so much for taking the time to post these pictures and do the write up. I love viewing palm gardens (like everyone on here I suppose). Dominic, well done. Looks like Jack has an amazing garden too. Can’t wait for the rest of the tour. :shaka-2:

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On 5/2/2019 at 12:30 AM, The Gerg said:

Ryan, thank you so much for taking the time to post these pictures and do the write up. I love viewing palm gardens (like everyone on here I suppose). Dominic, well done. Looks like Jack has an amazing garden too. Can’t wait for the rest of the tour. :shaka-2:

Viewing any palm or plant collection is a lot of fun. You never know what you will see. It could be a rare specimen ten times larger than what you would have thought possible or a member of an obscure plant family you had never heard of. Garden tours, either organized or spontaneous, are a great part of what being a plant nut is all about. I am always amazed at what I discover in a collection. The three gardens seen on this tour were fantastic. They each had their own unique character trait and were very different from one another, but all showed the same passion for palms and tropical plants.

Ryan

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Palmarum

- 11:31AM - We did our best to stay together near the entrance as the urge to explore was strong. Attendees continued to arrive by the minute. There was so much to look at. Everyone had their own view and traded it with others as they gazed in all directions. The species A. cohune was well represented by the seemingly endless supply of towering examples. (B) One section would be heavily planted by a mix of different plants and then you come to another that is solid with a single species. A colorful Teddy Bear Palm, Dypsis leptocheilos, resides a few feet from the driveway while surrounded by a very old and rather brilliant silver cluster of Saw Palmetto, Serenoa repens. This bright silver hue was found on several plants residing nearby, growing in near total shade.

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- Host and FM. Jack Miller (Jack Miller) (center in plaid) began to describe the property and the thoughts behind its origin. He mentioned the entire property was designed by famous landscape architect Raymond Jungles. There was evidence of his influence everywhere; from the use of the numerous A. cohune, the sunken garden and the stepped terraces in the backyard. The extensive work of Raymond Jungles is found throughout Florida and beyond. If you are unfamiliar with his work, you can search for images with his name, but they don't do justice to his repertoire which should be experienced in person. (B) A turn in the driveway was marked by a Bailey Palm, Copernicia baileyana.

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- As more people arrived, we began to slowly move forward and down the driveway. I got ahead of the group (no surprise) and took these shots looking back. Jack continued to introduce himself and welcome everyone to his palm paradise.

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- In one pocket of the yard near the driveway, a native coastal habitat had been recreated. A pond with water flow as a mimic of tidal change was the base of the exhibit that was surrounded with a spread of native species including a remarkable cultivated specimen of Red Mangrove, Rhizophora mangle (mucronata). It is hard to differentiate the Red Mangrove, but the crown is in the center and upper left of the frame, with the classic mangrove roots slightly visible in the lower-center of the image. Not the best photo I know, but the pond was in deep and I couldn't get up high enough.

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- 11:33AM - The sunken garden, or grotto, as it might also qualify. The sunken part of the property was a lower excavated depression with a single lower level. It was more or less shaped as a triangle with three sides and broad corners. It was completely landscaped. Not a square inch was wasted. There was a waterfall over one corner leading to a resting pool at the bottom. From this view, the aroids at my feet marked the near (southwestern) side wall and those boulders in the distance marked the far (east) wall. Those smaller boulders on the left, under the Zombia antillarum fan leaves are the staircase leading down. I was still standing on the driveway, which continued to my right and wrapped around to the east side of the sunken garden. (B) The feature was well done and just oozed palmness in all directions. Looking across from one side to another, the crown of a Cryosophila, possibly C. stauracantha, can be seen at ground level with the trunk descending down another 8 or 10 ft. (2.4-3m) to the lower level below. 

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- I continued around to the east side and turned around... looking back at where I was standing in the first shot above. This view shows the spread of the sunken garden, as both Jack and I were standing on the driveway. He was describing the grotto but I was out of earshot. I picked up the inflections of it being labor intensive and the drainage system being well-designed. I did hear that during a recent period of extreme rainfall that lasted several days, the sunken garden did not fill with water even once. (B) Standing in the same spot as in (A), I looked to the left across the driveway to a grouping of Old Man Palms, Coccothrinax crinita. Every designed location seemed to be made to fit a specific plant. Like the landscape was a 3-D puzzle and everything came in a box.

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- Attendees began to discover the sunken garden. One after another they found the stairs leading down or other paths leading (B) to the northwest side. I tried to move closer inwards, but I didn't want to a: fall or b: step on something.

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- Then it was my turn. I made my way to the lower level and began to soak it all up. I think every palm nut out there has had thoughts or dreamed about having a sunken garden or grotto at some point. (A) This photo did not come out as I had planned. I was pretending to have a tripod and trying to push a lot more depth of field by cheating a bit with the exposure. I was standing at the center of the lower level facing the waterfall and pool. The horizontal leaves belonged to a Zamia fairchildiana and the Dypsis rosea on the right was sporting a new red leaf. (B) The grotto seemed to be made for tree ferns. They were thriving in the rich, moist conditions. They seemed to be regular Australian Tree Ferns, Cyathea cooperi.

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- 11:37AM - Every footstep held a surprise or two. Opposite the staircase, two sides of the sunken garden came together forming a large corner. It looked as if there might have been another staircase or path leading back up but I couldn't tell as the corner was dominated by an impassible specimen of Rhapis multifida (recently lumped in with Rhapis humilis). The height of the palm was a good measuring stick for the depth of the sunken garden. Only the tallest crowns were poking above ground level. (B) A Licuala was tucked under part of a wall and was growing outwards towards the center of the grotto. It appeared to be a Licuala grandis but only 25% of the leaves were completely entire. The rest were partially divided with two lower lateral segments. It is more likely that this is L. grandis's closely related sporty cousin, Licuala cabalionii, and it's in transition between its juvenile and adult forms.

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- The Dypsis rosea once again, showing the crown and (B) underside of the newly emerging leaf.

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- Attendees were finding their way down as others were going back up. The stairs were even and well-placed. People proceeded slowly in case they were slippery as moss was everywhere. (B) Looking up into a tall and stretched Zombia antillarum, part of which was seen earlier and from above. The main stem was tall and had passed ground level, reaching up for the sky.

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- "Hey there!" -waves from below- Exploring the sunken garden created a great pause in the tour, as it gave everyone else a chance to arrive and catch up. With everyone looking down at me, I began to think tigers were going to be released and fighting music would start playing.

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- 11:39AM - A proper shot of the waterfall. The pool was just the right size. The sound of trickling water was perfect. (B) A few feet away, a grouping of Chamaedorea metallica and interestingly,... they were all of the Pinnate Form.

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- A nice and heavily spotted specimen of Zamia variegata (old Z. picta) occupied a small footprint near the path.

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- Looking up into the crown of the Cryosophila sp. seen earlier. (B) Litter collecting in progress.

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- I was on my way back up to ground level when I paused halfway up the stairs... I turned around and took this quick shot of attendees exploring the sunken garden. At the front, anticipating the photo and grinning as a result, FM. Rick Hawkins (rick).

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- 11:41AM - Back at the surface, the remaining attendees had arrived and began to assemble along the driveway by the sunken garden. (C) One by one they gathered into a rounded audience with Jack at the center, with Terry keeping everyone together.

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- Following an introduction by Terry, Jack welcomed everyone to his residence and added on to his own introduction. He continued with a brief history of the property, mentioning the details posted above. 

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- Terry went on to add tour details regarding timing and lunch, and so on. Jack began to answer questions and mentioned everyone was free to roam the property, even though most of us remained in a moving group.

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- 11:46AM - "Careful honey, you know what palms do to you." With a helpful hand, an attendee leans in to check out the hairy fiber on one (B) of the nearby Old Man Palms, Coccothrinax crinita.

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- With the initial garden and host introduction out of the way, we began to move down the driveway. We had to move slowly. As like it was in most of the yard, there were interesting items planted everywhere... up, down, left and right. If someone didn't immediately identify the plant, we had to ask Jack or hopefully someone in another group knew what it was. With the sunken garden on the left, we moved along the driveway which continued to make 'S' turns through the middle third of the property leading to the house.

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- "What is that incredible smell?!" As we entered the 'middle third' of the property, we came across a heavenly fragrance belonging to a White Champaca, Magnolia × alba. The fragrance was delicious and everyone took turns getting a whiff. I had to get closer photos of the flowers later.

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- Those who could get close enough to hear, were huddled around Jack as he named palms and identified other trees and plants. I couldn't hear from where I was, but I figured this was a Coccothrinax argentata adapted to shade. I got a closer look at another one later in the tour. (B) A nice Satakentia liukiuensis strives upwards towards the sky while showing off its trademark burgundy-wine colored crownshaft.

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- 11:49AM - A big Dioon species impersonating a fern. (B) The main group began to spread out as attendees went off path to check out plants while others lagged behind to photograph certain ones. As we got closer to the house, the gravel driveway forked in two directions, wrapping around a landscape island.

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- It was hard to not wander off, but some things just need a closer look. Tour Host, Society Director and FM. Tracy Sutherland (Tracy S) and Jeff spot something interesting in the vicinity (B) of a perfectly-grown Dictyosperma album var. conjugatum that was near the landscape island.

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- Gravel turned to concrete as we reached the garage and the house, which were nicely obscured by palms and plants. The group had a choice of either a left or right-hand path leading around the house. Most settled on left as we crossed the driveway.

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- One of the more unmistakable natives, a huge clump of Paurotis palm, Acoelorraphe wrightii occupies a corner near the driveway. (B) Another Attalea cohune fills a spot near the house. (C) I followed behind as the group headed around the left side of the house. Along the way, a Pinanga coronata var. 'Broad, wide-leaflet form' was looked over as it grew near the corner of the roof. This is the original, more common form known years ago as Pinanga kuhlii.

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- 11:52AM - Palm fanatics always walk single-file, to hide their numbers. Well we had to. The main group squeezed down a narrow path that left the driveway and followed along the side of the house. (B) Along the route, I turned around to find Jeff and others closing behind.

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- Deep shade turned to bright sun as we exited the forest canopy. One twist and a turn later, we left the path and found ourselves on the back patio by the pool. We were greeted with a view of the waterfront. It was a stunning contrast to where we had been exploring just a few seconds earlier.

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- The landscape design continued to the backyard. The area past the pool and patio was divided into terraces that followed the slope down to the water. A rather thick wooden 'bench' sat parallel to the pool's edge. Conversations were rich with exclamations over the landscape and the view. Everyone went their own way as small trails descended from the patio into the landscaped terraces.

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- Minus a large coconut, many of the palms and trees were shorter and understory in height. (B) The landscape was designed so you could see everything from the patio, so you didn't have to walk down if you did not want to.

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- 11:53AM - Host Jack Miller (center, facing camera) continued to guide attendees around the backyard. As there was a great deal to look at, you were rewarded if you left the patio and ventured further down. I moved (carefully) along the near-side of the pool, making sure I knew where patio ended and water began. (B) Walking around one L-shaped feature in the pool, I noticed this behemoth Key Thatch Palm, Leucothrinax morrisii, growing in a cut-out square. The trunk on this palm was huge! It was short and stocky. A regular photo wouldn't cut it, so I asked Rick Johnson to pose with the palm. An offspring was growing in behind the trunk on the left.

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- Crossing over to the right side of the pool, facing the water, I moved across the patio to the terraces. This area was home to well-aged and ancient specimens. It was a mix of native species and Caribbean favorites. (B) A mass of succulent rosettes greeted attendees as they began their climb down. I am sure the succulent and agave enthusiasts on the Forum can identify it.

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- Two of the plants were in bloom. They were in the process of producing very tall, whip-like, catkin-style inflorescences. The flowers were opening from the bottom first. The larger rosettes were 2 to 3 ft. (0.6-1m) across. My best guess is Agave attenuata.

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- A trail led around the mystery agave grove and led towards the middle, where it split off in different directions anchored by a robust and chunky Buccaneer Palm, Pseudophoenix sargentii. It was currently working on two large infructescences which held a ton of seed. Some were just starting to turn red. This palm had some years on it, probably could tell a story or two. (B) To the right and down a couple levels resided a native, yet ancient Lignum-Vitae, Guaiacum sanctum. The crown was dotted with opening seed pods, showing the bright red aril-covered seeds.

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- 11:56AM - The various trails converged at one point leading to an extension of the dock as it led straight to the water. Both sides were fully landscaped and made movement impassible if on foot, either by nature or design. There were other trails that one could take to get to the waters edge.

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- Following the trails and the dock, I was now below the Lignum-Vitae, Guaiacum sanctum, seen above. It was one of the largest specimens I have ever seen. It was growing near the edge of one terrace, overlooking another. I could not guess the age but it must be significant. Even the wood is worth a lot.

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- At the next lower terrace, the landscape was packed full of palms. Another mature Pseudophoenix sargentii was near the trail, while the area in behind (B) was home to a grouping of Coccothrinax borhidiana, including a taller-than-average specimen. It was featuring a nice full skirt.

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- Sunlight was coming in at the right angle to illuminate a silvery white specimen of Latania loddigesii. There were a few specimens located around the backyard and they differed in their color. (B) Can you say pretzel variety? This photo might be confusing at first. The Sabal crown you see in the background is connected to the trunk seen in the foreground, running diagonally left to right, with a downward full curve and ending back nearly vertical. It was amazing to wrap ones eyes on such a palm acrobat.

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- 11:58AM - Moving a step to the left, I took another shot of the pretzel Sabal. There were more of these twisted palms in the landscape and it was hard to see where one began and where another one ended. (B) One by one, attendees began to venture out to the end of the dock by the boat lift.

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- The crown of another pretzel'd Sabal Palm. It looks regular in this shot, but when you follow the trunk down it turns into this... (B). The crown in the left image connects to the more vertical trunk rising from right to left in the shot. The crown on the right belongs to the trunk that lowers to the ground, then angles towards the background with a full curve, crossing in front of the other one then going behind it. The trunk then extends towards the shrubby background, disappearing from sight. These acrobatic palms could have been formed to grow like this, but as being so slow growing, it would have taken decades. I didn't have a chance to ask about them, but I should have, as I have more theories about their origin.

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- Another Latania loddigesii seen off the trail and surrounded by dense cover. It's a female, holding a few infructescences bearing immature seed. (B) A closer view of the silver white specimen seen above.

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- 11:59AM - "If I stay perfectly still... they can't see me." I began to go off-path and explore more of the sections and terraces on foot. The first was the paddock belonging to the Coccothrinax borhidiana which consisted of about a dozen individuals. (B) Walking along the shaped edge of the terrace, one had to take care as to the occasional loose stepping stone and wobbly boulder. Reaching the far side, I found tour goer Cathy Burger doing the same thing: ogling the palms.

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- Standing in the same spot and looking upwards, I found another mature Pseudophoenix sargentii. (B) Backtracking a bit, I had to get a portrait of the larger, skirted C. borhidiana seen before.

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- Just solid palmness in every direction. Separate from the theme but a welcome sight, a robust mass of Allagoptera arenaria occupied a large spot... in between everything else. I got the feeling it was enjoying this Seashore location.

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- I could not get enough of this tree. I found myself on the opposite side of the Lignum-vitae, Guaiacum sanctum, and was photographing through it. It was shaped like a giant bonsai. The wood is priceless as one of the heaviest in the world so I was wondering what an average branch would weigh.

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- 12:01PM - "Do you see that?!" PBPCS Board Member Ruth Lynch points out the Lignum-vitae to everyone around, including Rick and PBPCS President Richard Murray. It was good to see the enthusiasm, as I was already stuck on the tree. (B) A view looking back up at the house. Towards the left, FM. Kyle (kylecawazafla) was talking to another attendee. A couple more Key Thatch Palms, Leucothrinax morrisii, at varying heights were scattered on the lower levels and up by the house.

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- This palm held my attention for a while. I noticed how the tips of the long leaves were dipping slightly and how the leaflets were very thin and bending along half their length. I remembered some of these traits described to me once by grower Ron Croci, who specialized in the genus Pseudophoenix. I stare every day at a similar-sized specimen of P. vinifera in my front yard and figured this palm had to be different. I was left with the strong possibility of Pseudophoenix lediniana, as I also remember seeing similar specimens in the Dominican Republic. (B) Another view of the mystery agave.

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- Ruth was laughing pretty good as I walked back to where all the trails came together by the dock. (B) I couldn't figure out what was so funny, probably something her husband Terry said on the right.

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- I took my turn to head out along the dock to check out the river and the sights. The seas were calm and the waves would barely water one's toes. (B) I started down the dock, while noticing how far it reached and how shallow the depth was of the surrounding water. I know in this area of Florida, and it might be the same everywhere, but from the edge of your property, you are allowed to build a dock as far as you can to reach a depth of 4 feet (1.2m) at low tide (I have a lot of relatives who fish in the area). Walking along the dock I noticed it was a consistent, flat, muddy bottom; almost like a shelf leading out from the shore.

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- 12:05PM - I was looking for fish as I made my way to the end of the dock. One lift held a twin-hull or 'twin vee' power catamaran. (B) When I got to the end, I turned around to look at the house and backyard. Attendees were gathering at the end of the dock, while others would walk out then walk back.

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- It looks available. The property next door was flat and barren of any structure. It looked like a nice chunk of real estate. It came with a dock at least.

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- I continued to view along the shoreline as I noticed attendees continuing to explore the backyard, while some of us chatted on the dock.

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- Almost every property has their own dock. Some had toys some didn't. (B) This is the St. Lucie River. This is the wide southern section as it heads towards the Atlantic, not far away. In the distance, that is the SE. Ocean Blvd. Bridge or AIA extension, a little over a mile (2km) away.

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Ryan

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- 12:07PM - Panning from left to right, I photographed across the river. According to my fellow tour goers who were pointing out details and describing the history of the area, the land across the river is called Sewall's Point; a higher-than-average valued community with large houses and fancy landscapes. It is a narrow strip of land with one way in or out, with the Intercoastal waterway on the other side.

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- I started to walk back across. (B) As I got closer I noticed I didn't see anyone. Where did everyone go?

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- A seating area near the shore. There were more than enough chairs. (B) Still didn't see anyone, but I heard voices (in the distance).

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- Back on land and by the pool. I figured everyone continued on towards the driveway and the garage, by following the second path (right side from earlier) around the other side of the house. A quick shot of one of the Leucothrinax morrisii seen earlier close to the house. It had a taller, thinner trunk. (B) Before entering the heavy canopy once again, I took one last shot across the pool and patio.

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Ryan

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- 12:12PM - I found myself at the tail end of the main tour group. The others had followed the path to the front of the house and I was catching up, one palm at a time. As soon as I entered the canopy, I came face to face with this old, old Kentia Palm, Howea forsteriana. It was one of several specimens planted in a narrow bed that ran parallel to the house. As you can see, it had already reached the soffit of the two-story roof. It was beginning to tilt and will eventual bend to get around the roof; while on its way to full sun. (B) The second shot shows the tilt with a better angle.

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- Following the trunk down from the above views led to this shot of the base. This is when I noticed those other petioles belonging to a smaller H. forsteriana sticking out from the ground cover. "Oh, It must have flowered and dropped seed." I thought as I continued down the path. (B) I came to another tall H. forsteriana specimen with an adjacent, smaller trunked specimen. At the base were more juveniles growing out with purpose and stretched petioles.

Well here is the mystery: I asked host Jack Miller about these palms and he said that none of the Howea forsteriana specimens have flowered. None of them. He was quite certain. I asked if by chance were smaller seedlings or plants planted nearby? Nope. Then where did the juvenile plants come from? He had no idea. I would accept from looking the plants over that the smaller trunk-bearing specimen was originally part of a staggered double and was planted along with its taller neighbor. The taller specimen had several more feet of trunk, so I figured it was growing dominant, taking most of the resources. The juveniles were too far away to be regular suckers, if Howea's ever do sucker which I have never seen nor heard of. So, has anyone seen this before or does it remain a mystery?

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- Continuing down the path, I found an even taller specimen of Howea forsteriana. It had long since cleared the roof and was now fighting with the Sabals for airspace. (B) The path reached the driveway between the house and garage, where I found many of the attendees milling about. This corner, where yard met house, contained a wide array of palms and plants.

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- This section of the yard contained different planting themes and shaded areas that seemed to overlap with one another. Distinctive leaves adorn a nice Cryosophila warscewiczii growing in one bed. (B) The flow of Kentia's rounded the house and continued to poke up through the canopy at varying heights. The trunk in the center led (C) to a more viewable crown.

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- 12:16PM - I followed along the front of the house, mostly looking for stuff I didn't see earlier. A beefy Alcantarea imperialis occupied a rounded notch. It was of the regular form and was doing its best to fight off the nearby Burle Marx Philodendron. (B) A grouping of Kerriodoxa elegans occupied another bed and were enjoying the filtered light.

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- The K. elegans were planted far enough apart so they could reach their elephant-sized Footprints. (B) Peeking under one leaf, showing the bright white underside.

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- A carved statue made a handy hose holder. (B) Good ol' Charlie, Stromanthe stromanthoides cv. 'Charlie'. This is one of my favorite members of the Marantaceae, the Prayer-Plant family, It was originally discovered by its namesake plant collector, grower and medicinal plant extraordinaire Charlie McDaniels. I had the pleasure to learn a lot from him during the '90s and early 2000s but it did not compare to the sum of his knowledge; which at times seemed endless.

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- At the moment, the tour was focused on the areas around the driveway. This seemed to be the end (or near the end) of the second length of the tour as we began to slowly make our way to the entrance. Attendees were taking second or third looks at items we first noticed on the walk down the gravel driveway.

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Ryan

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- 12:18PM - Before heading back up to the entrance, I noticed this Ceratozamia sp. growing under a tree near the garage. I heard a few possible ID's but they weren't close. (B) It has a cool cascading leaf and a couple plants comprise the mass.

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- Everyone began a slow march to the street. Those who didn't spot the Dictyosperma album var. conjugatum the first time, now had their chance. (B) Richard took a shine to it instantly.

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- Weird plant. It is hard to recognize when not in flower, looks like a strange agave. This is the Narrow-leaved Bird of Paradise, Strelitzia juncea. (B) Tour host Jack Miller was showing attendees through areas off the beaten path. They were gathered in front of a dark green Syagrus amara. At this point in the tour, people began to thank Jack for his time and for letting them see his amazing property. Those attendees who were ready for the next stop began to depart, but we had plenty of time as it was just down the street.

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- Yummy. I went back to get more shots of the White Champaca, Magnolia × alba. Also to smell it again. (B) With Jeff's assistance, I got a photo of both the top and lower leaf surfaces of a Guihaia argyrata. That is an incredible contrast.

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- 12:25PM - Jeff and I, along with many of the attendees, began to meander our way back through the property and on towards the parking lot. Eventually. There were too many instances to stop and look around, not to mention engage in conversations. I was lagging behind taking photos when I caught up to Jeff as he was in a confab with a group of attendees. I passed by as he was telling a story and describing something.

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- We were back at first part of the driveway as Jeff fired off a comment in my direction: "Ryan, let's go... you ready yet?" without noticing I was ahead of him.

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- I was almost to the gate when I heard conversations continue behind me. (B) I made it to the end of the driveway and turned around to spot Jeff trying real hard to pull himself away from exchanging comments.

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- It was like watching a rubber band stretch and snap. Jeff was walking in one direction while talking in reverse and looking for me at the same time. (B) He was laughing over his shoulder as he prodded forward, before noticing I was waiting for him.

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We darted across the street to the parking lot and began to plan the next leg of the trip, which was measured in feet instead of miles. We drove down the same street passing a few houses, made a turn, passed a few more houses and then 'ding' we were at the last garden of the tour. This one that would go on to blow my mind and rewrite the book on what I thought was 'cold tolerance'.

Ryan

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Tracy Sutherland Collection

- 12:36PM - We arrived at the last garden of the day within a few minutes. Before we indulged in the buffet of eye candy waiting for us, we had to take care of the actual food for lunch. Jeff and I entered Tracy's house and proceeded to drop off our coolers, food and desserts. The Palm and tropical plant theme was most evident. Before heading back outside, I had to photograph a perfectly-grown indoor specimen of Chamaedorea metallica. It was in a glazed, deep blue pot that has become a popular choice for showcasing Palms in containers. (B) Once, I almost bought this same tropical-themed lamp myself. I thought it was interesting, not just for the plant leaf-like shades but for the coconut-mimic light bulbs. Time to run outside and start palm gorging...

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- 12:42PM - Tour host and FM. Tracy Sutherland (Tracy S) greeted Jeff and I as soon as we arrived. We were a bit early, as this leg of the tour was scheduled to start around 1:00PM. Many of the tour goers were still back at Jack Miller's place looking around, knowing the third garden was so close by. Tracy was describing the growth rate of a plant as I was focused on a (B) leafy specimen of Ensete, an ornamental banana.

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- It was immediately apparent upon arrival that this garden was dedicated to house a tropical palm and plant collection. The first eye fulls contained surprise after surprise. I could not believe some of the relatively cold sensitive plants that were growing and thriving this far north; far beyond what I would consider a safe latitude. The possible cold tolerance thresholds on many species were being re-written as we took step after step. (B) Planting beds were well defined by mulch layers and rock borders. The pathways were layered with black mulch which provided a nice contrast.

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- The first of many surprises to come, a very happy specimen of Phoenicophorium borsigianum. I have seen specimens damaged by cold in the Florida Keys... and this palm has been growing in Stuart! Notice the large name tag. It is a slate-plate label hanging on a tall wire holder. You will see many of them throughout Tracy's collection. They are reusable like chalk boards and are completely weather resistant. (B) A double Christmas Palm, Adonidia merrillii, was providing shade for many smaller specimens located underneath.

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- 12:44PM - The collection was spread across the entire property. The lot is a long rectangle with the house at the center, nearly dividing the yard in half with a pool and patio in the backyard. Every planting bed was full of material; old specimens mixed with newer juveniles, palms and cycads, tropical foliage plants, flowering trees and shrubs and on and on. There were plants I had not seen in a long time and others I had never seen before. "What is that?" was repeated often. More attendees began to arrive early so we began to wander through the front yard on our own, waiting for the majority to arrive.

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- I went out by the street and took a shot looking up the driveway with the annoying glare. Any photo taken while looking to the south was prone to this intense glare thanks to the low angle of the sun. I had to keep reminding myself that this typical warm day was the fifth of January, only 15 days after the Winter Solstice. (B) One side of the driveway was guarded by a pyramid-shaped Screw Pine, Pandanus utilis.

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- Turning further to the right, a robust Bismarck Palm, Bismarckia nobilis, was marking the middle of the front yard. (B) I walked back up the driveway and followed a path at random, just to explore. Certain palms were pot-planted in a few spots, including this Heterospathe elata the Sagisi or older-named Coppertop Palm. I wasn't sure as to why this palm and others were placed in ground with their pots. Perhaps to provide instant and temporary shade as a fast-growing specimen. (C) It was showing a new copper-red leaf.

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- Having everything labeled made things so much easier. A labeled Philodendron melinonii occupied one spot in the shade. This was the first time I noticed the extensive irrigation system that Tracy and Doug had devised for the collection. Every plant had their own point of irrigation. Whether it was a bubbler head, a drip emitter, a micro emitter or a sprinkler head. The entire yard was crisscrossed with a network of poly tubing in different sizes.

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Daryl

Thanks for taking the time and effort to capture and post these great yard tour photos Ryan!

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Tracy S

Thanks for taking pictures of my garden. I really appreciate t he work you put into these posts. It was a pleasure to have every one drop by.

Thanks 

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Palmarum
On 5/15/2019 at 5:06 PM, Tracy S said:

Thanks for taking pictures of my garden. I really appreciate t he work you put into these posts. It was a pleasure to have every one drop by.

Thanks 

You are most welcome Tracy. It was a pleasure to attend the tour and to visit your garden and impressive collection. I am still overwhelmed by the entirety of how many different plants you had growing in harmony with one another. I took as many photos as I could in the time we had and only captured maybe a third of what your garden held. Any amount of imagination is not enough to depict what it will look like years from now.

Ryan

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- 12:46PM - I was one of the first of the tour to enter this section of the front yard. Attendees continued to arrive out by the street and others were milling about along the driveway. I knew there would be another formal-type of introduction, but I couldn't wait. Seeing one palm led me to another plant and another and so on, like a palm overload-type chain reaction. A fat and thick, newly-trunk forming Carpoxylon macrospermum had begun to go vertical in a good way. (B) Like every other plant it had its own irrigation point, a bubbler head in this case.

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- Positioned under the Bismarck Palm seen earlier, a tall and mature Areca vestiaria var. 'Maroon Leaf' was putting on its own show.

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- The older, taller stem had a few feet of trunk and a couple of inflorescences, one open, the other on its way. The darker maroon color had turned more reddish-orange with all the light exposure and decorated both crownshafts. The color shifted to orange as it entered the upper leaf bases and petioles. (C) It was hard to see, but a newly-emergent maroon leaf was on its way out at the top of the crown. This variety does seem to be a bit more cold tolerant than the regular species, but not by much, so it was still an impressive sight to see this far north.

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- One of several propane heaters strategically placed throughout the yard. This was the last line of defense against the cold as there were other natural and artificial barriers and sources of heat nearby. During one of her tour presentations, Tracy mentioned how her proximity of the St. Lucie River helps in preventing severe cold from setting in to her garden. A nearby horse farm provides a slow but steady stream of heat in addition to a conveniently placed boat works and marine maintenance facility that does the same. Like a triangle-shaped 'shield' of cold protection. (B,C) Many palms and plants were growing in areas based mostly on their eventual size more than their origin, so there weren't any country or regional themes. As a result, any species could appear anywhere in the collection, especially those of the Madagascar club, i.e. this very healthy Dypsis pilulifera, the old Dypsis sp. 'Jurassic Park'.

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- 12:48PM - It didn't take long for other attendees to pick a path to explore. Jeff and Rick were next and proceeded through the front yard, pausing now and then while discussing the plants before (or behind) them. This included the Carpoxylon macrospermum, of which they were unknowingly providing scale.

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- A random view, looking across one planting bed in the front yard. A nice Licuala peltata var. sumawongii resides on the right as a (B) mystery palm takes up another spot on the left. It was labeled as Salacca magnifica × 'Unknown'. I should have more photos of it later. 

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- With plenty of space to grow, a Corypha umbraculifera bides its time as a juvenile. (B) There was plenty to see and photograph. Jeff, Rick and now Gerry were viewing plants and taking photos at the same time.

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- Rick and Jeff were exchanging notes in regards to flowering trees they saw during the Biennial in Colombia, while looking over similar specimens nearby. (B) This palm escaped my notes. It resembles Pinanga adangensis with its widely-spaced suckers and newly emergent pink rachises, but isn't on the palm list provided to us by Tracy. It's a beautiful Pinanga regardless of the name.

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      Today, I became aware of the South Florida Palm Society's upcoming Spring Garden Tour. I figured the notification and the related information should be posted here on Palmtalk. It sounds as if there will be a large attendance. In addition to the South Florida Palm Society membership, they are expecting attendees from the Palm Beach Palm & Cycad Society and the Tropical Flowering Tree Society.
       
      The following is from the society's homepage: Link: http://www.southfloridapalmsociety.org/index.shtml
      The South Florida Palm Society is a not-for-profit organization whose mission is to disseminate information about and encourage interest in palms and the use of these plants.  The South Florida Palm Society uses its funds to help support local botanical gardens, individual scientific research expeditions or projects, conservation and planting projects and educational efforts.
      Upcoming Activities
      May 4, 2019: A Spring Garden Tour, will begin at 9:30 am at Fairchild Botanical Garden. For details, click here. (displayed below) Members and non-members are invited. Please reserve by Apr 30,
      June 3, 2019. General Meeting at the Corbin Building at Fairchild, beginning at 7:00 pm. Auction of donated palms followed by a presentation. Speaker to be announced.
      ...
       
      Following the click here seen above leads you to the event page: Link: https://www.southfloridapalmsociety.org/2019gardentour.shtml
      Spring Garden Tour, May 4 from 9:30 am to 3:15 pm.
      We will be enjoying a two-part, combined event, with members of the Tropical Flowering Tree Society (TFTS) and the Palm Beach Palm and Cycad Society (PBPCS). More plant people than you can shake a stick at!
      The event will take place on Saturday, May 4, 2019. We will gather and check-in at Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden (main, north entrance) at 9:30 am.
      Part One: Organized by the PBPCS, this portion of the day's program is a tour of the Montgomery Palmetum at Fairchild Tropical Botanical Garden, where Fairchild Director of Collections Dr. Brett Jestrow will narrate.
      While I'm sure many of you have seen the Montgomery Palmetum at FTBG before, this is an opportunity to see it with narration from FTBG's expert, and contributing questions and comments from your fellow palm enthusiasts.
      We will ride the FTBG tram as part of the tour, space available.
      Part Two: After the FTBG tour we'll begin the SFPS portion of the day's program, which has three activities, all included in the price of the SFPS tour:
      1. A picnic lunch, immediately next door at Matheson Hammock Park. We can simply walk there, no need to move your cars, as the picnic area is about 50 yards from the FTBG entrance.
      IMPORTANT! We will need strong volunteers to move picnic tables together for the picnic! This would be best accomplished between 9:30 and 10:00 am, before the FTBG Palmetum tour begins. Please let me know if you can help.
      2. Private garden number one. This is an excellent garden, highly recommended by all who have seen it.
      3. Private garden number two. Another excellent garden, this one includes a Coco de Mer (Lodoicea maldivica) planted in 2002!
      The addresses and location maps to the private gardens will be revealed / handed out that day, just before each garden tour, in scavenger-hunt style. This is done on purpose, as a courtesy to the homeowners, because in the past some folks jumped the gun and showed up at the locations before the homeowners were ready to receive guests.
      Tentative Itinerary:

      9:30 am: Gather for check-in, buying SFPS Tour Tickets, assisting with moving tables, etc. Mingle freely and converse with many palm aficionados until the tour begins.
      10:00 am: Part One begins with the FTBG tour of its Palmetum. Ooh and awe.
      12:00 noon: Part Two begins with the SFPS picnic. Consume freely. Eat, drink and be merry. Socialize with your fellow palm nerds.
      1:15 pm: The address and location maps to Private Garden Number One are handed out, and the group begins its drive to that location. (approx 16 minute drive time)
      1:35 pm: The group arrives at Private Garden Number One, the tour begins. Glee and joy.
      2:10 pm: The address and location maps to Private Garden Number Two are handed out, and the group begins its drive to that location. (approx 10 minute drive time)
      2:25 pm: The group arrives at Private Garden Number Two, the tour begins. Wow and other synonyms for happy exclamation.
      3:15 pm: The tour ends. Drive home safely, feeling validated as a true palm nerd, in a euphoric state after having seen such resplendent and bucolic beauty.
      Money:
      Part One: Fairchild will charge their usual admission fee of $25 for adults, $12 for students, $18 for seniors (over 65). If you are a Fairchild member, you get in free. You can join Fairchild on the spot. (PBPCS members - I've heard you have some special arrangement. Your people will let you know about that.)
      Part Two: The South Florida Palm Society portion of the tour is free for SFPS members, $10 for non-members. That includes the picnic lunch. If one wishes to join the SFPS on the spot, annual memberships are $25, $40 for families. Individuals under age 40 pay only $1 (with proof of age).
      PLEASE RSVP ASAP!
      It is very important that we have an accurate head count for Part Two, the SFPS portion of this event. Please let me know by April 30, 2019 if you're coming to Part Two, whether you're an SFPS member or not (we have to know how much water to put in the soup): ElvisCruz@mac.com
      Anticipating Possible Questions:
      Do I have to attend the Fairchild portion? I've already seen it, and / or I don't want to pay to get into Fairchild.
      No, you can show up for the picnic and private garden tours, at 12:00 noon.
      I am a member of TFTS or PBPCS. Do I still have to pay for the picnic and private garden tours?
      Yes. It is $10 for the picnic and private garden tours, and only SFPS members get in free (It is included with their SFPS membership, and you can join that day.)
      I don't want to eat at the picnic, I only want to take the garden tours. Do I still have to pay $10?
      Yes, the $10 includes the picnic and the two private garden tours. You can participate in whichever of the three you like.
      Is the picnic pot luck? Am I supposed to bring a dish to share?
      No, the picnic is not pot luck, it will be complete, including beverages, but if you are a kind-hearted person who wants to bring a dish to share you certainly may.
      I don't like the SFPS. I think you guys are snotty and nerdy. Can I just do the FTBG tour and then leave?
      We are not snotty! Yes, of course, you can do either or both parts of the day's events.
      Please remember to RSVP, ElvisCruz@mac.com
      Please volunteer if you can to help move picnic tables, starting at 9:30 am.
      Have a very Happy Palm Sunday!
      Happy Palming,
      Elvis Cruz
      2019 president,
      South Florida Palm Society
       
       
       
       
       
      Ryan
    • Palmarum
      By Palmarum
      Spring Garden Tour
      Croton Meeting & Auction
      Saturday, April 6th, 2019
      Palmboo Gardens - (Mike Harris Residence)
      Cooper City, S. Florida
       
      Earlier in the year, Palmtalk and Palmpedia members and local plant people in Central and South Florida began planning a combined event that included a tour of a plant collection, a meeting of Croton and tropical plant enthusiasts and a plant auction that focused on unusual Croton cultivars. This type of event usually takes place both in the spring and the fall and tends to move its location around the southern third of the state, including both coasts. The conversations involving the location and date centered around a topic on Palmpedia. After circulating ideas on locales, gardens, dates, etc. Forum member Mike Harris (waykoolplantz) offered both his yard and time to the event, and with a joint consensus, his residence and collection became the location. Now we just had to wait for April and for the fun to begin...
      - 10:29AM - The time for the meeting was set at 10:30 in the morning. Being only a few minutes away myself, I arrived at about the designated start time after a four minute drive. I was not the first to arrive by far, as there was a line of vehicles parked out front. After entering the grounds, I didn't see anyone at first but I could hear conversations in the distance. I figured the early birds were on their own exploring the collection. I began to meander through the yard, taking photos, looking at what has grown since my last visit. I 'followed the voices' and made a heading towards the house. The grassy knoll that welcomes visitors by the entrance displays a line of deciduous trees, mostly different species of Adansonia. (B) Immediately to my right, a trio of Peach Trees, Prunus persica, were growing with vigor and fruit. I would have to take a closer look later.

      - I had one palm in mind that I had to check out first. Up near the house, the Double Coconut, Coco de Mer, Lodoicea maldivica, resides near the edge of a planting bed adjacent to the pool enclosure. It has been growing well in this location for more than a few years. It survived Hurricane Irma and is still growing out of the physical damage. It lost some of its canopy due to the storm and is still adapting to the increase in direct sunlight. 

      - The pool enclosure is packed full of Palms and other plants. The palmy surroundings would be the location for the event's lunch time spread. The majority of the plants are container grown and fed with drip irrigation, including the broad Salacca magnifica and the taller Pinanga speciosa.

      - Moving left to right, showing the layout. The overhang on the right held the ever-growing lunch spread. The sun was almost directly overhead and made the area underneath dark and hard to compose.

      Ryan
    • Palmarum
      By Palmarum
      Spring Garden Tour - Croton Meeting & Auction - S. Florida
      Link to Topic: https://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/59599-spring-garden-tour-croton-meeting-auction-s-florida-april-6th-2019/
      Ryan
    • Palmarum
      By Palmarum
      Spring Garden Tour
      Croton Meeting & Auction
      Saturday, April 6th, 2019
      Cooper City, S. Florida
       
      The next Croton 'Group' Meeting and Auction has been combined with the S. Florida-based Spring Garden Tour. It will take place at a popular and well-known garden, consisting of a vast Palm, Croton and tropical plant collection. I believe most of the plants for the Auction will be Croton cultivars, including some extremely rare ones, but I think any plant may show up. The auctioned plants support the donor, as there isn't an actual Croton Society anymore. Trading and personal sales among plant fanatics is popular among the attendees. There is usually a huge spread of food brought by those in attendance. These tours and meetings have been a fun way to explore a garden and spend time with fellow plant enthusiasts in the area. The auctions have always been exciting to see what rare cultivar comes up for bid, and what bids they may bring.
      For location, details, directions, ideas on what to bring for food or plants, or to have any other questions answered, send an email to the following address:
      email: colorfulcrotons@gmail.com
       

      Ryan
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